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University of Salford

English and Creative Writing

UCAS Code: QW38
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

104-120

% applicants receiving offers

91%

Subjects
  • English studies
  • Imaginative writing
Student score
80% LOW
59% LOW
% employed or in further study
93% MED
92% MED
Average graduate salary
£14.6k LOW
£13k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

Grade C or above in one of the following subjects: English Language, English Literature, English Language/Literature, Archaeology, Classical Civilization, Communication Studies, Critical Thinking, Drama, Film Studies, History, Sociology, Philosophy, Psychology, Religious Studies, Government and Politics or a Language. General Studies accepted.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

English Language, English Literature, English Language/Literature

BTEC Diploma
MMD

BTEC Certificate
DD

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MMD

International Baccalaureate
30

UCAS tariff points
104-120

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 104-120 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

91%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

Not available

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

3 good reasons to study English and Creative Writing at Salford: â?¢Learn from award winning professional writers who are experts in their field. â?¢Participate in masterclasses with writers, literary agents, publishers, commissioners, directors. â?¢Take part in competitions such as the BBC Future Talent Award. The written word enters every part of our lives, from novels to text messages. Worldwide, multi-billion pound industries depend upon new voices and fresh perspectives to form the books and films of tomorrow. Creative writers need to be skilled in the art of imaginative expression, but they also need to understand how literature works and to learn from what has been done before. This course teaches professional presentation, editing, research, genre specific techniques and the analytical tools needed for literary study while encouraging you to explore social and cultural issues. We have strong links with industry professionals and a history of student success in publishing their work.

Modules

Year 1: creative practice (observation, imagination, representation); narrative, fiction and the novel; introduction to drama; working the text; theory and practice; introduction to poetry. Year 2 creative writing modules (choose 3 from the following): writing fiction (contemporary practice; biography (tradition and innovation); playwriting; writing the novel for young people; writing for performance (writing for the BBC); introduction to childrenâ??s literature; creating visual text; creative non-fiction. Literature modules (choose 3 from the following): attitudes to English; Dickens; high romance of the late middle ages; introduction to childrenâ??s literature; literature, adaptation and the screen; womenâ??s writing between the wars; monstrous bodies; British writers and popular culture from the 1930s to 1980s; Chaucer and society in the late 14th century; utopias and dystopias; female gothic; reptiles of genius (satire and satirists in the 18th century). Year 3: final portfolio. 4 options from: playwriting; writing for performance (writing for the BBC); biography (tradition and innovation); British theatre post-1950; writing fiction (contemporary practice); new departures (reading and writing innovative poetry); change in contemporary English; dissertation; the language of names; representing the holocaust; Shakespeare and the play of thought; women behaving badly; writing/performing the city; reading the page; 21st century womenâ??s fiction; writing Ireland; the 20th century British working-class novel; green writing.

University of Salford

On campus

The University of Salford is hugely diverse and multicultural with a focus on practical experience and skills. We have fantastic connections with ITV and the BBC at the newly opened MediaCityUK complex, making for a highly engaging and creative student experience. The Students' Union has amazing opportunities in activities and volunteering and offers tonnes of support.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
18%
82%

Year 1

18%
82%

Year 2

24%
76%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
25%
70%
5%

Year 1

8%
85%
7%

Year 2

100%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 87%
Student score 80% LOW
Able to access IT resources

94%

Staff made the subject interesting

88%

Library resources are satisfactory

89%

Feedback on work has been helpful

74%

Feedback on work has been prompt

94%

Staff are good at explaining things

95%

Received sufficient advice and support

84%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
18% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
64% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
1% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
310 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
83% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
13% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 93% MED
Average graduate salary £14.6k LOW
Graduates who are customer service occupations

9%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

6%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

11%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
English is one of the most popular degree subjects and in 2012, more than 12,000 students graduated with English degrees. As good communication is so important to modern business, you can find English graduates in all parts of the economy, although obviously, you can't expect to get a job as a doctor or nuclear physicist. There isn't a lot of difference in terms of outcomes between taking English language or English literature, so choose the one that suits you and don't worry about whether one is more likely to get you the job you want than the other. About one in five English graduates went into further study last year, and apart from further degrees in English, graduates were also likely to go onto teaching, law or publishing. All in all it's a flexible option – some even changed career direction entirely and took postgraduate courses in subjects like nursing or maths.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 58%
Student score 59% LOW
Able to access IT resources

90%

Staff made the subject interesting

75%

Library resources are satisfactory

93%

Feedback on work has been helpful

66%

Feedback on work has been prompt

75%

Staff are good at explaining things

89%

Received sufficient advice and support

74%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
4% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
46% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
7% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
309 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
88% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
13% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 92% MED
Average graduate salary £13k LOW
Graduates who are artistic, literary and media occupations

8%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

14%

Graduates who are other elementary services occupations

12%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
It's been a difficult recession for this subject - which includes creative writing and scriptwriting courses - so unemployment rates are currently looking quite high overall, with salaries on the lower side. This should get better as the economy improves. Graduates often go into careers as authors and writers and are also found in other roles where the ability to write well is prized, such as journalism and advertising. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common in the arts, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' - having several part-time jobs or commissions at once.
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