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University of Manchester

Linguistics and Russian

UCAS Code: QR17

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


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About this course


Course option

4years

Full-time | 2019

Subjects

Linguistics

Russian studies

This course will introduce you to the study of the unique human faculty of language and to the investigation of the world's languages. You will explore a number of fascinating topics such as the ways in which dialects differ, how languages arise, change and die, how children acquire their first language, differences between the speech of men and women, how we communicate as individuals and within groups, and what happens when speakers of different languages come into contact.

You will also discover how language can be used to shape and manipulate ideas and opinions, looking in detail at how language and thought interact in fields such as politics and advertising. In addition, you will practise key transferable skills, such as essay writing and how to give a presentation.

Students may apply to spend one semester studying abroad during the second year of their degree. Exchange partners are offered through the Worldwide Exchange scheme.

Studies in Russian will enable students to develop their Russian language skills to a superior level, while also developing their interests in and knowledge of a variety of other subject areas (such as film and media studies, sociology, history and politics, literary and cultural studies).

Students will be provided with a broad grounding in Russian area studies, with an emphasis on the integrated study of language, culture and society.

**Special Features**

- We have a virtually unique breadth of subject areas and theoretical approaches.

- We have expertise in, and course units devoted to, a wide range of languages and language families including the Romance languages, the Germanic languages, languages of the Near East (e.g. Arabic and Hebrew), Iranian languages, the indigenous languages of Australia, Central and South America (e.g. Mexico, Nicaragua and Peru), languages of South Asia (e.g. Nepal, India and Tibet), and Romani.

- Particular strengths include the linguistics of English (both synchronic and diachronic), endangered languages and field linguistics, phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax (especially Lexical-Functional Grammar and Construction Grammar), typology, language contact and sociolinguistics, historical linguistics (esp. English, Romance and Germanic), semantics and pragmatics, corpus and child language acquisition.

- Manchester is an international centre for linguistics and English language, with a range of lively activity. See the following link for recent news around the department: https://manling.wordpress.com/

- Language courses are team-taught by native speakers of Russian and English-speakers with a superior command of Russian; these courses are supplemented by structured independent language-learning activities

- There are separate language pathways for beginners and post-A level students in the first two years of study. You will have access to a wide range of Russian cultural and social events that further your study of Russian language and culture outside the classroom.

- Key features of the programme include: intensive Russian language courses, including an optional final-year Business Russian course; an interdisciplinary core content course (Year 1) with a multimedia focus and integrated training both in crucial study skills and in concrete transferable skills.

Extra funding

The University is committed to supporting students from low-income households through our financial support packages detailed below. Full-time UK students do not need to apply for Manchester’s bursaries separately but should ensure that they consent to share their financial details with the University when making an application to Student Finance England. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/student-finance/2019/

The Uni


Course location:

University of Manchester

Department:

School of Arts, Languages and Cultures

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

78%
med
Linguistics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Linguistics

Teaching and learning

81%
Staff make the subject interesting
94%
Staff are good at explaining things
89%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
68%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

90%
Library resources
97%
IT resources
95%
Course specific equipment and facilities
72%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

72%
UK students
28%
International students
24%
Male students
76%
Female students
89%
2:1 or above
7%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

Slavic studies

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

81%
UK students
19%
International students
37%
Male students
63%
Female students
90%
2:1 or above
11%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A
B
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Linguistics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,000
low
Average annual salary
93%
low
Employed or in further education
80%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

19%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
10%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
9%
Media professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is not a particularly common subject at first degree level and most of the degrees that fall in this category are offered by the University of Durham. If you fancy one of these broad degrees, it is probably best to speak directly to tutors to find out what your options on your degree might be and what they can lead to,

Slavic studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
73%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

17%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
10%
Teaching and educational professionals
10%
Other elementary services occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is a small, general category covering several different subject areas - so bear that in mind when you look at any stats. The most common courses covered here are in translation, with just 55 students graduating in translation degrees in 2015. The arts were the most likely job sector for graduates from these courses, but it's a good idea to go to university open days to ask tutors more specific questions about what previous graduates typically went on to do with their degree.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Linguistics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£23k

£23k

£27k

£27k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Russian studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£23k

£23k

£27k

£27k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here