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University of Kent

German and History

UCAS Code: RV21
BA (Hons) 4 years full-time, abroad 2017
Ucas points guide

120

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Subjects
  • German studies
  • History by period
Student score
76% MED
87% MED
% employed or in further study
96% MED
97% MED
Average graduate salary
£17k LOW
£19k HIGH
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
BBB

BBB in three A levels INCLUDING grade B in History; Classics- Ancient history; or Classics - Classical civilisation PLUS GCSE grade B or 5 in a modern European language OTHER THAN ENGLISH.

Scottish Highers
AABBB

Grades AABBB in five Higher subjects including History at A . If higher level a modern European language other than English is not taken Standard level 2 or intermediate grade B in an modern European language other than English is required History at grade A.

Scottish Advanced Highers
BBB

Grades BBB in three advanced highers including History at B required. If a modern European language other than English is not taken at advanced higher level standard grade 2 in a modern European language other than English is required. History at grade B.

BTEC Diploma
MMD

Applications considered individually. DMM plus history A level at B plus plus GCSE B in a modern European language other than English.

BTEC Certificate
DD

Applications considered individually. Plus A level B in history or clasical civilisation and GCSE B in a modern European language other than English.

BTEC Award
D

Distinction grade required. Additional qualifications equivalent to two A levels including A levlel history or classical civilsation at B also required. PLUS GCSE grade B in a modern European language OTHER THAN ENGLISH

BTEC Level 3 Diploma
D

Applications considered individually. Plus A level B in history or clasical civilisation and GCSE B in a modern European language other than English.

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma
D

distinction in BTEC plus Additional qualifications equivalent to two A levels including A level history or classical civilisation at B also required. PLUS GCSE grade B in a modern European language OTHER THAN ENGLISH

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MMD

DMM in BTEC plus A level history or clasical civilisation at B PLUS GCSE grade B in a modern European language OTHER THAN ENGLISH

International Baccalaureate
34

34 overall or 15 points at higher level INCLUDING higher English at A1/A2/B at 4/5/5 OR SL English at A1/A2/B at 5/5/6 PLUS HL 5 or SL 6 History PLUS HL English A1/A2/B at 4/5/5 or SL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 120 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

German and History enables you to learn the German language and about the cultures of the German-speaking world, while undertaking a detailed study of the past. German is one of Europe's most important languages for business and culture. Worldwide, it is the second-most widely used language on the internet (W3Techs 2014). Fluency in the German language, combined with knowledge of political and cultural developments in the German-speaking world, opens up career opportunities in many areas of Europe. The School of History has established itself as one of the leading History departments in the country, recognised for its research excellence, flexible programmes and quality teaching. You are taught by passionate academics, active researchers and recognised experts. You can tailor your modules to your own interests, and use your expanding knowledge of German culture and language to focus on European history with its dramatic conflicts and strong international relations.

Modules

Stage 1: German post A-level; images of Germany 1945-2000; varieties of German writing; making history; options including: Bede and the Northumbrian Renaissance; cinema and society 1914-60; medieval monasticism; revolutionary and Napoleonic France; the rise of the United States; war in history 1700-2001. Stages 2 and 3: German advanced; history dissertation; special subject in 1 of the following: the Dutch golden age; English politics 1629-1642: a highroad to civil war?; the Great war (1914-1918); independent documentary study; life in the Third Reich; popular uprisings and the making of civil war; racial eugenics, ethics and politics 1880-2000; the seven years war (1756-63); the Soviet Union and its collapse 1956-91; the world of illuminated manuscripts; options including: contemporary German literature; gender and identity in the age of Goethe; German dissertation; German fiction and the Third Reich; the German novella and short story; investigations into the German language; love and sex in modern Germany; modern German political drama; 3 German modernists: Mann, Kafka, Brecht; Britain and the American Revolution; Buffalo Bill to bison burgers: the American west in the 20th century; the Cold War 1941-1991; commercial empires: Britain and the Netherlands; the cultural history of the Great War; France in the age of absolutism; from Baldwin to Blair: British society and politics 1918-97; the history of medicine; the human uses of human beings: control and communication 1939 to the present; plague, community and conflict in late medieval England; society and culture in early modern Europe; the tools of empire 1760-1920; war, revolution and dictatorships in Europe 1870-1945. Year spent abroad between stages 2 and 3.

University of Kent

Students relax

Kent provides a wealth of European and international opportunities for study, work and travel, a stimulating and effective learning community that focuses on the individual and excellent research-led teaching. The main Canterbury campus is built on 300 acres of park land half-an-hour's walk from the city centre, surrounded by green open spaces, fields and woods.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 77%
Student score 76% MED
Able to access IT resources

77%

Staff made the subject interesting

81%

Library resources are satisfactory

65%

Feedback on work has been helpful

85%

Feedback on work has been prompt

77%

Staff are good at explaining things

96%

Received sufficient advice and support

68%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
18% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
64% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
0% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
341 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
89% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
8% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £17k LOW
Graduates who are public services and other associate professionals

9%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

19%

Graduates who are teaching and educational professionals

11%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
It's often said the UK doesn't produce enough modern language graduates, and graduates from German courses have a lot of options available to them when they complete their courses. The unemployment rates last year was lower than graduates in general. About one in six graduates got jobs in the EU – mostly as English teachers – which is much higher than for most subjects. The German economy is faring rather better than ours at the moment, so there may be other opportunities for ambitious graduates over there. But more graduates went to work in London, and those who want to stay at home to work find jobs anywhere where good communication skills are a must, particularly in education, translation, finance and advertising. But remember – whilst employers say they rate graduates who have more than one language, you need to have them as part of a whole package of good skills.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 94%
Student score 87% MED
Able to access IT resources

90%

Staff made the subject interesting

91%

Library resources are satisfactory

77%

Feedback on work has been helpful

73%

Feedback on work has been prompt

69%

Staff are good at explaining things

95%

Received sufficient advice and support

87%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
7% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
48% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
5% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
354 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
95% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
3% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 97% MED
Average graduate salary £19k HIGH
Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

10%

Graduates who are public services and other associate professionals

6%

Graduates who are business, research and administrative professionals

5%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
History is a very popular subject – in 2012, nearly 11,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs. Consequently, history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many – probably most – jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, management and sales and marketing. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year – only law saw more graduates continue on to study. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, politics and museum studies were also popular postgraduate courses.
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