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University of Stirling

Animal Biology

UCAS Code: C300

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,B

To include Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

32

To include Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

Science related

Scottish Higher

A,A,B,B

AAAB over 2 sittings. To include Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics.

UCAS Tariff

120

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

75%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

4years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Animal behaviour

The Faculty of Natural Science is a friendly, vibrant, and dynamic place in which to learn and research. We have strong contacts with external conservation and environmental organisations who also contribute to the undergraduate experience. As a Biological and Environmental Sciences student, you will have the opportunity to participate in our well-established reciprocal exchange programme with the University of Guelph in Canada where you will take subjects equivalent to those at Stirling. In addition, there are exchange opportunities with a range of universities around the world. Animal Biology is the study of the enormous variety of animal life on Earth. It examines the evolutionary origins of the various animal groups, their fundamental structure, physiology, ecology, behaviour and conservation. The degree in Animal Biology allows students to train broadly in several aspects of this field, with a major emphasis on the biology of whole animals. We offer an exciting and integrated course of study including such themes as: • Animal behaviour• Animal physiology • Community ecology • Conservation biology • Host-parasite dynamics and other symbiotic interactions • Molecular and cell biology• Population and evolutionary genetics • Sexual selection and mating system evolution • Phylogenetics, taxonomy and speciation. Training is provided both on laboratory and field skills. As well as the beautiful campus in which the University is situated, we have a wide range of superb landscapes and habitats on our doorstep, and make the most of these throughout the degree. Final-year projects are a challenging yet valuable part of our degrees, and some have been so good they were published. These are supervised by a member of staff in the Faculty but may also be carried out in conjunction with an external organisation. Examples include: • Reducing stereotypical behaviour of captive animals – giraffe behaviour and enrichment techniques at Blair Drummond Safari Park • Sexually transmitted disease and ladybird immune competence • Effects of mating systems on female reproductive anatomy•        Invertebrate community responses to dam building by beavers • Buzz pollination and bee learning.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£1,820
per year
International
£14,820
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£1,820
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Stirling

Department:

Biological and Environmental Sciences

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What students say


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This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Agriculture, food and related studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

10%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

These stats refer to the prospects for graduates from both general animal studies courses and those for particular animals (such as equine science). Graduates don't generally get jobs as vets when they graduate; much the most common jobs tend to be roles caring for animals, such as veterinary nurses. Some of these jobs are not currently classified as professional level occupations, but in reality, you need a degree to get these jobs (and probably always have done), and graduates in them report that they got the jobs that they wanted. So the stats you see might not completely represent just how useful these degrees are for getting into animal care careers.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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