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Ulster University

Music with Drama

UCAS Code: W3W4

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

To include grade B in Music. Applicants may satisfy the requirement for the final A level grade in the above grade profiles (C or B grade) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University. Alternatives to A level Music: a recognised Diploma (e.g. LRAM, ARCM, LRSM, ARCO, LTCL, LGSM, LLCM, RIAM) OR Grade 8 practical together with Grade 8 theory (preferably at distinction) is required. Further alternative qualifications to satisfy the Music entry requirement are stipulated within the other qualifications sections. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned by Music as part of our entry criteria. Although we expect candidates to be able to demonstrate a high level of performing ability, at this stage we are evaluating potential as much as achievement.

Please note that you must satisfy the requirement for Music grade B (or equivalent) for entry to this course. In addition: For Access qualifications validated by Ulster University or QUB the entry requirement is: An overall mark of 65%

GCSE/National 4/National 5

Please refer to the University’s general entrance requirements.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

25

To include 12 at higher level to include Music at HL5 Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to satisfy the Music subject requirements. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.

Irish Leaving Certificate - Higher Level

H3,H3,H3,H3,H4

To include grade H3 in Music . Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria. RIAM qualifications will also be considered in lieu of H3 Music

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

DMM

To include a minimum of 8 distinctions in level 3 units Acceptable Music awards = Performing Arts (Musical Theatre), Music and Music Technology (preferably with grade 5 Theory). Other Extended Diplomas will be considered if candidates can satisfy the A level Music grade B or equivalent subject requirement.

Scottish Advanced Higher

C,C,D

To include grade C in Music. Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University. Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to Music grade C at Advanced Higher. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.

Scottish Higher

B,B,C,C,C

To include grade B in Music. Applicants may satisfy the requirement for an element of the offer grade profiles (equating to the final A-level grade stated in the standard 3A level offer profile - grade C) by substituting a combination of alternative qualifications to the same standard as defined by the University. Please see other sections for alternative acceptable qualifications to Music grade B at Higher. Please note that all applicants for the degree course may be interviewed and auditioned as part of our entry criteria.

UCAS Tariff

112-117

We’ve calculated how many Ucas points you’ll need for this course.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2018

Subjects

Drama

Music

Study Music with Drama at Ulster University in the United Kingdom.

The undergraduate music degree programme at the School of Creative Arts, Ulster University is based around four core elements: Performance, Composition, Musicology and Music Technology. Classes take place over two 12-week semesters and each year a student will study 6 modules totalling 120 credits (normally 20 credits per module). Students studying Music in combination choose modules to the value of 40 credits (major) or 20 credits (Minor) in each semester.

Year 1 is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of musical styles, genres and disciplines enabling them to develop existing skills and interests as well as acquire a range of new ones. Musicology 1 and 2 both include strands in fundamental harmony while Performance Studies 1 and 2 include an Aural provision.

Note: BA students taking music as a major take Musicology and Performance Studies while those taking music as a minor may opt for either.

Year 2 allows students the opportunity to begin specialising by introducing a number of optional modules as well as level 2 modules in the four core disciplines. Musicology 3 and 4 – the only compulsory modules - both include strands in advanced harmony.

Note: BA students taking music as a major take Musicology and Performance Studies only (both 20 credits). All year 2 modules are worth 20 credits. BA music minor students may take Performance Studies instead of Musicology.

Year 3 enables students to focus their degree programme in one or more related areas of specialist interest with a broad range of advanced level modules. Placement presents students the opportunity to take part in an internship with a local music or arts organisation while the Project options allow students to pursue an independent course of research or practical work in a chosen field of musical study.

BA students taking music as a major have a choice of all available modules with the exception of modules requiring prerequisites (Composition and Music Technology).

Modules

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops. Assessment in Music at Ulster is by coursework alone. Assessment methods include essays, seminar papers, analytical assignments, performances, technical exercises, composition portfolios, oral presentations and reports.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,000
for the whole course
EU
£4,160
for the whole course
International
£13,240
for the whole course
Northern Ireland
£4,160
for the whole course
Scotland
£9,000
for the whole course
Wales
£9,000
for the whole course

The Uni


Course location:

Magee, Londonderry

Department:

Magee Campus

Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

88%
high
Drama
82%
med
Music

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Drama

Teaching and learning

98%
Staff make the subject interesting
98%
Staff are good at explaining things
95%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
93%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

84%
Library resources
79%
IT resources
89%
Course specific equipment and facilities
93%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

96%
UK students
4%
International students
33%
Male students
67%
Female students
44%
2:1 or above
7%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
C
335

Music

Teaching and learning

93%
Staff make the subject interesting
97%
Staff are good at explaining things
93%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
85%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

90%
Library resources
87%
IT resources
87%
Course specific equipment and facilities
78%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
39%
Male students
61%
Female students
86%
2:1 or above
10%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
B
B
351

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Drama

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
low
Average annual salary
88%
low
Employed or in further education
100%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

19%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
12%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
9%
Public services and other associate professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Drama is a very popular degree subject — in 2015, over 5,000 degrees were awarded to UK graduates. With so many graduates around, jobs in acting are very sought-after and often gained through personal contacts, or through your careers service so be prepared to practise your people skills and to make full use of your university facilities. But there are lots of roles in the arts for drama graduates, in direction, production, audio-visual, set and clothing design and PR. The skills taught by drama courses can be useful elsewhere — a lot of the economy can use people who can perform and present in front of others, and so drama graduates can be found in teaching, management, advertising, project and events organisation and community work. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' — having several part-time jobs or commissions at once — one in ten drama graduates last year had more than one job on the go at once after six months. And starting salaries are not the best - but nevertheless the large majority of drama graduates going into acting still felt that it was just the job for them regardless of pay.

Music

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,000
low
Average annual salary
85%
low
Employed or in further education
91%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

17%
Customer service occupations
17%
Childcare and related personal services
17%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Music is a popular degree subject and a little over 4,600 degrees were awarded to UK graduates in 2015. Most were working after six months — but postgraduate study (usually continuing with music) is quite common and a lot of graduates go into music teaching, often as freelance or travelling music teachers of particular instruments. Obviously, many music graduates get work as musicians as well, or work as sound recordists and in similar technical roles. Music is important in advertising and so a lot of graduates go into this industry, and management is also a popular job role for music graduates. There's also a niche for music graduates wanting to work in IT and computing, particularly with web applications. Because a lot of musician work is temporary or freelance, the most common way for new graduates to get jobs as musicians is through their own contacts, so learning how to make good use of networks and contacts might help in your career.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here