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University of Huddersfield

Costume with Textiles

UCAS Code: W4W2
BA (Hons) 4 years full-time, sandwich 2017
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

120

% applicants receiving offers

69%

Subjects
  • Drama
  • Design studies
Student score
87% HIGH
80% MED
% employed or in further study
100% HIGH
94% MED
Average graduate salary
£15.3k MED
£17k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

BBB or equivalent UCAS tariff points.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
MMD

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MMD

International Baccalaureate
31

UCAS tariff points
120

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 120 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

69%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

This course aims to offer a fresh and original approach to costume design through combining textiles and construction. You'll have the opportunity to learn how to analyse text, music and character and develop individual concepts for costume designs. Through exploration of a variety of techniques and processes you'll be supported in developing a range of key skills in research, critical reflection, design development, illustration, textile experimentation and costume construction. You'll be encouraged to take risks, to question and challenge your work and to develop an individual identity.

Modules

Year 1 Core modules: Introduction to Costume Construction: This module helps you to develop the knowledge needed to transfer a design concept into a three-dimensional costume. Youâ??ll be introduced to appropriate sewing methods for toile and costume construction, and the basic principles of flat pattern cutting, basic block manipulation and experimentation with cut. You will be asked to produce a comprehensive file of patterns and samples. (100 per cent construction file). Introduction to Textiles for Costume: In this module a series of practical workshops will introduce you to basic skills in a variety of drawing and textile processes and techniques, developing your ability to creatively explore textiles for costume. Colour palette and knowledge of fabric types and quality will also be explored and form a crucial part of the process. (100 per cent portfolio). Fashion and Costume: History and Contemporary Context: This module provides an introduction to key historical, cultural, political, social and economic contexts which affect our readings of fashion and costume practices. It will include a review of stylistic change and how it has been influenced by key macro trends, cultural movements and also socio-political and technological change. The research and performance contexts of fashion and costume practices will also be considered. (40 per cent group presentation/60 per cent individual assignment). Introduction to Costume Design and Illustration: This module introduces script analysis, character interpretation and visual methods of design for costume, selected from a range of performance areas. Weâ??ll help you to understand methods of script analysis and character analysis, in order to inform the design development process. Weâ??ll also introduce you to illustration techniques which explore a variety of media and methods. (100 per cent portfolio). Year 2 Core modules: Textiles for Costume: This module aims to develop your textile specialism by experimentation with techniques and processes. You will be encouraged to express your creativity through visual research and design development, characterisation and textile sampling. You will be involved in personal assignments which develop an individual approach to creating textiles. (100 per cent portfolio). Costume Design and Context: This module aims to develop your ability to independently research in order to express individual interpretation for script analysis, characterisation and design development. Through a series of lectures and workshops, youâ??ll have the chance to appraise and evaluate the results of the research and design development work, to clearly identify and establish your specialism within a design context. (100 per cent Portfolio). Costume Construction: This module introduces more advanced pattern cutting and costume construction methods. This will help you develop skills in prop-making and introduce you to techniques used for the ageing and breaking down of costumes for a variety of performance areas. Through your interpretation of historical and contemporary silhouettes, you will be asked to produce toiles and finished costumes as well as any appropriate accessories. (100 per cent portfolio). Year 3 optional placement year School of Art and Design Placement: You will normally spend a total of 48 weeks between the end of year two and the beginning of your final year in a managed work experience. You will be encouraged to obtain a placement activity relevant to your area of specialism, however a wide range of placements will be regarded as suitable. The placement will be monitored and you will be assessed on completion. (100 per cent). Final Year Core Costume : Research and Development: This module aims to establish and inform your major project by identifying a theme/subject/issue relevant to your practice. The module will re-emphasise the importance of in-depth research, within which you will be encouraged to demonstrate originality, pro-activity and innovation. Youâ??ll have the chance to define the context and parameters of this module yourself through negotiation and ongoing dialogue with your tutors. (100 per cent research portfolio). Costume: Technical: This module enables you to complement your major project by undertaking an in-depth market/technical analysis and evaluation of your finalised design. You will be able to extend and apply your knowledge of manufacturing, production and specification design to your design practice: products, environments, buildings, materials etc. You will be asked to demonstrate critical analysis and evaluation of market, technical, manufacturing and economic aspects relating to your design solutions. (20 per cent oral presentation/80 per cent final piece of assessment). Costume : Major Project: You will be supported in building upon and testing research developed in THD1363 Research and Development. You will be encouraged to channel your creative and intellectual skills, either as an individual, or as part of a collaboration or interdisciplinary team, to create innovative original or highly professional proposition(s) appropriate to your discipline through, for example, sketchbooks, design sheets, design outputs. You will be asked to realise the potential for your major project based on your intentions and create a coherent group of statement pieces. (100 per cent design project).

University of Huddersfield

The campus at sunset

The University of Huddersfield was named Times Higher Education University of the Year in 2013, an award supported by outstanding support for students at all levels. The university is in the top ten in the UK for graduate employability and teaching excellence and the number one mainstream university in England for assessment and feedback. Combine this with our record for supporting work placements and student enterprise and you will find there is a lot more to Huddersfield than meets the eye.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
24%
76%

Year 1

22%
78%

Year 2

35%
65%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
100%

Year 1

100%

Year 2

100%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 93%
Student score 87% HIGH
Able to access IT resources

100%

Staff made the subject interesting

97%

Library resources are satisfactory

96%

Feedback on work has been helpful

80%

Feedback on work has been prompt

86%

Staff are good at explaining things

97%

Received sufficient advice and support

90%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
1% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
64% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
1% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
331 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
94% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
11% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 100% HIGH
Average graduate salary £15.3k MED
Graduates who are other elementary services occupations

7%

Graduates who are teaching and educational professionals

6%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

10%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Drama is a very popular degree subject – in 2012, over 5,800 degrees were awarded to UK graduates. With so many graduates around, jobs in acting are very sought-after and often gained through personal contacts, so be prepared to practise your people skills. But there are lots of roles in the arts for drama graduates, in direction, production, design, journalism and PR. The skills taught by drama courses can be useful elsewhere – a lot of the economy can use people who can perform and present in front of others, and so drama graduates can be found in teaching, management, advertising, project and events organisation and community work. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' – having several part-time jobs or commissions at once – over one in ten drama graduates last year had more than one job on the go at once after six months.
Icon bubble

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 86%
Student score 80% MED
Able to access IT resources

91%

Staff made the subject interesting

85%

Library resources are satisfactory

89%

Feedback on work has been helpful

77%

Feedback on work has been prompt

84%

Staff are good at explaining things

87%

Received sufficient advice and support

82%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
6% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
73% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
3% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
340 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
80% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
12% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 94% MED
Average graduate salary £17k MED
Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

8%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

7%

Graduates who are design occupations

28%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The UK has a proud reputation as a centre of design excellence, and last year, design was behind only nursing in the number of graduates from UK universities with nearly 13,700. Not all areas of design have been affected equally by the recession, so bear this in mind when you look at the stats. At the moment, things are looking a little better for fashion and textile designers and not as good for interior or multimedia designers – but that may change by the time you graduate. In general, design graduates are more likely than most to start their career in London. This also varies by subject – fashion designers often find jobs in the North West. Some employers in the field, particularly in London, are a little prone to asking graduates to work for free, so while it’s not the norm – one in nine design graduates from 2012 starting design jobs in London were working unpaid – it does go on.
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