We use cookies to allow us and selected partners to improve your experience and our advertising. By continuing to browse you consent to our use of cookies. You can understand more and change your cookies preferences here.

University of Cambridge

Natural Sciences

UCAS Code: BCF0

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

A*,A*,A

Typical A Level offer: A*A*A All Colleges require: A Levels in at least two science/mathematics subjects (please note that some Year 1 options have specific subject requirements) Some Colleges require: AS or A Level in a third science/mathematics subject and/or particular subjects (see individual College websites for details)

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

40-42

776 at Higher Level All Colleges require: Higher Levels in at least two science/mathematics subjects (please note that some Year 1 options have specific subject requirements) Some Colleges require: Standard or Higher Level in a third science/mathematics subject and/or particular subjects (see individual College websites for details)

UCAS Tariff

160

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

26%
Applicants receiving offers

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subjects

Materials science

Biological sciences

Earth sciences

Chemistry

Physics

At Cambridge, as well as being a member of the University, you're also a member of a College. All Colleges admit students for a wide range of different courses and so you will have a number of Colleges to choose from - or if you really don’t mind you can make an Open application and we will allocate one to you. You can use the course options tab above to navigate through the different Colleges which offer this course.

Natural Sciences is the framework within which most science subjects are taught at Cambridge, offering a wide range of physical and biological science subjects from 16 departments in a unique and demanding course. A broad first year is combined with increasing specialisation in the second year, and the possibility of total specialisation from the third year.

Some third-year specialisms offer a fourth year option, leading to an MSci degree (progression to the fourth year is dependent on satisfactory performance).

The Uni


Course locations:

Wolfson

Lucy Cavendish

Girton

Hughes Hall

Sidney Sussex

Clare

Christ's

Emmanuel

Corpus Christi

Peterhouse

Pembroke

Trinity Hall

St Catharine's

Downing

Queens'

St Edmund's

Churchill

St John's

Homerton

Newnham

Trinity

Fitzwilliam

King's

Jesus

Murray Edwards

Gonville & Caius

Robinson

Open application

Selwyn

Magdalene

Department:

Interdepartmental

TEF rating:

Calculate your living costs

See how much you'll need to live on at your chosen university, with our student budget calculator.

See your living costs
Read full university profile

What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Materials science

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

39%
UK students
61%
International students
68%
Male students
32%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A*
A*
A*

Biological sciences

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Earth sciences

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

69%
UK students
31%
International students
59%
Male students
41%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A*
A*
A*

Chemistry

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

42%
UK students
58%
International students
59%
Male students
41%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A*
A*
A*

Physics

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

44%
UK students
56%
International students
82%
Male students
18%
Female students

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

A*
A*
A*

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Materials science

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

0%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This subject isn't very common for undergraduates — so bear that in mind when you review the stats. Many people studying in this fast-moving and often very specialist area take a first degree in another subject and then do a postgraduate course in materials science, and so not many went into work in the UK last year. If you're interested specifically in polymers or textiles, then there is the option to study it as a degree on its own. Because these degrees are very specialist, starting salaries for graduates are pretty good though, so if you fancy something a bit different and cutting-edge, this might be worth thinking about.

Biosciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

3%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

These stats refer to the prospects of graduates from general courses in biosciences. About a quarter go into further study and for those who go into work, bioscience, teaching and finance jobs are the most common types of employment. But you can go into most careers with this kind of degree — the majority of jobs for graduates don’t ask for a particular degree subject - and you will acquire a wide range of skills valued by many employers. If you want to find out more specifically about the prospects for your chosen subject, it might be a good idea to go on open days and talk to tutors about what previous graduates from your chosen subject went on to do.

Earth sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

0%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Chemistry

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

0%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Chemistry graduates are in demand from a wide range of industries, from the food, oil, chemicals and pharmaceuticals to consultancy, technical analysis and teaching. They're also prized by business and finance employers for their research and data handling skills — anywhere there is research and data to be explained, you can find chemistry grads. If you want a career in research, you need a doctorate, so start planning now if you fancy one of these exciting and challenging jobs - but good students can usually get grants to take a doctorate, so don't worry about the financing if you think you have what it takes. The recession wasn’t too kind to chemists, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry (one of the key employers for chemists), but things are getting back to normal for this flexible group and it's one of the few degrees that is bucking the current trend and increasing graduate numbers.

Physics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

0%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Although the subject has seen a bit of resurgence in recent years, the UK is still felt to be short of physics graduates, and in particular physicists training as teachers. If you want a career in physics research — in all sorts of areas, from atmospheric physics to lasers - you'll probably need to take a doctorate, and so have a think about where you would like to do that and how you might fund it (the government funds many physics doctorates, so you might not find it as hard as you think). With that in mind, it's not surprising that just over a fifth of physics graduates go on to take doctorates when they finish their degree, and well over a third of physicists take some kind of postgraduate study in total. Physics is highly regarded and surprisingly versatile, which is why physics graduates who decide not to stay in education are more likely to go into well-paid jobs in the finance industry than they are to go into science. The demand and versatility of physics degrees goes to explain why they're amongst the best-paid science graduates.

Share this page

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here