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BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

112

% applicants receiving offers

96%

Subjects
  • Anthropology
Student score
Not Available
% employed or in further study
Not Available
Average graduate salary
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

BBC

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
MMD

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MMD

International Baccalaureate
30

UCAS tariff points
112

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

96%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Crime exists in every world economy and the nature of crime is constantly changing. This means, however, that demand for understanding crime and for crime reduction and control is high, and continues to rise as societies attempt to address criminal behaviours. This course uses diverse and exciting teaching methods. You might hear from guest speakers who are experts in their field (e.g. retired police officers, drug outreach workers) and you'll participate in topical debates on why people commit crime, the most effective ways to stop crime, and how to prevent victimisation. The research and specialist knowledge of our teaching staff help to make the course engaging. They know more about crime and criminology than just the theory, and continue to advise the various agencies of the criminal justice system and voluntary sector. We'll support you to develop the personal, professional and academic skills needed to prepare you for a future career working with offenders, victims and organisations to reduce crime. Why study Criminology at Huddersfield? In your second year, you'll have the opportunity to benefit from a work placement. This will help to increase your future employability prospects and give you the chance to make useful contacts in industry. Our exchange programme could give you the opportunity to study abroad for a term in Europe, the USA or South East Asia. In the 2015 National Student Survey, sociology studies at Huddersfield received a 100% satisfaction score.

