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University of Worcester

Animal Biology and Ecology

UCAS Code: CC31
BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
BA (Hons) 6 years part-time 2017
BSc (Hons) 6 years part-time 2017
Ucas points guide

104-120

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Subjects
  • Biology
  • Zoology
Student score
83% MED
Not Available
% employed or in further study
98% HIGH
Not Available
Average graduate salary
£16k LOW
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

Biology and (Applied Science or Environmental Science or Chemistry or Any Science subject or Mathematics).

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
MMM

BTEC Certificate
DD

International Baccalaureate
24

UCAS tariff points
104-120

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 104-120 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£8,900

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Joint honours are ideal for students who wish to combine two areas of equal interest or who would benefit from the greater flexibility offered by studying the two subjects together. Animal Biology and Ecology make an excellent combination for students wishing to gain a greater understanding of animals and how they interact with the environment. Animal Biology is fully complemented by Ecology on this joint degree. For example, you will study the latest genetic techniques which are now an important part of modern ecology and conservation. Biology modules include: genetics and conservation, animal behaviour, animal senses and survival, genomics and bioinformatics. The Ecology modules allow you to learn about landscape and restoration ecology, applied GIS, and freshwater ecology, as well as developing survey skills specific to the sector. At the University of Worcester you will be provided with an unrivalled amount of hands-on ecological and biological experience, coupled with invaluable underpinning knowledge. Your learning will also be enhanced by Worcesterâ??s superb proximity to numerous sites of high wildlife value, including nature reserves, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs). Contrasting environments further afield can also be explored during a residential field trip to France. The Universityâ??s laboratories meet modern expectations for professional laboratories with two dedicated laboratories for student research in addition to those used for teaching. This Worcester course covers a wide range of topics from how to support pollinators in the UK, conserving orangutans in Borneo, genetics and conservation, to genomics & bioinformatics. The extensive range of modules available enables the course to be tailored to meet your own requirements. At Worcester, you get the degree you want.

Modules

Animal Biology Year 1: Biological diversity; cell biology; introduction to ecology; comparative animal physiology. Optional modules: Basis of biological surveying; introduction to molecular bioscience; human origins. Year 2: Molecular genetics and conservation; project and career development. Optional modules: Animal behaviour; animal senses and survival; microbiology; invertebrate biology; field techniques and identification skills; ecology of fresh waters; comparative human and animal digestion. Year 3: Independent study; physiological ecology; behavioural ecology. Optional modules: Mammalian reproduction; animal movement; animal welfare and ethics; parasitology; zoo-based conservation; genomics and bioinformatics. Ecology Year 1: Biological diversity; introduction to ecology; basics of biological surveying. Year 2: Conservation ecology of habitats and species; populations and community ecology; field techniques in ecology. Year 3: Independent study; restoration ecology; behavioural ecology; landscape ecology; residential ecology field course.

University of Worcester

The Hive Library

As the only higher education institution in Herefordshire and Worcestershire, we have a strong role to play in the region, delivering degree programmes to nearly 10, 000 students. Our campuses are all within walking distance of each other and close to the city centre. Worcester has undergone significant growth over the last few years, doubling our student numbers.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
33%
67%

Year 1

32%
68%

Year 2

22%
78%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
26%
69%
5%

Year 1

23%
71%
6%

Year 2

11%
82%
7%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 93%
Student score 83% MED
Able to access IT resources

86%

Staff made the subject interesting

95%

Library resources are satisfactory

71%

Feedback on work has been helpful

73%

Feedback on work has been prompt

72%

Staff are good at explaining things

92%

Received sufficient advice and support

88%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
7% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
56% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
7% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
293 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
71% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
10% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 98% HIGH
Average graduate salary £16k LOW
Graduates who are childcare and related personal services

10%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

7%

Graduates who are health associate professionals

7%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Things are improving - slowly - for biology graduates, so don't get too worried about the unemployment stats above, as they are normally more encouraging. If you want a career in biology research – and a lot of biology students do - you'll need to take a doctorate, so give some thought as to where you might do it and how you might fund it (the government still funds doctorates for good students). If you think you only want to do a first degree for now, there are jobs for biologists in science and clinical labs and in the health, food and water industries. But you can actually get all sorts of jobs with a biology degree – last year’s biology graduates got jobs in sectors ranging from PR to accountancy.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Zoology isn't just about working in zoos (although if you want one of these highly sought-after jobs, be prepared for some serious competition), because zoology graduates can be found in all sorts of jobs. Nearly a quarter of graduates take some kind of further qualification when they leave – mostly Masters degrees in zoology or related subjects, like biology or ecology – but a graduate from a zoology course can go into pretty much anything, with science, conservation, management, finance and marketing some of the most popular areas.
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