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University of Strathclyde

Journalism and Creative Writing and Politics and International Relations

UCAS Code: LP25
BA (Hons) 4 years full-time 2017
BA (Hons) 8 years part-time 2017
Ucas points guide

128

% applicants receiving offers

36%

Subjects
  • Politics
  • Journalism
Student score
84% MED
79% MED
% employed or in further study
96% MED
Not Available
Average graduate salary
£18k MED
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
ABB

A Levels: Year 1 entry: ABB-BBB (GCSE English Language B or Literature B, GCSE Maths C); Year 2 entry: not offered

Scottish Highers
AAAA-AAAAB

Highers 1st sitting: AAAA; 2nd sitting: AAAAB (Higher English, Maths/Lifeskill Maths National 5 C/Intermediate 2 C) Applicants with Highers Due to the high level of competition for places available, it is unlikely that Conditional Offers will be made to anyone attaining less than BBB at the first sitting of Highers. We recognise a wide range of Highers. However, social science subjects should make up the majority of an applicant?s profile. In addition to Higher English, at least one other Higher should come from the following list: ? Classical Studies ? Drama ? Economics ? French ? Gaelic ? Geography ? German ? History ? Italian ? Modern Studies ? Philosophy ? Politics/Psychology ? Religious Moral & Philosophical Studies ? Sociology ? Spanish

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

International Baccalaureate
36

Maths SL5

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 128 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

36%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£1,820

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Modules

Year 1: Introduces the key themes of politics and investigates the behaviour of both politicians and citizens through the study of institutions and concepts. You will also look at the bigger picture: the EU, the global dimension of politics, and conflict and cooperation between states. Years 2: The second year is organised around three core classes (modern political thought, international relations and global politics and contemporary British governance). Building on Year 1, these classes will equip you with the basic toolkit required to analyse political ideas and behaviour and provide firm foundations for more specialist study in Years 3 and 4. Year 3: Students wishing to proceed to politics in Year 4 are required to take research methods for political scientists but also have the opportunity to advance their study of politics by choosing from a wide range of options. The many optional classes such as American politics; European politics; Chinese politics; local politics; politics of European integration; Scottish politics; quantitative methods in social research, and war, terrorism and conflict reflect the research interests of academic staff, and cover a broad range of international and domestic political agendas. Year 4: A diverse selection of Honours classes covers Britain, the EU, and the international arena, and specific areas such as international security; green politics; feminism and politics; transforming democracies; political parties; analysing religion and politics; and political behaviour. Many of the classes focus on highly topical issues, for example, the class difference and democracy allows you to debate key questions about identity and multiculturalism. Year 1: Students study key concepts in creative writing such as narrative structure, and learn to apply these concepts in practical writing workshops. Students are introduced to core concepts in journalism studies, such as objectivity and news values, and explore the connection between journalism and creative writing. Year 2: Students take practical workshops in journalism and creative writing, and study the cultural and technological context of communication. Students explore the structure of media institutions and develop an awareness of writing techniques common to journalists and creative writers. Year 3: Students further develop your skills in such areas as script writing and features journalism. Students also study research techniques for writers and journalists. Year 4: Students continue to be able to combine journalism and creative writing study and prepare a substantial portfolio of work during the course of the year. Students also have the opportunity to take advanced Honours taught classes in journalism and creative writing, and a research-based dissertation or special project on a relevant topic.

University of Strathclyde

Students on campus,

The University of Strathclyde was established in 1796 as the 'place of useful learning' and today from the centre of the vibrant city of Glasgow it continues to provide its students with a relevant, high-quality education. The global application of research and knowledge exchange ensures Strathclyde takes its place as a leading international technological institution.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
21%
79%

Year 1

21%
79%

Year 2

18%
82%

Year 3

16%
84%

Year 4

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
40%
60%

Year 1

40%
60%

Year 2

30%
70%

Year 3

20%
80%

Year 4

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 91%
Student score 84% MED
Able to access IT resources

89%

Staff made the subject interesting

88%

Library resources are satisfactory

89%

Feedback on work has been helpful

59%

Feedback on work has been prompt

62%

Staff are good at explaining things

89%

Received sufficient advice and support

78%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
11% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
53% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
475 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
77% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
10% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £18k MED
Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

8%

Graduates who are sales supervisors

7%

Graduates who are customer service occupations

15%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Most politics or international relations graduates don't actually go into politics - although many do, as activists, fundraisers and researchers. Other popular industries include marketing and PR, management consultancy, youth and community work, the finance industry and academic research (you usually need a postgraduate degree to get into research). Politics is a very popular postgraduate subject, and so about one in six politics graduates go on to take another course to get a Masters after they finish their degrees.
Icon bubble

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 74%
Student score 79% MED
Able to access IT resources

91%

Staff made the subject interesting

91%

Library resources are satisfactory

87%

Feedback on work has been helpful

61%

Feedback on work has been prompt

52%

Staff are good at explaining things

91%

Received sufficient advice and support

78%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
18% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
63% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
468 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
88% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
10% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available
Graduates who are artistic, literary and media occupations

9%

Graduates who are other elementary services occupations

13%

Graduates who are media professionals

13%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Journalism roles are very sought after, and competition fierce. It's not impossible to get into roles with a first degree – quite a few do - but they can often be insecure or on a freelance basis, and a lot of jobs in journalism go to postgraduates. Unpaid work is not the norm for new journalists, but it’s rather more common than for other roles. The skills you can gain from a journalism degree can be useful in a range of industries, and so grads from these courses can be found in a wide range of jobs. London tends to dominate the jobs market for journalism graduates, but 2012 graduates found opportunities elsewhere, particularly in the South East and North West.
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