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University of Portsmouth

Petroleum Engineering

UCAS Code: HH85

Master of Engineering - MEng

Entry requirements


120-144 Tariff points to include a minimum of 3 A levels, with 40 points from Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects.

128 Tariff points from the Access to HE Diploma (Mathematics, Science or Technology based), with a minimum of 15 level 3 credits in Mathematics at Distinction.

Cambridge Pre-U score of 54 to include a minimum of 3 Principal Subjects, to include M2 in Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSE English and Combined Science/Physics at grade C, or equivalent/GCSE English and Combined Science/Physics at grade 4, or equivalent.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

27

27 points from the IB Diploma, to include 3 Higher Level subjects, with 6 points from a Higher Level in Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects at Higher Level.

Leaving Certificate - Higher Level (Ireland) (first awarded in 2017)

H2,H2,H3,H3,H3

To include Higher Level Mathematics at H3, plus two relevant subjects.

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications.

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DDM

Must be in a relevant subject.

120-144 Tariff points to include a minimum of 3 Advanced Highers, with 40 points from Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects.

UCAS Tariff

120-144

120-144 points to include a minimum of 3 A levels, or equivalent, with 40 points from Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects

67%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

4years

Full-time | 2019

Other options

5 years | Sandwich | 2019

Subject

Petroleum engineering

**Overview**

Petroleum engineers are involved in all stages of the exploration, drilling and extracting of oil from subsurface reservoirs, through to its transportation to surface separation and petroleum refineries.

If you're interested in this area, want to see the world and want to graduate with a postgraduate qualification, this MEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering integrated Master's degree course is ideal.

You'll get the practical and theoretical grounding that you need to succeed in the petroleum industry and associated fields. You'll study exploration, drilling, extraction, reservoirs, transportation and refinement. You'll spend time in labs and put what you've learnt to the test in the field.

Your skills and industry connections will make you a strong candidate for filling vacancies in the petroleum and engineering sector. You could work in oil and gas exploration, reservoir modelling, or product marketing, management and finance.

Accredited by

This course is accredited by the Energy Institute. This lets potential employers know that this course gives you the relevant skills and abilities you need to work in the industry when you graduate. This gives you an edge over students who didn’t do an accredited course when you’re applying for jobs.

After the course, you'll be eligible to apply for Incorporated Engineer (IEng) status and progress to Chartered Engineer status (CEng) with further study and experience.

**What you'll experience**

On this course you'll:

- Study the phases involved in finding, drilling and extracting oil

- Apply your skills in our geological and reservoir and drilling labs

- Use our computer-aided design (CAD) suite, rapid prototyping suite, energy systems lab, petroleum engineering lab, and metrology and 3D scanning microscopy facilities

- Take your learning out of the lab, with field visits to Stockbridge production facility and Kimmeridge Bay for geological work

- Take advantage of our status as an active chapter for the Society of Petroleum Engineers with regular industrial talks and an annual event celebrating Petroleum Week

- Become a student member of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) – we pay student membership fees for all of the students on this course

- Have the chance to expand your experience and make valuable contacts by completing your final-year project with support from the industry professionals and companies

- Study for a year longer than our BEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering course and graduate with a postgraduate-level Master's degree

**Careers and opportunities**

There's currently a shortage of qualified petroleum engineers in the oil and gas industry. When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry.

What can you do with a Petroleum Engineering degree?

Previous graduates have gone on to work in many petroleum-related fields, including:

- oil and gas exploration and production

- reservoir modelling

- drilling and refinery operations

- product marketing

- manufacturing

- management

- finance

What jobs can you do with a Petroleum Engineering degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

- petroleum engineer

- reservoir engineer

- drilling engineer

- gas engineer

You could also continue you studies at PhD level.

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

"When I saw there was an opening in my dream job, I knew it would be intensely competitive. I'd studied hard and prepared, but was my internship that really tipped the balance." Ola Ajayi, Petroleum Engineering Student

Modules

The first year's core units include: an introduction to petroleum engineering, the principles of petroleum engineering, chemistry for petroleum engineering, earth science, communication and mathematics. The core units for year two include: petroleum engineering numerical and computational methods, reservoir engineering, petroleum geosciences, drilling engineering and thermodynamics and reservoir fluid properties. In your third year you will study the following core units: an individual project, petroleum production engineering, petroleum reservoir simulation, formation evaluation and well logging and enhanced oil recovery and field development. This course has an optional placement year in industry which is offered between year three and four or between year four and five. The University has two specialised offices that will help you to find a placement. In your final year you will study the core units: energy management, economics and risk analysis, unconventional resources, well engineering and a multidisciplinary group project.

Assessment methods

Assessment is geared towards the subject matter in a way that encourages a deeper understanding and allows you to develop your skills. It includes examinations, assessed coursework, laboratory work and a dissertation that can often be linked with industry. We also assess your work formatively in seminars and open discussions, through an analysis of a case study, lab work, individual and group work and presentations and exams.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£15,900
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Portsmouth

Department:

Faculty of Technology

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

73%
med
Petroleum engineering

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Chemical, process and energy engineering

Teaching and learning

64%
Staff make the subject interesting
72%
Staff are good at explaining things
73%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
71%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

94%
Library resources
89%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
72%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

53%
UK students
47%
International students
85%
Male students
15%
Female students
61%
2:1 or above
3%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Chemical, process and energy engineering

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£25,000
med
Average annual salary
97%
high
Employed or in further education
86%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Science, engineering and production technicians
12%
Road transport drivers
8%
Business, research and administrative professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Want to make good money from the word go? This is the degree for you! The UK has had a shortage of chemical engineers for a while now so starting salaries are very good. In fact, across the UK, only doctors and dentists bettered the average starting salary for chemical engineering graduates, with an average starting salary of around £28,000. Key sectors for chemical engineers last year included the petrochemicals, food, nuclear, pharmaceuticals, materials and consultancy industries. Their skills set also means that the finance industry likes graduates from these degrees, so there are options if you don't fancy engineering as a career. Most graduates take a longer course that leads to an MEng — which is what you need to take if you want to be a Chartered Engineer. Chemical engineers are also more likely than other engineers to take doctorates and go into research roles, so if you want to take an engineering subject but fancy a research job, this might be a good subject to take.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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