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De Montfort University

Software Engineering

UCAS Code: G600

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

UCAS Tariff

112

from at least 2 A-Levels Five GCSEs 9-4 including English Language and Mathematics or equivalent.

91%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Computer science

Software Engineering BSc (Hons) at De Montfort University will teach you the theoretical and practical aspects of software development, database design and web technologies and gaining an awareness of professional practice and social responsibility. The course covers a variety of subjects to understand the fundamental principles of Software Engineering and also includes discrete mathematics, programming language concepts, software design methods, secure web systems, computer architecture and computer networks. The course is accredited by the BCS (Chartered Institute for IT), which ensures that you gain industry-standard training and skills and are prepared for employment upon graduation. Software Engineering is aligned with the Computer Science BSc (Hons) course and has common modules for the first two years. The course also shares a common first year with Computer Security BSc (Hons), providing you with the flexibility to transfer between courses after the first year if you wish. 90% of our Software Engineering graduates from summer 2017 are in work or further study after graduating according to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) 2016-17 report.

Modules

First year
Core modules:
Computer Programming I
Computer Programming II
Computer Ethics
Computer Law and Cyber Security
Computer Systems
Computer Networks
Mathematics for Computing
Mathematics for Computing
Database Design and Implementation

Second year modules:
Software and Security Management
Object Oriented Design
Object Oriented Development
Web Application Development
Agile Team Development
Data Structures and Algorithms
Concurrent and Parallel Algorithms
Introduction to Research

Third year modules:

Computing Project – The project provides students with the opportunity to carry out a significant piece of work involving critical analysis and reflection to provide an effective solution to a given technical and/or research-based problem. It enables students to apply and integrate previous material covered on the student's course as well as to extend the work covered on the course through research and self-learning. Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate and proactive project management, and written/verbal presentation skills throughout the period of the project. As well as analysing, designing, delivering and appraising a product of suitable quality, they will be expected to undertake, research, analyse, design, evaluate and report on some aspects of a subject explicitly allied to the project.
Systems Building: Methods – This module covers an important aspect of Information Systems Development (ISD): the selection and evaluation of methodologies used in the Systems Development process.

Rigorous Systems – This module introduces the role of formal systems in rigorous software development and develops base-level skills using a contemporary formal method. The module covers the essential theoretical material (rationale, syntax, semantics) and provides practical experience using an appropriate software development tool.
The module is based on the formal specification language ITL.

Optional modules:

Fuzzy Logic and Knowledge Based Systems
Secure Web Application Development – This module assumes a sound understanding of PHP. This will have been gained through previous study or significant commercial experience of web development.
Many modern computer services are now accessed via the ubiquitous web-browser, and users have come to expect instant and secure access to information on a wide range of platforms. Underpinning these web systems is usually a web application, providing a channel to data stored in databases. However, increasingly the web-site has also become a point of entry for unauthorised access to stored data. This is often the result of poor web application design and/or implementation.
The module considers how a web application may be designed and implemented in such a way as to reduce the likelihood of unauthorised access to information. This also requires an understanding of the more common forms of browser-based attacks and the coding techniques that can be used to defend against these.
Web Application Penetration Testing – Web Application Penetration Testing aims to unearth the vulnerable areas in web applications before the hackers do. Basing the testing upon a recognised methodology helps to ensure that the majority of well known vulnerabilities are discovered and mitigation implemented before potentially disastrous consequences occur.
Telematics
Multi-service Networks I
Multi-service Networks II
Functional Software Development
Front-End Web Development
Interaction Design
Database Management and Programming
Information Technology Services Practice
Computer Ethics and Privacy
Data Mining
Big Data and Business Models

Assessment methods

During the course you will benefit from learning informed by research. Our leading research Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility provides the basis for the ethical computing content of the course, ensuring that your learning is at the cutting edge of recent developments.
Our Software Technology Research Laboratory provides material for the final year module on rigorous systems and has helped to develop the second year concurrent and distributed systems topics. The Cyber Security Centre (CSC) has developed computer security material for the course content that is relevant to practice.

During the first year you will be able to attend guest lectures from invited speakers from industry and academia that are part of the CSC’s guest lecture series.
In the first year, you will normally attend around 12-15 hours of timetabled taught sessions each week, split across a variety of lectures, small group activities and practical laboratory work.

A variety of assessment methods are used on the course, including short tests to provide rapid feedback and formal exams, held at the end of each academic year. Your written and academic reading skills will be developed in the ethics and law topics and you will develop a portfolio that will give you experience of practical development.

In the second year, the emphasis moves towards more substantive practical assignments and you will practise modern software development techniques. Research and presentation skills are also important in the second year.
In the final year, the individual software development project forms a major part of the practical assessment.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£14,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Leicester Campus

Department:

Computing, Engineering and Media

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

73%
med
Computer science

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer science

Teaching and learning

68%
Staff make the subject interesting
81%
Staff are good at explaining things
75%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
80%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

83%
Library resources
76%
IT resources
81%
Course specific equipment and facilities
70%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

80%
UK students
20%
International students
86%
Male students
14%
Female students
85%
2:1 or above
18%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer science

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,360
med
Average annual salary
98%
high
Employed or in further education
81%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

55%
Information technology and telecommunications professionals
11%
Information technology technicians
7%
Customer service occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is a newly-classified subject area for this kind of data, so we don’t currently have very much information to display or analyse yet. The subject is linked to important and growing computing industries, and over time we can expect more students to study them — there could be opportunities that open up for graduates in these subjects as the economy develops over the next few years.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Computer science

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£23k

£23k

£25k

£25k

£25k

£25k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here