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University of Plymouth

Criminology & Criminal Justice Studies with Law

UCAS Code: M214

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


104 UCAS Tariff points, including a minimum of 2 A Levels. General Studies is not accepted.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

Pass a named Access to HE Diploma with 33 Level 3 credits at Merit and/or Distinction. Any subject is considered.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

26

To include a Grade 4 in any subject at Higher Level. English and Maths accepted within as GCSE equivalent.

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H3,H3,H4,H4,H4

Any subjects are considered. English and Maths accepted within as GCSE equivalent.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

D*D

Any subject is considered.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

Any subject is considered.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

104 UCAS Tariff points, including a minimum of 2 Advanced Highers. English and Maths accepted as GCSE equivalent.

Considered in combination with Advanced Highers.

UCAS Tariff

104

Including a minimum of 2 A Levels. General Studies is not accepted.

Considered in combination with other qualifications.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2019

Subjects

Law

Criminal law

Put your incisive mind and probing skills to best use as a decision-maker, policy developer or in assisting in the treatment of offenders. This course helps you develop the analytical and practical skills to examine how and why people commit crime and how we as a society deal with criminality. Youll also develop your legal skills, studying the English legal system and method, law in context and choices from a wide range of other legal subjects.You will stand out from the crowd with a Certificate in Knowledge of Policing. You will boost your employability and gain hands-on experience by volunteering with local and national criminal justice agencies. Youll also be eligible for entry into our Graduate Diploma in Law programme, enabling you to convert your degree to a 'qualifying' law degree.* Make a difference draw on our inter-disciplinary approach to study, with a focus on contemporary issues, to gain real insight into the nature of crime, the workings of the criminal justice system and the society around you, and equip yourself with the skills to bring about change.* Equip yourself with in-demand skills our graduates are highly sought after by a range of criminal justice agencies, including the police, probation, prison and youth justice services or find careers as paralegals and legal executives.* Boost your employability and gain hands-on experience by volunteering with local and national criminal justice agencies. * Open doors to a career in the private, public or third sector highly transferable skills mean youll find career opportunities in a diverse range of settings.* Your Law minor means youll be eligible for entry into our Graduate Diploma in Law programme, enabling you to convert your degree to a 'qualifying' law degree.* To complement your formal learning we offer regular PALS sessions that provide the opportunity for you to learn with and from your peers. Share knowledge, discuss ideas, and ask questions in a relaxed and friendly environment.

Modules

In your first year, you’ll lay the foundations for your studies, exploring perspectives on criminology and examining theories on causes of crime and deviance. You’ll develop an understanding of the criminal justice process in England and Wales, and gain a grounding in criminal justice research, examining crime in the context of economic, political and social frameworks. You’ll also be introduced to the key areas of law and gain an understanding of the English, EU and international legal systems.

In your second year you’ll broaden your skills – from learning how to assess, collect and use statistics, surveys, interviews and observational studies in researching crime and criminal justice, to examining theories of criminology alongside contemporary social, communications and cultural theories, urban studies, international relations and social harm. You’ll also have a choice of law modules including consumer law, tort and human rights.

In your final year, you’ll design and implement your own research project to produce your dissertation, working independently with the support of a member of our academic team. Choose from a variety of modules such as comparative studies, policing illicit drug use, anti-social behaviour, racism and criminal justice. Law options include criminal law, parents and children, media and information law, environmental law, European business law, and business regulation and corporate governance.

The modules shown for this course or programme are those being studied by current students, or expected new modules. Modules are subject to change depending on year of entry.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Plymouth

Department:

School of Law, Criminology and Government

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

81%
med
Law
81%
med
Criminal law

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

Teaching and learning

82%
Staff make the subject interesting
93%
Staff are good at explaining things
85%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
88%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

85%
Library resources
85%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
82%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

87%
UK students
13%
International students
38%
Male students
62%
Female students
76%
2:1 or above
9%
Drop out rate

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Law

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,500
low
Average annual salary
98%
med
Employed or in further education
98%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

42%
Legal associate professionals
9%
Other elementary services occupations
6%
Functional managers and directors
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Law graduates tend to go into the legal industry, and they usually take similar routes. Jobs are competitive — often very competitive - but starting salaries are good and high fliers can earn serious money - starting on over £24k in London on average. Be aware though - some careers, especially as barristers, can take a while to get into, and the industry is changing as the Internet, automation and economic change all have an effect, If you want to qualify to practise law, you need to take a professional qualification — many law graduates then go on to law school. If you want to go into work, then a lot of law graduates take trainee or paralegal roles and some do leave the law altogether, often for jobs in management, finance and the police force. A small proportion of law graduates also move into another field for further study. Management, accountancy and teaching are all popular for these career changers, so if you do take a law degree and decide it’s not for you, there are options.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Criminal law

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£20k

£20k

£22k

£22k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here