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Teesside University, Middlesbrough

Aerospace Engineering with Industry (with Foundation Year)

UCAS Code: H406

Bachelor of Engineering (with Honours) - BEng (Hon)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

32-88
60%
Applicants receiving offers

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About this course


Course option

5years

Sandwich including foundation year | 2019

Subject

Aerospace engineering

**Summary**: This BEng (Hons) Aerospace Engineering with Industry degree includes an integrated foundation year if you do not have the appropriate subjects and/or grades for entry to year one of the degree and includes a work placement year. The foundation year helps you develop your knowledge in mathematics and other important subjects to enable you to proceed confidently through the remainder of the programme.

**Course details**: The full degree includes a range of fundamental topics in mechanical engineering, electrical and electronic engineering, materials engineering and design, as well as specialist aerospace and aeronautical topics such as space mechanics, aerodynamics, aircraft performance, flight dynamics, avionics and aircraft systems, aircraft structures and propulsion systems. As part of your course you take a free flight test course in your second year. You fly in a Jetstream aircraft acquiring flight data as the aircraft undergoes a series of pre-planned manoeuvres. You use data and theory covered in the classroom, to calculate the flight and performance characteristics of the aircraft. Transportation, accommodation and the flight tests are provided. You are taught by experienced staff with backgrounds in either industry or the Royal Air Force who can bring real-life experience to the classroom. You have access to a wide range of well-equipped laboratories which include fixed and rotary wing aircraft and their components. Your degree programme combines an employability enhancing curriculum with significant practical work, small manageable laboratory group sizes, friendly and accessible lecturing staff.

**After the course**: Most students who join an aerospace engineering programme do so because of their passion for flight and engineering - a combination that is both enjoyable and rewarding in terms of career prospects. Most aerospace engineering graduates seek careers in companies directly or indirectly linked to the aerospace industry. Your skills and knowledge will also be relevant to other sectors such as the automobile, engineering process, oil and gas, electronics, electrical engineering and renewable energy industries.

Modules

Access course information through Teesside University’s website using the course details link provided.

Assessment methods

Your programme includes a range of assessments including coursework assignments, project reports and formal examinations. You are expected to attend a range of lectures, small-group tutorials and hands-on laboratory sessions. Part of your programme also involves a substantial research-based project. The programme provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (lectures, tutorials, laboratory work, projects and examinations). You are also expected to spend time on your own - this self-study time is to review lecture notes, prepare coursework assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments.

You typically spend four out of five days a week in classes and laboratories at the University. One day each week transport is provided to take you to our facility in Hartlepool to use the laboratories, facilities, workshops and aircraft to perform group design and project work, as well as laboratory work associated with some of your technical modules.

The Uni


Course location:

Teesside University

Department:

Engineering

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Aeronautical and aerospace engineering

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

90%
UK students
10%
International students
90%
Male students
10%
Female students
67%
2:1 or above
18%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Aeronautical and aerospace engineering

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
low
Average annual salary
90%
low
Employed or in further education
100%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

47%
Engineering professionals
9%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
6%
Science, engineering and production technicians
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Just over a thousand UK graduates got a degree in aerospace engineering in 2015. There are a few dedicated employers, unevenly spread around the country, and so there's often competition for graduates looking for their first job - which leads to a relatively high (although improving) early unemployment rate, and a good grade is particularly important for graduates. Sponsorship and work experience can be key if you're after the most sought-after roles in the industry. Starting salaries are usually good and graduates commonly go into the aerospace (yes, this does include manufacture of equipment for satellites and space operations) and defence industries. Bear in mind that a lot of courses are four years long, and lead to an MEng qualification — this is necessary if you want to become a Chartered Engineer.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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