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University of Buckingham

International Studies (3 year programme)

UCAS Code: L901

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,C,C

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

30

Scottish Advanced Higher

B,B,C

Scottish Higher

B,B,B,C

UCAS Tariff

102-136

We’ve calculated how many Ucas points you’ll need for this course.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Social sciences (non-specific)

The University of Buckingham is:o Home of the 2-year degree less cost and more focuso Top for Teaching Quality (The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide)o Top for Student Satisfaction (National Student Survey and Complete University Guide)o Small group teaching focused student:staff ratio of 11:1 o Flexible start your course in September or JanuaryAn important feature of the modern world which is widely recognised and commented upon by business people, journalists, politicians, diplomats, teachers and virtually anyone with the alertness to look about them, is its increasing inter-dependence and internationalisation. Your ability to read this message on the World Wide Web is itself a manifestation of the power of ideas to transcend national boundaries with great rapidity and at low cost. Technology has proved to be an agent which encourages co-operation across national boundaries. Technological developments in transport, telecommunications and computing have encouraged economic changes such as the decline in barriers to trade, the internationalisation of financial markets, the rise of global companies, and a massive increase in the volume of international trade in goods and services. These trends have been accompanied by political developments such as the rise of regional trading groupings of countries, international efforts to agree about common legal and technical rules to govern business dealings, arguments about tax competition between countries, as well as increasing concern about the environmental consequences associated with world economic development. Enormous social tensions arise as these international forces come into conflict with long established ways of doing things in every country. Political and social systems are in a continuous process of adjustment to an increasingly open world.The International Studies programme at Buckingham gives you an opportunity to learn about these fundamental problems. With students coming to Buckingham from over 80 countries, it is an ideal environment to learn about matters of international concern and to discuss them with people from differing cultural backgrounds. The programme is inter-disciplinary and covers economic, political, legal, historical and cultural dimensions. Graduates from the International Studies programme will have acquired a knowledge of economics sufficient to analyse and understand the global marketplace; a familiarity with political systems in a range of different countries; and a good historical understanding of how the international framework has evolved over time.

Modules

Africa and the Dominions,
Comparative Politics: Iran and Russia,
Comparative Revolutions: Britain, France and Russia,
Competing Approaches to Political Analysis,
European Industrial Revolutions,
Freedom,
Government and Politics of China,
Government and Politics of the UK and the US,
History of Economic Thought,
International Law,
International Relations: Theories and Concepts,
Issues in Developing Economies and the MENA Region,
Liberalism and Nationalism,
Political Communication,
Political Psychology,
Politics of Latin America,
Principles of Macroeconomics,
Principles of Microeconomics,
Regulation and Privatisation,
Rivalries and Alliances 1879-1914,
The Economics of Europe,
The European Union in the International System,
The New International Society 1975-2005,
Theories of Empire and India,
US Foreign Policy in Post Cold War Era.

Assessment methods

Teaching is carried out through a combination of lectures supported by seminars and tutorials. A key feature of the Buckingham teaching method is the use of small tutorial groups which provide the most effective means of ensuring that the students benefit from the academic expertise at their disposal. It is also the philosophy of Buckingham’s faculty to be available to students outside the scheduled tutorial times and to encourage good working relationships between staff and students.

A range of activities is pursued within the tutorial groups depending upon the module. Some modules emphasise problem solving as a means of reinforcing and cementing the important ideas – for example the module in Microeconomic Theory. Occasionally we use game playing to encourage discussion and understanding – for example when competing groups of students try to control a computer model of the economy in Principles of Macroeconomics. Other modules place greater emphasis on writing short and accurate technical pieces (Welfare Economics) or longer more discursive papers.The assessment of individual modules within each course varies according to the subject. Assessment is usually by examination, assessed coursework, or a combination of the two.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£25,200
for the whole course
England
£25,200
for the whole course
EU
£25,200
for the whole course
International
£34,800
for the whole course
Northern Ireland
£25,200
for the whole course
Scotland
£25,200
for the whole course
Wales
£25,200
for the whole course

Extra funding

The University would like to encourage students – both undergraduates and postgraduates – to come to Buckingham regardless of their financial circumstances. The bursaries and scholarships we offer are awarded on merit and/or on financial need. You may only accept one University award.

All awards are subject to your meeting the University’s academic entry requirements and abiding by the University’s rules and regulations. To be eligible to apply for a scholarship you will need to have been offered a place to study at Buckingham.

For details of our current range of scholarships and bursaries please see our website:

https://www.buckingham.ac.uk/admissions/scholarships

The Uni


Course location:

University of Buckingham

Department:

International Studies

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Social sciences

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

44%
UK students
56%
International students
71%
Male students
29%
Female students
64%
2:1 or above
6%
Drop out rate

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Social sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education
90%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

28%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
11%
Public services and other associate professionals
8%
Business, research and administrative professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This section covers a range of subjects that are often very different, so if you have a particular course in mind, the data here might not fully reflect the possible outcomes from your particular choice. Graduates from these subjects tend to do similar sorts of things to graduates from other social studies courses, so welfare and community roles are common, as are education, whilst graduates also often go into management, marketing and HR jobs and jobs in the police, and employment rates are good in general — but talk to course tutors and attend open days and try to get stats for the course you’re interested in.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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