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University of South Wales

History (Including Foundation Year)

UCAS Code: V10F

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

E,E

Combinations with other listed qualifications are acceptable and others not listed may also be acceptable – please contact enquiries@southwales.ac.uk.

Access to HE Diploma

P:45

Pass Diploma with 60 credits overall to include 45 level 3 credits all Passes. The remaining 15 credits will be level 2 or ungraded. Combinations of credits amounting to the same tariff points are acceptable – if you have any questions please contact enquiries@southwales.ac.uk.”

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

PPP

Combinations with other listed qualifications are acceptable and others not listed may also be acceptable – please contact enquiries@southwales.ac.uk.

UCAS Tariff

32

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

50%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

History

The BA (Hons) History is also available as a four year course including an integrated Foundation Year, and is designed for students who do not currently meet admissions criteria for direct entry onto the degree.

You will start by completing a foundation year, which provides well structured support, allowing you to develop your skills and knowledge before continuing onto a three year degree programme.
History is essential to understanding ourselves and the world in which we live. It’s not about the ‘dead past’. After all, we’re not at the end of history; we’re in the middle of it. Our History degree will offer you new perspectives on the past. You’ll examine history from the close of the European middle ages to the present day.

USW’s History degree covers British and European history, the Americas from the colonial period to the present, and aspects of global history from Chile to China and back again. We place emphasis on ‘doing’ history. This means developing your skills in gathering and evaluating evidence, and learning how to build arguments that are rational and well-presented.

Modules

During the Foundation Year (Humanities) you will study the following compulsory modules:
•Study Skills
•Investigative Project
•English
•History

You will also study two modules from the following options:
•Media and Cultural Studies
•Statistics/Further Mathematics
•Psychology

Course and module overview:

Compulsory Modules

Study Skills

The module will provide the learner with opportunities to explore their examination and revision techniques and overall planning along with furthering their written and discussion skills. Skills addressed would include note taking, essay writing, discussions, referencing, planning assignments and revising for examinations, whilst also recognising different approaches to studying.

Investigative Project

To enable the learner to become competent researching, planning and writing an independent interdisciplinary project. The learner will develop oral presentation skills and deliver and evaluate an oral presentation.

English

English Studies combines a variety of units that focus on the processes of reading and writing. Students are encouraged to take a close look at how different meanings are created through a close study of author’s work in units such as “Introduction to Poetry”, “Reading Novels”, and a study of Shakespeare. Further, there is an opportunity to study these and other forms such as journalism, blogging etc. to produce work in the Creative Writing unit.

History

This module focuses on development of the historical skills of investigation, analysis of primary sources, recognition of key debates and contending perspectives and presentation of findings. You will develop a competence in using a range of sources including sites and buildings, museums, census data, social surveys, election manifestos, oral and written testimonies and archive film to ask questions of, and understand, the past. These skills are developed through studying three discrete topics: the development of local towns from the Celto-Roman period to post-industrial society; war and social change in the twentieth century; and the ‘swinging’ sixties. From the beginning of the course, the emphasis is on ‘doing’ history and on presenting your findings through a variety of formats including oral presentations, a research project and essays.

Optional Modules

Statistics / Further Maths

You will study a number of topics during this module including Introductory Statistics, Algebraic Techniques and Introductory Calculus.

Psychology

Psychology is the study of behaviour and this module will investigate the development of behaviour throughout the life span, from birth right up to older adulthood. Through a variety of real life case studies and your own piece of psychological research, you will examine what happens when things work out positively (attachment and bonds, pro social behaviour), and also what can happen when things don’t work out as expected (mental health issues, anti-social behaviour).

Media and Cultural Studies

Culture and Media Studies offers a close look at a number of important organisations, practices and issues, and explores the ways in which they work, including their impact upon our society. You will study topics including “What is News?”, “Advertising, Shopping and Consumerism”, “Images and Representations” and “Does Violent Media Create a Violent Society”. Media and Cultural Studies is aimed at getting behind the stories in the headlines and asking what these tell us about the world that we live in, and the cultures of which we are a part.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,000
per year
EU
£9,000
per year
International
£12,600
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,000
per year
Scotland
£9,000
per year
Wales
£9,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Pontypridd

Department:

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

62%
low
History

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

History

Teaching and learning

89%
Staff make the subject interesting
94%
Staff are good at explaining things
78%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
64%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

58%
Library resources
89%
IT resources
36%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

After graduation


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You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

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It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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