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University of West London

International Relations with Sociology

UCAS Code: L240

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


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About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

International relations

This course enables you to discover how political and social systems in the UK, Europe and beyond are organised, how governments function and how individuals and regimes get and employ power.

You will uncover how political structures emerge out of interactions between people and their values, ideas and institutions.
You will study history and theory to help you understand the present. The course has an emphasis on contemporary global problems with the aim of developing and applying:

• critical reading
• writing
• debating skills

You will graduate with many indispensable and transferrable skills, including effective communication, negotiation skills, a critical mindset and a solid grasp of the way the world works on the local, national as well as the global stage.
On this degree you will learn through analysing the historical development of contemporary political and social problems. You will seek to explore some of the solutions that have been proposed in the past. UWL is the career university, the BA (Hons) International Relations with Sociology will prepare you for professional employment.

The course is taught by research active staff who have practical as well as academic experience. Throughout the course you will be supported by a number of tutors who have a wide range of interests within the subject area. This will ensure that you are able to specialise in a specific area within international relations and sociology of interest to you. In your final year dissertation you will have the opportunity to study a particular topic in-depth.
All classes are taught in an engaging and participatory manner. You will be encouraged to try out what you have learned via a range of activities, such as:

• practical sessions
• workshop
• in-class debates
• creative reflection
• using on-line and other media

Furthermore, the personal tutoring system will ensure that you have the academic support you need throughout your course.

In your second year you will undertake ‘Working in Political and International Contexts’ placement which will enable you to develop a portfolio of work-based learning and experience. Throughout the module expert advice will be given about the different employment opportunities open to you as a result of taking this degree. Careers in international organisations, government, NGO’s, transnational charities and aid organisations will all be featured as possibilities for your future.

The Uni


Course location:

West London

Department:

School of Human and Social Sciences

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Social sciences

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
19%
Male students
81%
Female students
66%
2:1 or above
19%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
C
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Social sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,000
med
Average annual salary
96%
med
Employed or in further education
89%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

31%
Welfare professionals
9%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
7%
Protective service occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The numbers of people taking politics degrees fell sharply last year and we'll keep an eye on this one - it can't really be because of graduates getting poor outcomes as politics grads do about as well as graduates on average. Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Jobs in local and central government are also important. Other popular jobs include marketing and PR, youth and community work, finance roles, HR and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Because so many graduates get jobs in the civil service, a lot of graduates find themselves in London after graduating. Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in five politics graduates go on to take another course - usually a one-year Masters - after they finish their degrees.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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