We use cookies to allow us and selected partners to improve your experience and our advertising. By continuing to browse you consent to our use of cookies as per our policy which also explains how to change your preferences.

University of Manchester

Archaeology and History

UCAS Code: VV30

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

A,A,A

Grades AAA to include History. General Studies is welcomed but not included as part of the standard offer. A-level exams should be taken at the same sitting, after no more than two years of study. If you have studied an advanced curriculum, where the examinations are spread over three years, consideration for an offer will be at the discretion of the admissions tutor. We may also require further information, in order to make an informed judgment on your application.

Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3. Applicants must also have EITHER GCSEs in both English and Mathematics (at Grade B/6 or higher), OR must demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits each in English and Maths. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual basis. Please read the A-level entry requirements for this programme and then look at the relevant set of Access requirements: For programmes requiring A*AA and AAA: a minimum of 45 credits with a Distinction grade in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of these credits must be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels. For programmes requiring AAB: a minimum of 39 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 6 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels. For programmes requiring ABB: a minimum of 30 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 15 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels. If you are applying to a programme involving History: all Access applicants will be required to produce a piece of written work, for assessment by the Admissions Tutor. Once you have applied, the Admissions Administrator will contact you with a list of topics/questions. You will be asked to choose one and produce a piece (1500 words) on that subject, for submission by the deadline given by the Administrator. If you are applying to a programme involving one Language: you must also EITHER have GCSE Grade C/4 or higher in English Language or any Language, OR be able to demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits in English Language or any Language at Level 2. If you are applying to a programme involving two Languages : Applicants cannot begin both languages at beginners' level; they must already have an A-level or equivalent in one of the two Languages to be studied, as well as the Access qualification.

We welcome and recognise the value of the Advanced Welsh Baccalaureate and normally require two A Levels to be included within this. For applicants holding the newly reformed Advanced core (first teaching 2015), the grade required will normally be the same as the lowest A Level grade listed in the course entry requirements. We advise you to contact us if you require clarification on the acceptability of your specific portfolio of qualifications.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

English Language at minimum grade C or 4

Irish Leaving Certificate - Higher Level

H2,H2,H2,H2,H3

Including H2 in History Pre-2017: Grades A1A1A1B1 at Higher Level plus one other subject at Higher Level

OCR Cambridge Technical Diploma

DD

Plus an A Level at grade A in History

OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate

D*-D

Entry requirements are based on achievement of EITHER the full Technical Extended Certificate with grade D plus two A Levels at grades AA, OR full Tech Ext Cert Grade D* plus two A-levels at Grades AB. In both cases, A-level Grade A is required in History.

OCR Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma

D*D

Plus an A-level at min. Grade A in History plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

DD

Plus one A-level at Grade A in History.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

D

Plus two A-levels at Grades AA; one of these A-levels must be in History.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

DDD

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma: we require Distinction / Distinction / Distinction, plus one A-level at grade A in History.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma

D*,D

Plus an A-level at min. Grade A in History, plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

Scottish Higher

A,A,A,A,A,A-A,A,A,A,A,B


Grades AAAAA-AAAAB taken at one sitting: accepted only in conjunction with 3 Advanced Highers at Grades shown.

UCAS Tariff

144-198

We’ve calculated how many Ucas points you’ll need for this course.

75%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2018

Subjects

History

Archaeology

This joint honours degree explores the past through both The Written and The Wrought by examining lives, technologies, monuments and events through a close integration of Archaeology and History.
Whilst History specialises in the study of past societies through their written documents, many cultures are best approached not just through the texts that framed their lives, but the landscapes, architecture and objects they made or inhabited. Combine the best of both worlds: training in critical historical source analysis with practical archaeological methods, in our exciting new degree. You can select courses in Ancient, Medieval or Modern as well as Economic and Social History, or even specialise in the History of Science, Technology and Medicine. Other modules offer insights into gender history or the history of warfare and violence. Dedicated modules in historical archaeology bring these two subjects into close focus, with further archaeological options in prehistory to the industrial revolution, and historical modules in British, European, African or Asian history.

By drawing from the widest range of sources and methods, History and Archaeology embraces a rich tapestry of perspectives on the human past. You can take part in research training in both archival study and archaeological methods, developing skills that can lead to a variety of employment opportunities, including Public History, Conservation, Urban Planning, Field Archaeology, Heritage Management, and careers within museums and art galleries.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£18,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

Extra funding

The University is committed to supporting students from low-income households through our financial support packages detailed below.
Full-time UK students do not need to apply for Manchester’s bursaries separately but should ensure that they consent to share their financial details with the University when making an application to Student Finance England. http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/student-finance/2018/

The Uni


Course location:

University of Manchester

Department:

School of Arts, Languages and Cultures

TEF rating:

Study in Manchester

Explore the local area, what there is to do for fun, living costs and other university options here.

Explore Manchester
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

88%
med
Archaeology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

History

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

94%
UK students
6%
International students
48%
Male students
52%
Female students
89%
2:1 or above
5%
Drop out rate
407

Archaeology

Teaching and learning

97%
Staff make the subject interesting
100%
Staff are good at explaining things
86%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
92%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

89%
Library resources
84%
IT resources
92%
Course specific equipment and facilities
76%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

96%
UK students
4%
International students
37%
Male students
63%
Female students
78%
2:1 or above
7%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B
353

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

History

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

92%
low
Employed or in further education
84%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

13%
Other elementary services occupations
10%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
6%
Secretarial and related occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

History is a very popular subject (although numbers have fallen of late) — in 2015, over 10,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs, and consequently history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many — probably most — jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, human resources, marketing, PR and events management, as well as the more obvious roles in education, welfare and the arts. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, and politics were also popular postgraduate courses.

Archaeology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
med
Average annual salary
86%
low
Employed or in further education
87%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

12%
Other elementary services occupations
11%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
6%
Secretarial and related occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Want to do a job in the arts - with lots of the great outdoors? Try archaeology! There don't tend to be many archaeology undergraduates out there (just under 700 graduated in 2015) - but it's quite a popular subject at postgraduate level. In fact, over a quarter of archaeology graduates take some kind of further study when they graduate - usually more study of archaeology. When you look at the stats, be aware that junior jobs in archaeology are not always well paid at the start of your career, and that temporary contracts are not uncommon. Thankfully, though, unpaid work, whilst not completely gone, is less common than it used to be. The archaeology graduates of 2015 found jobs in archaeology, of course, but also management and heritage and environment work, as well as more conventional graduate jobs in marketing and the finance industry.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

Historical, philosophical and religious studies

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£18k

£18k

£23k

£23k

£25k

£25k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

Share this page

Expert tips for uni - straight to your inbox
Free to students, teachers and parents
Sign me up

This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here