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Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Anthropology
Student score
79% LOW
% employed or in further study
95% MED
Average graduate salary
£20k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

UCAS tariff points

from a combination of Level 3 qualifications including a Grade B at A Level or a Distinction in BTEC Subsidiary Diploma.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Crime exists in every world economy and the nature of crime is constantly changing. This means, however, that demand for understanding crime and for crime reduction and control is high, and continues to rise as societies attempt to address criminal behaviours. This course uses diverse and exciting teaching methods. You might hear from guest speakers who are experts in their field (e.g. retired police officers, drug outreach workers) and you'll participate in topical debates on why people commit crime, the most effective ways to stop crime, and how to prevent victimisation. The research and specialist knowledge of our teaching staff help to make the course engaging. They know more about crime and criminology than just the theory, and continue to advise the various agencies of the criminal justice system and voluntary sector. We'll support you to develop the personal, professional and academic skills needed to prepare you for a future career working with offenders, victims and organisations to reduce crime. Why study Criminology at Huddersfield? In your second year, you'll have the opportunity to benefit from a work placement. This will help to increase your future employability prospects and give you the chance to make useful contacts in industry. Our exchange programme could give you the opportunity to study abroad for a term in Europe, the USA or South East Asia. In the 2015 National Student Survey, sociology studies at Huddersfield received a 100% satisfaction score.


Year 1 Core modules: Exploring the Social Sciences; Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice; Human Rights in Contemporary Society; Myths and Realities of Crime. Year 2 Core modules: Explaining and Responding to Crime; Exploring Work and Careers; Doing Criminological Research. Option modules choose one from Pool A which may include: Working with offenders and Victims; The Police and Policing. Choose one from Pool B which may include: Gender Sexuality and Crime; Violent Crime; Organised and International Crime. Year 3 Core modules: Final Year Project for the Social Sciences; Contemporary and Comparative Criminology. Option modules choose one from Pool A which may include: Experiencing Punishment and the Penal System; Profiling and investigating Serious; Crime. Choose one from Pool B which may include: Offenders and Mental Disorder; Race; Ethnicity and Difference; Substance Misuse and Crime; Terrorism and Conflict Resolution.

University of Huddersfield

The campus at sunset

The University of Huddersfield was named Times Higher Education University of the Year in 2013, an award supported by outstanding support for students at all levels. The university is in the top ten in the UK for graduate employability and teaching excellence and the number one mainstream university in England for assessment and feedback. Combine this with our record for supporting work placements and student enterprise and you will find there is a lot more to Huddersfield than meets the eye.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 88%
Student score 79% LOW
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
4% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
73% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
322 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
53% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
Not Available
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 95% MED
Average graduate salary £20k MED
Graduates who are protective service occupations


Graduates who are welfare professionals


Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
This is a pretty flexible degree and a good one if you want to keep your options open. Just over 1,250 graduates completed anthropology degrees last year, and they were well spread out across a whole range of jobs — many industries have jobs that can be done by anthropology graduates and unlike a lot of degrees, there aren't many jobs we can point to and say ‘graduates from this degree do that job’. Management, marketing, housing and recruitment jobs are the most popular, though, and many graduates go into the education or social care sectors. Graduates are also rather more likely than average to work in London, or to go overseas to work. This is quite a popular subject at postgraduate level, and if you want to go into research, you'll need to think about postgrad study - and it's one of the few where numbers are on the up at the moment.
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