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University of Salford

Pure & Applied Physics

UCAS Code: F310

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


104-112 UCAS Tariff Points. A Level grade C in Physics required. Pass A Level Science Practical. Must have studied Maths beyond GCSE level.

Pass with 104-112 UCAS points. QAA Approved in an Engineering or Science subject.

104-112 UCAS Tariff Points. Qualification not accepted on its own, must be completing a minimum of 2 A2s or equivalent.

112 UCAS Tariff Points, including Maths and Physics.

104-112 UCAS Tariff Points, including Maths and Physics.

104-112 UCAS Tariff Points. Qualification not accepted on its own, must be completing a minimum of 2 A2s or equivalent.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

Grade C or Grade 4 (or above) in Maths and English GCSE is required. Equivalent qualifications Key Skills Level 2, and Functional Skills Level 2, are also accepted.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

25

25 Points, including grade 5 in Higher Level Physics and grade 4 in Higher Level Maths.

112 UCAS Tariff Points, including Higher Level Physics.Must be studying Higher or Advanced Higher Maths ( this is not part of the offer).

112 UCAS Tariff Points. Only accepted with Higher Level Maths and Physics.

112 UCAS Tariff Points. Qualification not accepted on its own, must be completing a minimum of 2 A2s or equivalent.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

D*D*

Must be in an Engineering or Science subject and include Maths and Physics.

112 UCAS Tariff Points. Qualification not accepted on its own, must be completing a minimum of 2 A2s or equivalent.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

DMM

Must be in an Engineering or Science subject and include Maths and Physics.

112 UCAS Tariff Points. Qualification not accepted on its own, must be completing a minimum of 2 A2s or equivalent.

112 UCAS Tariff Points, including a minimum grade C in Advanced Higher Physics. Must be studying Maths at Higher or Advanced Higher (but this is not part of the offer)

112 UCAS Tariff Points, including grade C in Advanced Higher Physics. Must be studying Maths to Higher or Advanced Higher.

UCAS Tariff

104-112

104-112 UCAS Tariff Points, from a minimum of 2 A2 subjects or equivalent

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2018

Subject

Applied physics

**In brief:**
- This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics (IOP) and benefits from regular lectures from visiting industry professionals with associated case study problems

- Wide range of exciting specialisms and career options

- Ideal if you need extra support with your maths

- International students can apply

Physics underpins much in our everyday lives from the structure of the universe to your digital watch. Basic magnetism has led to life saving equipment such as CAT and MRI scanners and photonics research has led to CFDs, LEDs and barcode scanners. In fact, much of today’s technology is founded in physics.

Our physics courses combine a fundamental understanding of the laws of physics that govern the behaviour of all systems from the very small to the very large, with applications in modern technologies underpinned by these laws. The course is built around a core of compulsory modules giving a thorough grounding in physics. You will also take part in group projects that will allow you to develop your team working, problem solving, communication and presentation skills; all desirable within the industrial and research communities.

This course is specially designed for students from a non-standard mathematics background. You can choose to follow any of the physics degree courses that we offer within the first year of this degree. For example, you may opt to pursue the single-subject Physics degree. The only difference with Pure And Applied Physics is the additional mathematics help you will receive during your first year (and a more relaxed assessment regime - to let you catch up without worrying about end-of-semester mathematics exams).

Physics is widely considered to be a challenging subject and so here at Salford we place great emphasis on small group teaching so that you feel fully supported and able to ask questions, after all, all the best physicists have enquiring minds.

A unique part of our physics degree is our emphasis on employer engagement. We consulted professional physicists from industry when we designed this course to ensure that the content we are teaching you is robust and will prepare you for the world of work. Additionally, physicists working in industry also drop by to give guest seminars and set real life problems for you to work on. Due to the analytical and problem solving nature of physics, this degree opens doors to a wide range of careers. Previous graduates have commonly found employment in the following sectors: medical physics, defence, finance, research, education, engineering and nuclear. As a Salford graduate you will have no shortage of skills to take you into a successful, exciting career.

**A Foundation Year is available for this course.**

Modules

This course is built around a core of compulsory modules that will give a thorough grounding in physics. In addition there are option modules that allow you to add a specialism to your portfolio of knowledge and skills, such as astrophysics and PC interfacing. You will also take part in group projects that will allow you to develop your team working, problem solving, communication and presentation skills, all desirable within the industrial and research communities. You can choose to follow any of the physics degree courses within the first year of this degree. For example, you may opt to pursue the single-subject Physics degree. The only difference with Pure And Applied Physics is the additional mathematics help you will receive during your first year (and a more relaxed assessment regime - to let you catch up without worrying about end-of-semester mathematics exams).

The Uni


Course location:

University of Salford

Department:

School of Computing, Science and Engineering

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

89%
med
Applied physics

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Physics

Teaching and learning

86%
Staff make the subject interesting
96%
Staff are good at explaining things
96%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
86%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

86%
Library resources
93%
IT resources
96%
Course specific equipment and facilities
86%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

94%
UK students
6%
International students
82%
Male students
18%
Female students
60%
2:1 or above
14%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
C
291

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Physics

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,420
med
Average annual salary
84%
low
Employed or in further education
95%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

13%
Engineering professionals
13%
Science, engineering and production technicians
8%
Teaching and educational professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Although the subject has seen a bit of resurgence in recent years, the UK is still felt to be short of physics graduates, and in particular physicists training as teachers. If you want a career in physics research — in all sorts of areas, from atmospheric physics to lasers - you'll probably need to take a doctorate, and so have a think about where you would like to do that and how you might fund it (the government funds many physics doctorates, so you might not find it as hard as you think). With that in mind, it's not surprising that just over a fifth of physics graduates go on to take doctorates when they finish their degree, and well over a third of physicists take some kind of postgraduate study in total. Physics is highly regarded and surprisingly versatile, which is why physics graduates who decide not to stay in education are more likely to go into well-paid jobs in the finance industry than they are to go into science. The demand and versatility of physics degrees goes to explain why they're amongst the best-paid science graduates.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Physical sciences

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£20k

£20k

£21k

£21k

£21k

£21k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here