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University of South Wales

Aircraft Maintenance Engineering

UCAS Code: H402
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide

80-104

% applicants receiving offers

77%

Subjects
  • Aerospace engineering
Student score
59% LOW
% employed or in further study
81% LOW
Average graduate salary
£22.5k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
B,C,C-C,D,D

To include Mathematics or a numerate subject. The A Level entry criteria detailed is the qualification range within which the University will normally make offers. Most offers we make are normally at the top of the range, but we take all aspects of an application into consideration and applicants receive a personalised offer. Combinations with other listed qualifications are acceptable and others not listed may also be acceptable – please contact enquiries@southwales.ac.uk.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
DMM-MMP

In a relevant Maths, Science or Engineering subject. The BTEC entry criteria detailed is the qualification range within which the University will normally make offers. Most offers we make are normally at the top of the range, but we take all aspects of an application into consideration and applicants receive a personalised offer. Combinations with other listed qualifications are acceptable and others not listed may also be acceptable – please contact enquiries@southwales.ac.uk.

UCAS tariff points
80-104

The tariff entry criteria detailed is the qualification range within which the University will normally make offers. Most offers we make are normally at the top of the range, but we take all aspects of an application into consideration and applicants receive a personalised offer. Combinations of qualifications are acceptable and other qualifications not listed may also be acceptable.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 80-104 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

77%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Do you want to be an aircraft maintenance engineer? The University of South Wales’s BSc (Hons) Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree has been designed to meet the demands of the aerospace maintenance industry and will equip you with the depth and range of knowledge expected of a modern aerospace engineer. This Aircraft Maintenance Engineering course is recognised by European aviation law, as detailed by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), and gives you access to real aircraft experience. We are the only university in the UK that has integrated the industry-standard aircraft maintenance qualification ‘EASA Part-66’ with an Honours degree, delivered on a single campus. On completion of the required EASA training, you’ll be able to obtain a full EASA Part-66 Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Licence in just two years, which usually requires five years’ professional experience.* The University has approved Maintenance Training Organisation status. This means that our Aerospace Centre on campus is treated as a live aircraft environment, and upholds the same commercial aviation quality control you would expect in the industry worldwide. This approach not only meets EASA regulations, but will also help you make the transition from the classroom into employment. You’ll also have the option to undertake on the job training all over the world with any University-approved PART 145 Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) organisation.

Modules

The BSc Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree has the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Part 66 Aircraft maintenance licence fully embedded within the university modules. This allows you the opportunity to obtain this industry recognised qualification whilst you study for your degree. The University of South Wales is the only EASA part 147 UK University currently approved to deliver and award this qualification as part of its BSc Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree. Year One: Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree In year one, you’ll study the principles of engineering and the EASA B1 Basic Knowledge modular structure in greater depth. You’ll study the basic laws and theories of electrical and electronic fundamentals, aerodynamics, physics, analytical methods, and professional practice. Analytical Method for Engineers Aerospace Mechanics Electrical Fundamentals for Maintenance Engineers Electronic Fundamentals for Maintenance Engineers Professional Engineering Techniques Aerospace Materials and Hardware Year Two: Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree In year two, you’ll enhance your knowledge of aircraft materials, hardware, instrumentation systems and human factors, and hone practical and workshop skills. You’ll also study engineering management and issues surrounding the aircraft maintenance industry. Maintenance Practices for B1 licence Aircraft Instrumentation Systems Managing Human Factors Maintenance and Repair of Aircraft Propeller Systems Fundamentals of Business Engineering and Management Year Three: Aircraft Maintenance Engineering degree In year three, you’ll study aircraft structures and systems, gas turbine engines, project management strategies in an aircraft maintenance context, and aviation legislation, and complete a dissertation project. Aero-Structures, Aerodynamics and Systems Aircraft Turbine Propulsion Systems Aviation Legislation Individual Project

University of South Wales

Treforest campus

The University of South Wales, formed by the merger of the University of Glamorgan and the University of Wales, Newport, is one of the largest in the UK, offering more opportunities and better prospects for students. Students will benefit from the University’s growing reputation as a major university for jobs and employers.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 60%
Student score 59% LOW
Able to access IT resources

80%

Staff made the subject interesting

53%

Library resources are satisfactory

79%

Feedback on work has been helpful

58%

Feedback on work has been prompt

58%

Staff are good at explaining things

64%

Staff value students' opinions

52%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
34% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
7% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
19% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
320 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
76% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
6% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 81% LOW
Average graduate salary £22.5k LOW
Graduates who are public services and other associate professionals

5%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

5%

Graduates who are science, engineering and production technicians

42%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Just over a thousand UK graduates got a degree in aerospace engineering in 2015. There are a few dedicated employers, unevenly spread around the country, and so there's often competition for graduates looking for their first job - which leads to a relatively high (although improving) early unemployment rate, and a good grade is particularly important for graduates. Sponsorship and work experience can be key if you're after the most sought-after roles in the industry. Starting salaries are usually good and graduates commonly go into the aerospace (yes, this does include manufacture of equipment for satellites and space operations) and defence industries. Bear in mind that a lot of courses are four years long, and lead to an MEng qualification — this is necessary if you want to become a Chartered Engineer.
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