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University of Bradford

Forensic Science

UCAS Code: F410

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

112 UCAS tariff points to include A-level Chemistry minimum grade B. Please note that where a science A-level is taken, the University will require applicants to pass the practical element (for A levels awarded from August 2017 onwards).

As UCAS Tariff. Science subject required. Must include a minimum of 12 credits of Chemistry at minimum Distinction.

112 UCAS tariff points to include Higher Level Chemistry at grade 6 and two other Higher Level subjects at grade 5. Plus HL 3 or SL 4 in Maths and English Language and Literature A or English B. (Language A: Literature, Literature and Performance and Language ab initio are not accepted).

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

As UCAS tariff. Science subject required - must include a minimum of three Chemistry-related units.

As UCAS Tariff. To include Scottish Advanced Higher Chemistry at minimum grade B.

UCAS Tariff

112

To include A-level Chemistry minimum grade B. Plus GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or 4 (equivalents accepted).

71%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subjects

Forensic science

Chemistry

This Forensic Science degree focuses on the processing and analysis of physical evidence from crime scenes.

The course emphasises the application of science - in particular analytical chemistry - and stresses the importance of quality assurance procedures in a forensic setting.

A characteristic of the University of Bradford's approach is the integration of practical skills training within a good theoretical framework – whether in terms of crime scene investigation, the collection, examination and interpretation of physical evidence, laboratory processing and analysis.

The course provides you with a sound knowledge of how scientific techniques can be used within forensic investigations, and allows you to explore a challenging area of applied science. You will develop into a professional with the scientific skills to work within areas such as crime scene investigation, forensic science and related laboratory areas.

Throughout your degree, you will acquire skills that will be useful in whatever profession they choose to follow. These include project and time management, critical review and analytical thinking, presentational skills, computer and other applied IT skills and the management of data. These will be taught, practised and assessed.

Bradford was the first university in the UK to offer a forensics science degree, and we continue to develop the programme to ensure that it is up-to-date with the requirements of the forensics sector.

As such, we have refocused the forensics degree to offer a solid understanding of fundamental chemistry in stages 2 and 3, with a focused final year dedicated to the application of forensic science.

Crime scene techniques are taught in our dedicated crime scene facility, with analysis of evidence supported by a forensics laboratory and the University’s Centre for Chemical and Structural Analysis.

The interdisciplinary nature of our research at Bradford means we can call upon expertise from our colleagues in archaeology who use forensics science techniques to study human remains, such as the Llullaillaco Maiden, discovered in 1999.

**Professional accreditation**
This course is accredited by The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences.

**Rankings**
We are ranked 3rd in the UK for Forensic Science in the Complete University Guide 2020.

Modules

Year 1:Inorganic Chemistry 1 (core), Organic Chemistry 1 (core), Physical Chemistry 1 (core), Practical Chemistry 1 (core), Principles of Forensic and Crime Scene Investigation (core) Year 2: Forensic Examination and Analysis of Physical Evidence (core), Inorganic Chemistry 2 (core), Organic Chemistry 2 (core), Physical Chemistry 2 (core), Practical Chemistry 2 (core) Year 3: Analysis of Controlled Substances (core), Analytical Short Courses A (core), Interpretation and Presentation of Forensic Evidence for Forensic Science (core), Professional Development: Forensic Enquiry and Critical Case Study (core), Stage 3 Research Project (core), Forensic Anthropology and Taphonomy for Forensic Scientists (option), Forensic Archaeology and Taphonomy for Forensic Scientists (option)

Assessment methods

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars, laboratory practicals, workshops, case studies and directed study. Directed study will include directed reading of selected textbooks, specified source literature and open learning materials, directed web-based materials, report writing and other assignments. There will also be an individual project/dissertation. You will be assessed by written closed-book examinations using constructed (essays, short answers) and selected response (MCQ) questions and a variety of coursework assignments, including laboratory reports, oral presentations and dissertations. There will also be involvement in laboratory, small-group workshops, case-based work and projects (individual and small group). You will be assessed by critical appraisal, case analysis and critique, case presentations, laboratory reports and dissertations. At Stage 3, essays, the journal critique and essay-based examinations provide a format to critically evaluate the key themes of the degree. Practical portfolios and worksheets allow you to demonstrate your understanding of forensic laboratory techniques.
The research dissertation develops your ability to undertake independent research and plan this research effectively. Presentations, the witness statement and the mock court exercise will develop your professional oral and written presentation skills.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£18,420
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University of Bradford

Department:

School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

66%
low
Forensic science
76%
low
Chemistry

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Forensic and archaeological sciences

Teaching and learning

87%
Staff make the subject interesting
81%
Staff are good at explaining things
81%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
84%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed

Resources and organisation

95%
IT resources
68%
Course specific equipment and facilities
44%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

75%
UK students
25%
International students
30%
Male students
70%
Female students
67%
2:1 or above
9%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

D
C
A

Chemistry

Teaching and learning

77%
Staff make the subject interesting
91%
Staff are good at explaining things
88%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
85%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

83%
Library resources
88%
IT resources
88%
Course specific equipment and facilities
80%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

89%
UK students
11%
International students
54%
Male students
46%
Female students
41%
2:1 or above
9%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
D
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Forensic and archaeological sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,800
low
Average annual salary
97%
med
Employed or in further education
65%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

14%
Natural and social science professionals
13%
Science, engineering and production technicians
10%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The statistics here primarily reflect the prospects for forensic science graduates - they make up over three quarters of the group. While there are not a lot of jobs available in forensics itself just at the moment, reflected in the overall unemployment rates for forensic science graduates, there are still jobs for graduates from these subjects as they learn useful analysis techniques that some employers can find in short supply. Last year's graduates went into analysis work in labs, technician roles and general research, and for those looking a little wider, business roles and management also employed forensics graduates. Some graduates join the police with this degree and that can be a good source of sponsorship and work experience.

Chemistry

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,732
low
Average annual salary
93%
low
Employed or in further education
98%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

34%
Science, engineering and production technicians
24%
Natural and social science professionals
9%
Other elementary services occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Chemistry graduates are in demand from a wide range of industries, from the food, oil, chemicals and pharmaceuticals to consultancy, technical analysis and teaching. They're also prized by business and finance employers for their research and data handling skills — anywhere there is research and data to be explained, you can find chemistry grads. If you want a career in research, you need a doctorate, so start planning now if you fancy one of these exciting and challenging jobs - but good students can usually get grants to take a doctorate, so don't worry about the financing if you think you have what it takes. The recession wasn’t too kind to chemists, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry (one of the key employers for chemists), but things are getting back to normal for this flexible group and it's one of the few degrees that is bucking the current trend and increasing graduate numbers.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here