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Teesside University

Crime Scene Science (with Foundation Year)

UCAS Code: BF94

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


Pass Access Course.

Grade PM.

UCAS Tariff

32-88

Offers tailored to individual circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

4years

Full-time including foundation year | 2018

Other options

5 years | Sandwich including foundation year | 2018

Subjects

Anatomy, physiology and pathology

Forensic and archaeological sciences

Summary:
This BSc (Hons) Crime Scene Science (Extended) degree course includes an integrated foundation year - ideal if you don't have the required entry qualifications for direct admission to Year 1 of our BSc (Hons) degree course.

Course details:
This accredited degree course prepares you to play an important role in modern society. As a multidisciplinary area of study within the broader field of forensic science, you explore scientific techniques to help investigate and deter crime in different environments.At Teesside University our students have access to extensive facilities in crime scene science, and to many staff who are former practitioners in crime scene investigation and bring operational experience to the classroom. Our course teaches you to manage the forensic process from start to finish. You develop skills in gathering, recording, evaluating and presenting evidence, as well as understanding the science behind forensic analysis. In addition to preparing you as a crime scene investigator, this course can lead to a range of employment openings, for example as a police intelligence analyst, environmental crime officer and insurance fraud investigator.

After the course:
Graduates careers can include crime scene investigator, police officer, intelligence analyst, detention officer, or you could seek employment with agencies or government organisations such as the Environment Agency, HM Revenue & Customs, the prison service or local government. Graduates are also well placed to seek careers in the law sector.

Modules

Access course information through Teesside University’s website using the course details link provided.

Assessment methods

The first year of this course has been designed to provide a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects, examinations), but you are also expected to spend time on your own, called self-study time, to review lecture notes, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. One module in each year of your study, excluding your first year (Level 3), involves a compulsory one-week block delivery period. This intensive problem-solving week, provides you with an opportunity to focus your attention on particular problems and enhance your team-working and employability skills. Your course involves a range of types of assessments including research assignments, laboratory work, presentations and tests.

The Uni


Course location:

Teesside University

Department:

Crime, Forensic and Investigative Sciences

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

93%
high
Anatomy, physiology and pathology
70%
low
Forensic and archaeological sciences

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Anatomy, physiology and pathology

Teaching and learning

100%
Staff make the subject interesting
100%
Staff are good at explaining things
100%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
97%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

94%
Library resources
100%
IT resources
94%
Course specific equipment and facilities
78%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

89%
UK students
11%
International students
29%
Male students
71%
Female students
80%
2:1 or above
0%
Drop out rate
352

Forensic and archaeological sciences

Teaching and learning

84%
Staff make the subject interesting
86%
Staff are good at explaining things
82%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
90%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

86%
Library resources
92%
IT resources
86%
Course specific equipment and facilities
55%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
38%
Male students
62%
Female students
64%
2:1 or above
12%
Drop out rate
317

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Anatomy, physiology and pathology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

100%
med
Employed or in further education
62%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The stats here cover not just anatomy, physiology and pathology courses, but also neuroscience and physiotherapy. Physiotherapy is much the most popular of the four. So, a lot of the data you’re looking at is really for physiotherapists, who have excellent employment rates - although all the subjects under this group do better than average. Anatomy and physiology graduates often take further study — usually moving on to a medical degree - and neurosciences graduates opt for a more academic route in study. Pathology graduates tend to go into work. Physiotherapy graduates mainly go straight into work, and a large majority got into physiotherapy roles within six months of graduation in 2016, usually either in hospitals or private practice. There are shortages of graduates in all of these disciplines although issues with funding roles, particularly in physiotherapy, still mean that these degrees are not a guaranteed path to a job - but the chances of getting a job are very good.

Forensic and archaeological sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

96%
med
Employed or in further education
92%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

12%
Information technology and telecommunications professionals
10%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
8%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The statistics here primarily reflect the prospects for forensic science graduates - they make up over three quarters of the group. While there are not a lot of jobs available in forensics itself just at the moment, reflected in the overall unemployment rates for forensic science graduates, there are still jobs for graduates from these subjects as they learn useful analysis techniques that some employers can find in short supply. Last year's graduates went into analysis work in labs, technician roles and general research, and for those looking a little wider, business roles and management also employed forensics graduates. Some graduates join the police with this degree and that can be a good source of sponsorship and work experience.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here