We use cookies to allow us and selected partners to improve your experience and our advertising. By continuing to browse you consent to our use of cookies. You can understand more and change your cookies preferences here.

Falmouth University

Game Development: Audio

UCAS Code: W283

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


We welcome A Levels in a wide range of subjects, especially in those relevant to the course for which you apply.

We may consider a standalone AS in a relevant subject, if it is taken along with other A Levels and if an A Level has not been taken in the same subject. However, you will not be disadvantaged if you do not have a standalone AS subject as we will not ordinarily use them in our offers.

60 credits (with a minimum of 45 credits achieved at level 3) in a relevant subject.

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

24

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

UCAS Tariff

104-120

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points, primarily from Level 3 equivalent qualifications, such as A levels, a BTEC Extended Diploma or a Foundation Diploma, or current, relevant experience. Grade 4 (or C) or above in GCSE English Language, or equivalent, is a minimum language requirement for all applicants. Due to the creative nature of our courses, you will be considered on your own individual merit and potential to succeed on your chosen course. Please contact the Applicant Services team for advice if you are predicted UCAS points below this range, or if you have questions about the qualifications or experience you have.

a minimum of 40 UCAS tariff points, when combined with a minimum of 64 UCAS tariff points from the Supporting Qualifications

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Computer games

Join a community of people who live and breathe games. From day one you’ll be working as you would on a games team in the industry and developing your own games.

You’ll learn how all the specialisms work together, how to work effectively in a team and the role you play in it. The course simulates industry operations and methodologies in a professional environment, built to mirror a real games development studio.

Modules

Year one
You'll learn what it takes to make a game - asset creation, project management and pipelines, pitching ideas, and theories exploring what games are and how they engage players. Developing your skills and aligning them to your chosen route, you’ll enhance cross-disciplinary groups as you pitch a game to tutors and build it together.

Modules
Development Principles
Theory 1: Reading Experiences
Multidisciplinary Development Practice
Specialist modules depending on your route

Specialist modules
Art:
Environment Art 1
Environment Art 2

Animation:
Game Animation 1
Game Animation 2

Audio:
Designing Sound
Music Technologies

Design:
Game Design 1
Game Design 2

Programming:
Principles of Computing
Creative Computing
Individual Creative Computing Project

Writing:
Craft of Writing
Audiences & Contexts

Year two
With greater confidence in your skills, you’ll mirror professional game development as you tackle a larger game project in a multi-skilled group. Made over the entire year, you’ll research and experiment with various approaches and create innovative features. You’ll investigate strategies in player experience, and learn what drives industry trends and developments from visiting professionals, all the while developing the specialist skills informing your practice.

Modules
World Creation Project: Pre-Production
World Creation Project: Production
World Creation: Game Development Project 1
Theory 2: Form & Player Experience
Specialist modules depending on your route

Specialist modules
Art:
Developing Specialist Game Art Practice
Developing Concept Art Vocabularies
Developing Character Art Vocabularies
Developing Environment Art Vocabularies

Animation:
Game Animation 3
Developing Specialist Game Art Practice

Audio:
Supersonic
Developing Specialist Game Development Practice

Design:
Game Design 3
Developing Specialist Game Development Practice

Programming:
Specialisms in Creative Computing
Individual Specialist Computing Project: Interfaces & Interaction
Individual Specialist Computing Project: Artificial Intelligence

Writing:
Games and Digital Writing Workshop
Developing Specialist Game Development Practice

Year three
You’ll produce a complete and potentially publishable game as part of a team. By pitching it to industry professionals, you’ll receive reliable and insightful feedback. You’ll also research a topic relevant to your project, and work with industry mentors, sharpening your real-world insights and building valuable career contacts.

Modules
Preparing for the Future
Major Game Development Project: Pre-Production
Professional Practice
Major Game Development Project: Production

The modules above are those being studied by our students, or proposed new ones. Programme structures and modules can change as part of our curriculum enhancement and review processes. If a certain module is important to you, please discuss it with the Course Leader.

Assessment methods

Teamwork features heavily to reflect the industry.
Game making is the primary form of assessment.
Continuous assessment with no formal examinations.
Visual, verbal and written assignments.
Portfolio of project work.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£16,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Penryn Campus

Department:

The Games Academy

TEF rating:

Calculate your living costs

See how much you'll need to live on at your chosen university, with our student budget calculator.

See your living costs
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

74%
med
Computer games

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer games and animation

Teaching and learning

78%
Staff make the subject interesting
89%
Staff are good at explaining things
87%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
86%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

92%
Library resources
78%
IT resources
95%
Course specific equipment and facilities
64%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

89%
UK students
11%
International students
81%
Male students
19%
Female students
73%
2:1 or above
6%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
D
A

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer games and animation

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

100%
high
Employed or in further education
96%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

30%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
26%
Information technology and telecommunications professionals
13%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is a relatively new subject area for this kind of data, so we don’t currently have very much information to display or analyse yet. Gaming is a growing industry, and if it continues to grow we should see the rather high unemployment rate coming down over the next few years. Much the most common jobs for graduates who do get work after six months are in programming roles - but as things stand, be aware that jobs in the field are very competitive and personal contacts - either through family, friends or via specialist employment agencies - are a crucial way into the industry so be prepared to talk as well as code!

Share this page

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here