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University of Exeter

Archaeology with Forensic Science

UCAS Code: F490
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Forensic & archaeological sciences
Student score
Not Available
% employed or in further study
Not Available
Average graduate salary
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

Scottish Highers

Scottish Advanced Highers

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

International Baccalaureate

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 120-153 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

The BSc in Archaeology with Forensic Science combines the study of two exciting scientifically-related disciplines and allows you to develop skills in uncovering the detail of past events, particularly death and burial. This unique programme will provide you with a sound knowledge of archaeological periods and the techniques of forensic archaeology and anthropology, including the study of human remains. You will also gain an insight into the forensic techniques used in criminal cases. You will hear from a series of experts, including scenes of crime and police officers, lawyers and ballistics specialists to understand how modern forensics are used in the investigation and detection of crime. You do not need an A level in Archaeology as our introductory modules will quickly bring you up to speed with the key topics and principles underpinning archaeological research. In your first year, you will acquire general archaeological knowledge, as well as an introduction to a selection of key scientific skills that are useful to both archaeological and forensic sciences. In addition to modules in your specialism, you will also be able to choose options from a wide range of archaeology modules or from another discipline such as criminal law or criminology. In your second year, you will be introduced to the basic principles of the study of human remains to establish personal identity (with emphasis on the characterisation of skeletal shape and size and application of demographic reference standards for age and sex determination and population affinity). You will be introduced to pathological and anatomical variation applied to establish human identity, and its relevance within the discipline of biological anthropology. Your studies will also cover aspects of forensic science, such as ballistics, DNA fingerprinting and drugs analysis. This includes sessions carried out by visiting experts involved in the criminal justice system. During your third year, you will study the complexity and variability of funerary treatment and rituals through a series of lectures based upon a chronological development in Europe and the Near East, from the Middle Palaeolithic to the Medieval period. You will also examine the relationship between the funerary domain and the once-living society that created it. You will be offered a choice of options, which may include a Professional Placement or a module from another discipline. In addition, you can choose your dissertation topic from either archaeology or forensic archaeology. You will have the opportunity to take part in field work in the UK and further afield. Field work opportunities for undergraduate students have recently included surveys and excavations of an Iron Age/Roman 3 settlement in Devon, prehistoric settlements in Kazakhstan and Romania, a prehistoric Indian village in South Dakota, and the environmental archaeology of the Amazon basin in Brazil. Programme variations


University of Exeter

Streatham Campus

Exeter is a top university, combining world leading research with some of the highest levels of student satisfaction in the country. We've really invested in buildings and facilities over the last few years, with the showpiece building, The Forum, being opened by the Queen. JK Rowling studied in Exeter and based many elements of Harry Potter on our traditions and buildings...

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.


Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The statistics here primarily reflect the prospects for forensic science graduates - they make up over three quarters of the group. While there are not a lot of jobs available in forensics itself just at the moment, reflected in the overall unemployment rates for forensic science graduates, there are still jobs for graduates from these subjects as they learn useful analysis techniques that some employers can find in short supply. Last year's graduates went into analysis work in labs, technician roles and general research, and for those looking a little wider, business roles and management also employed forensics graduates. Some graduates join the police with this degree and that can be a good source of sponsorship and work experience.
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