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University Centre Grimsby

Photography

UCAS Code: W640

Foundation Degree in Arts - FdA

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

80
67%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

2years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Photography

Photography is an exciting, historically important and culturally significant medium. Our FdA in Photography is designed to appeal to anyone with an enthusiasm for photography. The course aims to balance study of commercial photography with an exploration of the broader importance of photography in documenting the world around us – and its significance as a form of personal expression – in non-commercial genres such as documentary, fine art or street photography. The course thus balances a consideration of the commercial potential of photography with the important role photography plays as a means of personal and cultural expression. Whilst the commercial element within photographic practice is undeniably important, the medium’s potential to document and explore society, and to allow individuals to express themselves creatively, is equally important – and since its origins, the history of photography has been dominated by this tension between the industrial / commercial and corporate application of photographic practice and extension of photographic practice by vernacular, documentary and fine art forms and practitioners. The degree will provide you with experience of working in commercial genres such as advertising and industrial photography, whilst also giving you the opportunity to explore the worlds of fine art, street and documentary photography. In addition, you will have the opportunity of studying the history of photography, and examining the work of important and contemporary photographers.

The degree is welcoming to people from all backgrounds, both traditional progressors and those returning to education as mature students. Entrants onto our degree level photography provision have in the past come from many different backgrounds: you may simply be an enthusiastic amateur, or you may already work as a photographer. However, regardless of your background, whether you are intending on pursuing a career within commercial photography, establishing your own business or seeking work as a freelancer, our course aims to build on your enthusiasm for the subject, giving you confidence in your abilities whilst providing you with the knowledge and skills necessary to practice or study photography at a higher level.

During your time on the course, you will be given the opportunity of working with both analogue (film-based) and digital formats, and you will be able to practise using our equipment – including our studio and darkroom facilities. During your second year, you will be asked to design, plan and produce your own extended independent project, which you will self-publish, giving you something which can be used to help market yourself as a photographer upon completing the degree.

The aims for the programme are: (i) to facilitate an appreciation of the importance of photography both as a medium of cultural and personal expression and as a form with a commercial and artistic application; (ii) to provide a forum in which students may develop the technical skills needed to practice photography as a means of both personal and cultural expression and within a commercial context; (iii) to highlight the manner in which photography may be used to document the world around us and the complications that arise from this, enabling students to contextualise their own photographic practice; (iv) to foster a comprehension of the history of photography and how photography as a medium has been impacted on by social and cultural developments, relating this to the student’s own practice of the medium of photography; (v) To enable the development of transferable skills of critical thinking, problem-solving, analysis and evaluation, visual judgement, and self-reflexivity and independence of thought, emphasising employability and skills that are both valued by employers and which underpin progression to study at honours and postgraduate level.

Modules

Modules at Level 4 are intended to introduce you to core skills and key concepts whilst allowing you freedom to find you own approach within whatever types of photography interest you. At Level 4, you will study the following modules: (i) Photography Skills and Studio Skills, in which you will be introduced to the equipment and given opportunity to practise using it; (ii) Understanding Photographs, which will provide you with a comprehension of how photographs ‘work’ in communicating meaning to their audiences; (iii) Digital Workflow Systems, in which you will learn how to use modern professional software to manage, manipulate and archive photographs; (iv) Reportage: Photojournalism and Press Photography, a module focusing on photojournalism that will enable you to practise work in this exciting field of photography; (v) The History of Photography, in which we will examine the history and evolution of the medium; and (vi) Study Skills and Employability, where you will practise the skills you need to succeed in your degree-level studies whilst also reflecting on some of the context in which photographers work.

Modules at Level 5 are designed to provide you with a balance of practising photography within commercial genres against exploring the potential for non-commercial genres to extend the boundaries of photography. These modules are: (i) Advertising and Industrial Photography, in which you will examine these two commercial genres of photography and produce work conforming to their demands; (ii) The Camera as Storyteller: Documentary and Street Photography, a module focusing on documentary forms of photography and which considers the importance of storytelling to documentary / street photography, both in the form of single images and as photo essays; (iii) Authorship in Photography, in which we will look at the work of key photographers; (iv) Simulating a Commercial Context: Working to a Live Brief, which will ask you to interpret a brief provided by a simulated client; (v) Critical and Conceptual Practice: Self-Directed Project, in which you will be asked to produce an independent project in a form / on a topic of your choice and self-publlish it; (vi) Representation and Audience, a module examining how photography is shaped by its cultural contexts, and how in turn photography shapes society.

Modules focused on photographic practice are intended to provide you with an appropriate skillset and a working methodology which, combined with a flexibility of approach, should be sufficient to enable you to enter into a career in photography, whether in the employ of others or via self-employment / entrepreneurship. These modules are focused on a number of genres, both commercial and artistic – including photojournalism and press photography, portraiture, advertising photography, industrial photography, fine art photography and documentary / street photography. These modules will be delivered alongside an ethos grounded in the principles of work-related learning; foregrounded at Level 5, the ethos of work-related learning will be presented to students via the setting of ‘live’, client-led briefs in appropriate modules (notably the modules Advertising and Industrial Photography and Work Based Activity) and a simulation of work-based contexts.

Assessment methods

Assessment on the programme will be via the production of both individual photographs and sequences of images, including photo essays. Some modules will expect you to work towards a simulated ‘live brief’. Other modules will give you the freedom to select your own topic or issue and produce work which you will then be required to self-publish and submit in the form of a book. Alongside these methods of assessment, you will be asked to complete traditional academic assessments in the form of essays, both short- and long-form.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£8,500
per year
England
£8,500
per year
EU
£8,500
per year
Northern Ireland
£8,500
per year
Scotland
£8,500
per year
Wales
£8,500
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Nuns Corner Campus

Department:

HE Creative and Digital

TEF rating:

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What students say


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Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Photography

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£11k

£11k

£14k

£14k

£11k

£11k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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