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Keele University

Biology and Psychology

UCAS Code: CC81

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

A,B,C-B,B,B

To include 1 Science A-level (Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Human Biology, Maths, Physics, Psychology, Sports Science or Statistics).

Access to HE Diploma

D:30

122 UCAS Tariff points including a minimum of 30 Level 3 credits at Distinction. To include sufficient Science units. Please contact us for advice.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSE English Language at grade C (or 4) and Maths at grade C (or 4).

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

32

To include Higher Level Science at 6 or above. To include 1 Science A-level (Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geography, Geology, Human Biology, Maths, Physics, Psychology, Sports Science or Statistics).

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

To be in a Science based subject, please contact us for advice.

UCAS Tariff

120

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3years

Full-time | 2019

Other options

4 years | Sandwich with time abroad | 2019

Subjects

Biology

Psychology

At Keele University, we’re different. Nestled in 600 acres of countryside in the heart of the UK, we have a big campus but a small and cosmopolitan community. We’re proud to be ‘University of the Year for Student Experience’ in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017, in addition to having been ranked No.1 in the National Student Survey 2014-2016. This is because it’s more than green and lovely, it’s a place of research and academic excellence too.At Keele, studying a combined honours degree will include some modules from both of the single honours degrees. In this case, your programme will be made up of a combination of modules from both Biology and Psychology.

This popular combination integrates an understanding of our biology and physiology with the more holistic and behavioural approach of psychology. You will choose from a variety of modules in both subjects, spanning social psychology, cognitive psychology, biological psychology and research methods. You will examine the diversity of life and its evolution from the geological past and exploring the behaviour and physiology of whole organisms. In Psychology, you will study social and developmental psychology, cognitive and biological psychology and research methods.
In Biology you learn about the amazing world of organisms – from how they’ve evolved to their relationships with the environment and each other. You’ll consider the complexity of biological processes and mechanisms at molecular, cellular, organismal and ecosystem levels, exploring related philosophical and ethical issues. You’ll sample, record and analyse data in the field and in our excellent labs, and learn how biology can improve the quality and sustainability of life.
In your final year you will carry out a research project in each subject under the expert guidance of an academic staff member. Examples include the psychological impact of pain or stress, the effects of sleep duration on recall, the detrimental effects of school bullying, the effects of group housing on learning in rats, the behaviour of thrips larvae or how small mammals can be tracked in the wild. You’ll benefit from a supportive environment as well as fantastic lab facilities and equipment.

The psychology modules on this course are accredited by the British Psychological Society, a necessary first step for many professional careers in psychology, such as clinical, counselling, educational, forensic, occupational or sports psychology, and a prerequisite to becoming a Chartered Psychologist. Combining psychology and biology prepares students for these psychology careers as well as becoming a research scientist, an environmental consultant, conservationist, working in quality control areas of the food industry, in the pharmaceutical industry or as a scientific writer.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Keele University

Department:

Keele (Central)

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

82%
med
Biology
83%
med
Psychology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Biology (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

85%
Staff make the subject interesting
92%
Staff are good at explaining things
86%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
82%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

83%
Library resources
89%
IT resources
88%
Course specific equipment and facilities
73%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

92%
UK students
8%
International students
45%
Male students
55%
Female students
82%
2:1 or above
5%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C

Psychology (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

85%
Staff make the subject interesting
95%
Staff are good at explaining things
82%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
77%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

87%
Library resources
92%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
89%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
22%
Male students
78%
Female students
86%
2:1 or above
6%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Biology (non-specific)

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£19,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
95%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

22%
Natural and social science professionals
20%
Science, engineering and production technicians
12%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The recession was tough on biology graduates, and although the jobs market has improved for them - a lot - it's still not back to where it was a few years ago. If you want a career in biology research — and a lot of biology students do - you'll need to take a doctorate, so give some thought as to where you might do it and how you might fund it (the government still funds doctorates for good students). A lot of graduates also take 1 year Masters courses to specialise in this wide and deep subject - most students take a standard biology course for their first degree and then specialise in subjects like ecology, conservation or marine biology later. Hospitals, universities, biotech firms, zoos and nature reserves and clinical and scientific testing are common industries of employment for biology graduates.

Psychology (non-specific)

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£17,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
78%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

18%
Caring personal services
15%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
8%
Other elementary services occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

20 years ago, this was a specialist degree for would-be psychologists but now it is the model of a modern, flexible degree subject. One of the UK's fastest-growing subject at degree level, and the second most popular subject overall (it recently overtook business studies), one in 23 of all graduates last year had psychology degrees. As you'd expect with figures like that, jobs in psychology itself are incredibly competitive, so to stand a chance of securing one, you need to get a postgraduate qualification (probably a doctorate in most fields, especially clinical psychology) and some relevant work experience. But even though there are so many psychology graduates — far more than there are jobs in psychology, and over 13,800 in total last year — this degree has a lower unemployment rate than average because its grads are so flexible and well-regarded by business and other industries across the economy. Everywhere there are good jobs in the UK economy, you'll find psychology graduates - and it's hardly surprising as the course helps you gain a mix of good people skills and excellent number and data handling skills. A psychology degree ticks most employers' boxes — but we'd suggest you don't drop your maths modules.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Biology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£17k

£17k

£20k

£20k

£25k

£25k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Psychology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£17k

£17k

£18k

£18k

£24k

£24k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here