Which? uses cookies to improve our sites and by continuing you agree to our cookies policy.

University of Strathclyde

Glasgow| West of Scotland

Diverse local nightlife Political City Campus

Ucas code: S78

The University of Strathclyde was established in 1796 as the 'place of useful learning' and today from the centre of the vibrant city of Glasgow it continues to provide its students with a relevant, high-quality education. The global application of research and knowledge exchange ensures Strathclyde takes its place as a leading international technological institution.
Source: University of Strathclyde Students' Association

What students say about this university

Dialog 1023 comments (288 students)
    • Academic Experience

      The volume and complexity of work was way beyond what would be possible if this were a 9am-5pm course. This is a 24/7 course...

      Read more

      2013, 3rd year, Electrical Engineering

      Academic Experience

      The volume and complexity of work was way beyond what would be possible if this were a 9am-5pm course. This is a 24/7 course which consumes every aspect of your life. You must sacrifice any student experience in order to prioritise that which really matters; the academic experience. Feedback is usually broad and vague and you have to beat a path to an individuals door if you want to hear more useful comments. Assessment is now continually assessed which features a tiny bit of practical with the vast majority for 5 years being exams, tests and coursework.

      2013, 3rd year, Electrical Engineering

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×
    • Academic Experience

      The course starts fairly easy in your first year, with a lot of catch up work and reinforcement of the basics, in many ways a...

      Read more

      2013, 3rd year, Applied Chemistry

      Academic Experience

      The course starts fairly easy in your first year, with a lot of catch up work and reinforcement of the basics, in many ways a walk in the park. However! From year 2 onwards it is very very intense with a lot to take in in a short space of time. In the chemistry faculty there are lectures 5 days a week from 9 - 2 (with breaks) and then labs 4 days a week from 2 - 5 (although some weeks you have no labs!). The work load and times doesn't actually seem too intense but there is a lot of hard work and studying required with reports due frequently. The tutors mark each homework or lab report and give a mark, percentage and then give a short explanation of where you've went wrong, but are always happy to have email conversations or meetings to help you further and discuss areas you are struggling in. In this case you can always feel secure that even if you are falling behind the staff are there to help and they want to get you through! Speaking for the chemistry faculty the facilities available are simply fantastic with labs being updated every year to the most modern equipment and everything readily available!

      2013, 3rd year, Applied Chemistry

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×
    • Academic Experience

      The departments are really good at providing the course, and accommodating their students. They do seem to get screwed over by...

      Read more

      2013, 3rd year, Quantum Mechanics

      Academic Experience

      The departments are really good at providing the course, and accommodating their students. They do seem to get screwed over by the university administration though, who seem to have made it their personal duty to make the departments' jobs as hard as possible, through silly policies.

      2013, 3rd year, Quantum Mechanics

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×
    • Academic Experience

      usually around 20 hours of classes a week, with at least one afternoon during the week of lab session (at least in physics,...

      Read more

      2013, 3rd year, Physics Not Elsewhere Classified

      Academic Experience

      usually around 20 hours of classes a week, with at least one afternoon during the week of lab session (at least in physics, more in later years) courses are, compared to other universities (in other countries), relatively easy, a lot of repetition of material covered in previous years skipping first year (if direct entry into second year is possible) is probably doable, as first year is almost only repetition from advanced highers, but pretty stressful; for enjoying the uni experience a bit more, it's not bad to do first year anyway physics course covers all major areas of physics; until fourth year almost all courses are requirements, there is no choice, except for electives in first year; from fourth year on a research project is required and specialized topics can be chosen freely course work is mostly exams, during the semester tutorials with practice questions (which usually don't count a lot) and lab reports; in later years also more longer reports and presentations feedback during the semester mostly through tutorials / homework questions, if at all course-specific facilities are undergraduate labs (including electronics, optics, mechanics, etc.) and a common room

      2013, 3rd year, Physics Not Elsewhere Classified

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×
    • Academic Experience

      I really enjoy my course because I love the subject, so it's really important to pick a subject you enjoy. Teaching time does...

      Read more

      2013, 3rd year, Civil Engineering Not Elsewhere Classified

      Academic Experience

      I really enjoy my course because I love the subject, so it's really important to pick a subject you enjoy. Teaching time does vary a lot between courses, and engineering can be quite time-intensive compared to some courses. Civil engineering work consists of design projects, lab exercises and reports, occasionally a fairly short essay (apart from the dissertation!) and exams. You'll also have tutorial questions for most classes.

      2013, 3rd year, Civil Engineering Not Elsewhere Classified

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×
    • Sport

      There are many competitive teas in university and local leagues such as football, rugby, hockey, netball, ultimate frisby and...

      Read more

      2014, 4th year, Biomolecular Science

      Sport

      There are many competitive teas in university and local leagues such as football, rugby, hockey, netball, ultimate frisby and more, along with trampolining clubs, swimming, squash, badminton and tennis. The university also includes a gym having recently undergone some refurbishments.

      2014, 4th year, Biomolecular Science

      ×
      Report

      Are you sure you want to report this Student View for us to review?

      ×

How students describe this university

We asked more than 11,000 undergraduates to say how far they would describe their uni as having the following characteristics. We carry out this analysis where we have scores from at least 30 students. You can also see whether these ratings are high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Creative

49%

LOW

Political

64%

HIGH

Varied union activities

71%

MED

Sporty

64%

MED

Diverse local nightlife

80%

HIGH

Vital stats

Sources: NSS, DLHE & HESA
% of graduates in work or further study 97% MED
Average graduate salary £22.5k HIGH
Student score 78% MED

Overall student satisfaction

87%

of students are very or quite satisfied with this university

Number of students

21,470

students attended last year

Undergraduate / Postgraduate

70%

of students are undergrads

Full-time / Part-time

21%

of students are part-time

Male / Female

51%

of students are female

Young / Mature

17%

of students aged over 21

UK / Non-UK

18%

of students here are from outside the UK

University images

League table rankings

Here's where this university ranks in the three main league tables (where available), which are calculated using a combination of stats that they each weight in different ways. They’re a handy guide but don’t offer the full picture – just because a university is top (or bottom) of the league tables doesn’t mean it is (or isn’t) the right choice for you.

More on what university league tables really tell you.

Where it's located

We’ve pinpointed the key sites where teaching takes place. Check in the smallprint of the course you’re interested in to see where exactly you’d be based, especially if there are multiple locations spread across a wide area.

Get all the advice
Expert tips for uni - straight to your inbox
Free to students, teachers and parents
Sign me up
Follow us