Modules

Year 1 Core modules: Academic Study Skills for Social Scientists: This module helps to develop your academic study skills and gives you an introduction to research methods in the social sciences. You'll explore ways to assess your learning needs, set learning goals and develop action plans. You'll also be introduced to the philosophies, methods and ethics of social research processes. Assessment on this module involves producing two pieces of coursework. A portfolio, demonstrating your understanding of academic skills including referencing, critical writing and reflection (worth 50% of module marks) and a written assignment (worth 50 per cent of module marks) where you'll describe and evaluate different research approaches and consider ethical issues in research. Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice: You'll be introduced to the key areas of study within crime, criminology and criminal justice. The module is assessed through three pieces of coursework. Firstly your understanding of crime, antisocial behaviour and criminal law will be assessed in a workbook (worth 25 per cent of module marks). Secondly you'll consider the functions and decision-making involved in the criminal justice system through a group poster presentation (worth 35 per cent of module marks). You'll also explore some of the key theories that have been proposed to explain why people commit crime in a seen exam (worth 40 per cent of module marks). Human Rights in Contemporary Society: You'll examine the history of human rights and consider the debates which exist in contemporary society. You'll be introduced to a number of issues including genocide, the death penalty, freedom of expression, immigration, the rights of women and children, assisted suicide and abortion. Key documents including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, European Convention on Human Rights and the Human Rights Act will also be discussed. You'll be assessed through coursework involving the analysis of six contemporary media articles in relation to issues of human rights (worth 100 per cent of module marks). Myths and Realities of Crime: You'll explore both the myths and realities of crime through written coursework (worth 100 per cent of module marks). The realities of crime are examined by considering how we measure the amount and types of crime being committed in England and Wales, who by, against whom and where. The myths of crime are studied through media (mis)representations of crime, offending and victimisation, considering the factors that shape crime reporting. The effects of these representations on the public will be considered by exploring research undertaken linking media reporting of crime to fear of crime, violent behaviour or aggression. Year 2 Core modules: Explaining and Responding to Crime: This module explores the explanations for crime and disorder, which you will relate to the ways that society responds to crime. These issues will be set in a social, political, theoretical and historical context. You will be assessed through 2 pieces of coursework, where you will complete a theory-based essay (worth 50 per cent of module marks) and compile a crime prevention strategy document (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Professional Practice and Research: You'll have the opportunity to plan and complete a practical work based experience. This will give you the chance to apply your theoretical knowledge to a professional setting, helping to develop your employability skills in preparation for your future career. You'll reflect upon the skills you have gained by producing of a reflective portfolio (worth 50 per cent of module marks). You'll also build upon your foundation knowledge of research methods and processes through a written assignment (worth 25 per cent of module marks), and gain experience of designing research and analysing related data through a research report (worth 25 per cent of module marks). Option modules choose one from a list which may include: Working with offenders and Victims: You will be introduced to critical perspectives of the methods and processes of work undertaken with offenders and victims within the criminal justice process. This will include an exploration of factors that may influence criminal offending and how these may be addressed with strategies to reduce and manage offending through coursework involving an in-class exercise (worth 50 per cent of module marks). You will also explore patterns of victimisation and repeat victimisation and strategies to address the needs of victims through written coursework (worth 50 per cent of module marks). This module will enable you to gain a critical understanding of the methods and processes of work undertaken with offenders and victims within the criminal justice process. This will include an exploration of factors that may influence criminal offending, and how these may be addressed in strategies to reduce and manage offending. You will also explore patterns of victimisation and repeat victimisation and strategies to address the needs of victims. You will be introduced to the study of victimology and how this field of Criminology has informed criminal justice policy and practice. The Police and Policing: You'll focus on the evolution of the police and policing functions in England and Wales, through written coursework, producing a timeline of key policing events (worth 25 per cent of modules marks). You will also compare policing in England and Wales with that of another country for example France, Russia and the USA, through written coursework (worth 75 per cent of module marks). Choose one from a list which may include: Gender Sexuality and Crime: You'll look at gender and sexuality and explore the significance of these categories in relation to crime, deviance and regulation. You'll explore a range of topics from children and crime, deviant women, men, masculinity and crime, and sexual/domestic violence. You'll also watch videos, documentaries and news broadcasts and analyse how these construct and represent gender and crime. The module is assessed through coursework involving an essay (worth 50% of module marks) and a seen exam (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Violent Crime: You'll explore the nature, variety and extent of violent crime and its prevention (for example terrorism, homicide, work-placed bullying, and stalking). You'll demonstrate your knowledge of theoretical explanations for violent crime and violence prevention methods through an unseen exam. Organised and International Crime: You will explore two aspects of organised crime. Firstly, you will study white-collar, financial crimes and the damaging impact that they can have on the economy of a country. Secondly you will examine how organised crime can drive people trafficking and trading of drugs and illegal arms, which enables â??rogueâ?? states to wage war on their own people. Finally you will explore how both kinds of crime relate to your own life. You will be assessed through a 2 hour unseen examination (worth 100 per cent of module marks). Year 3 Core modules: Final Year Project for the Social Sciences: You'll research a topic of your choice in depth, giving you the opportunity to develop your own research interests. Drawing on the area you have chosen to study, you'll engage with issues of project design and research methods. You'll be assessed through two pieces of coursework. Firstly through an oral presentation (worth 10 per cent of module marks) you'll discuss your project proposal. You'll then produce a dissertation (worth 90 per cent of module marks) about your research topic. Youâ??ll receive individual support from a dedicated staff member in supervision sessions, which will include providing feedback on up to 25 per cent of the final draft of the project (if submitted by an agreed date). Contemporary and Comparative Criminology: You'll be encouraged to critically consider contemporary and newly emerging issues and debates within criminology, through coursework involving a written case study of your choice (worth 100 per cent of module marks). You'll be introduced to the field of comparative criminology by exploring key criminological problems in England and Wales within the context of historical and international comparisons of crime patterns and trends, criminal justice policy, practice and theoretical developments. Example topics include prostitution, the illegal trade in endangered species, management of sex offenders, genocide and people trafficking. Option modules: Choose one from a list which may include: Experiencing Punishment and the Penal System: You'll be encouraged to critically examine the adult penal or 'punishment' system in England and Wales. You'll focus on how people working and caught in the system experience this, exploring areas such as prison subcultures, effects of imprisonment on family members and how prisoners cope with life inside. Through coursework involving an oral presentation (worth 50 per cent of module marks) you'll consider the diversity of experiences alongside a theoretical consideration of these experiences in the context of the formal structures and role of the system, assessed through coursework involving a written assignment (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Profiling and investigating Serious Crime: You'll be introduced to the field of serious crime (for example murder, serial murder and sex offences), offender profiling and the associated police investigation process in the UK. You'll demonstrate your knowledge of offender profiling by producing written coursework (worth 50 per cent of module marks) and the criminal investigation process through an unseen exam (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Choose one from a list which may include: Men; Masculinity and Crime: This module questions how male identity and masculinity may influence men to engage in greater and more inappropriate risk-taking and harmful behaviour than women. You'll consider masculinity as a potential driver of, for example, town-centre disorder, domestic violence, sexual offences, child abuse and suicidal terrorism. You'll also consider the implications of policing agencies being run mostly by men. This module is assessed through written coursework (worth 100 per cent of module marks). Offenders and Mental Disorder: In this module you'll be supported to develop your knowledge of the relationship between mental illness and criminal activity. You'll explore a range of mental illnesses and disorders as a cause of offending through a written coursework assignment (worth 50 per cent of module marks), and will have the opportunity to consider the links between theory and practice by completing a written coursework assignment on the appropriateness of treatment for offenders within the forensic mental health system (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Race; Ethnicity and Difference: On this module you'll consider contemporary British society in relation to issues of race, ethnicity and difference. You'll explore the extent to which race and ethnicity continue to shape contemporary society, in relation to education, health, employment, government policies and popular culture such as films and music. The module is assessed through two pieces of written coursework (each worth 50 per cent of module marks) on topics such as multiculturalism, race and sport, and the representation of racialised groups. Substance Misuse and Crime: In this module you'll be supported to develop your knowledge of the relationship between substance misuse and criminal activity. You'll be encouraged to consider the nature of addiction and substance taking as a cause of crime and examine a range of illegal substances through a written coursework assignment (worth 50 per cent of module marks) and will have the opportunity to consider the links between theory and practice by completing coursework in the form of a case-study based written assignment exploring legislation, policy and treatment options for an individual with a drug or alcohol dependency (worth 50 per cent of module marks). Terrorism and Conflict Resolution: Through this module you'll be supported to develop a critical understanding of the ways in which terrorism has been defined. You'll demonstrate this understanding through coursework, involving a written assignment (worth 60 per cent of module marks). Debates about legitimacy and political violence will be applied to a number of case studies, allowing you to explore the motivations of different groups who have used violence as a political strategy. This will be assessed through an exam (worth 40 per cent of module marks). Choose one additional module from either of the lists above.

University of Huddersfield

The campus at sunset

The University of Huddersfield was named Times Higher Education University of the Year in 2013, an award supported by outstanding support for students at all levels. The university is in the top ten in the UK for graduate employability and teaching excellence and the number one mainstream university in England for assessment and feedback. Combine this with our record for supporting work placements and student enterprise and you will find there is a lot more to Huddersfield than meets the eye.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
17%
83%

Year 1

18%
79%
3%

Year 2

16%
84%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
13%
75%
12%

Year 1

17%
75%
8%

Year 2

7%
90%
3%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
4% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
73% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
322 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
53% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
Not Available
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Fewer than 800 graduates completed anthropology degrees last year, and they were well spread out across a whole range of jobs – many industries have jobs that can be done by anthropology graduates and unlike a lot of degrees, there aren't many jobs we can point to and say ‘graduates from this degree do that job’. Management and marketing jobs are the most popular, though, and many graduates go into the education or social care sectors. Graduates are also rather more likely than average to work in London, or to go overseas to work. This is quite a popular subject at postgraduate level, and if you want to go into research, you'll need to think about postgrad study.
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