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Swansea University

Medicine (Graduate Entry)

UCAS Code: A101

Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery - MB BCh

Entry requirements


GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSEs: English/Welsh Grade C, Mathematics Grade C

Equivalent to GCSE English Grade C and Mathematics Grade C

Equivalent to GCSE English Grade C and Mathematics Grade C

12%
Applicants receiving offers

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

About this course


Course option

4years

Full-time | 2018

Subject

Pre-clinical medicine

Graduate Entry Medicine at Swansea University Medical School is open to graduates of any discipline and has welcomed candidates with backgrounds as diverse as fine art and genetics.
Applications are welcomed from individuals with clear communication skills, an aptitude for problem solving and coping with pressure, a keen sense of insight and integrity, and most of all a passion for medicine.

There is a high level of clinical contact from the outset of the course:

- Self-selected Learning Opportunities in the Clinical Setting (LOCS)

- Clinical Apprenticeships

- Junior Assistantships

- Specialty Attachments

- Community Based Learning

There is also a Shadowing period at end of Year 4 prior to becoming a foundation doctor (F1). This 6 week Clinical Placement allows students to “shadow” F1 doctors in their allocated post in Wales or join the all-Wales ‘shadow’ programme.

Swansea University Medical School is one of the UK’s fastest growing medical schools and is currently ranked 3rd in the UK by the Complete University Guide Subject League Tables 2018. It offers a comprehensive programme of Undergraduate and Postgraduate courses spanning medicine, health, life science and chemistry to meet tomorrow’s science and healthcare challenges. As part of its commitment to widening access to medicine, Swansea University Medical School also offers dedicated pathways to Graduate Entry Medicine from its undergraduate Applied Medical Sciences, Medical Biochemistry and Medical Genetics degrees. Visit http://www.swansea.ac.uk/medicine/learningandteaching/pathway/ to find out more.

Swansea University Medical School is home to outstanding facilities including:

- £100m Institute of Life Science, Wales’ premier life sciences and healthcare research and business incubator

- The Centre for NanoHealth

- The UK National Mass Spectrometry Facility

- The Data Science building

Its UK and world-leading scientists, medical entrepreneurs and clinicians participate as teachers and supervisors. They also work closely with NHS partners and affiliate businesses to provide a vibrant, innovative community making great strides in teaching, research and industry throughout Wales, the UK and internationally.

""We hope and believe that studying Graduate Entry Medicine at Swansea University Medical School will prepare you to approach your future practice with confidence and competence, with an awareness of your responsibilities to patients, families, other clinicians, to your profession and to society. We also hope that you will join the many other graduates from Swansea that choose to stay to practise in Wales"" Professor Any Grant, Dean of Medical Education.

Modules

The Programme consists of Phase I (Years 1 + 2) and Phase II (Years 3 + 4) with 3 Modules – Doctor as a Scholar and Scientist, Doctor as a Practitioner and Doctor as a Professional, reflecting the standards for medical education and training set out by the General Medical Council (GMC).

The innovative, patient-focused curriculum has been designed to reflect the way in which clinicians approach patients and how patients present to doctors, allowing students to develop a way of thinking and engaging with information that mimics real-life clinical practice. Through its spiral approach, students acquire layers of knowledge and consolidate learning by re-visiting topics through new cases, building up a repertoire of clinical undertanding and skills.

Core modules build the foundations of scientific knowledge and clinical skills required for the practice of medicine. They are structured around 6 body system ‘Themes’ - Behaviour, Defence, Development, Movement, Nutrition and Transport - with clinical cases presented in learning blocks.

Students participate in a combination of case-based lectures and skill building within a safe but clinically-focused environment. They are also introduced to the concept of professionalism - an approach that is essential for good medical practice.

Assessment methods

Assessment is closely matched to the curriculum, the defined learning outcomes and learning and teaching methods.

Assessments in the Graduate Entry Medicine programme have three main functions.

1. To help focus students’ learning and to help demonstrate whether or not the standards have been achieved in respect to the defined learning outcomes.
2. To provide regular systematic information on students’ progress throughout the programme so that remedial action can be taken by students and staff as required.
3. To ensure that students progressing to the next stage of their training have met the prescribed learning outcomes.

The assessment approach reflects the teaching ethos of the programme by promoting continuing reflection on progress. Students are formally assessed at regular intervals during the course and these assessments use standard assessment formats throughout the entire four years of the course. Although the formats remain predominantly similar, their complexity and challenge increases in parallel with the abilities of the students. These assessments are, therefore, designed to measure global ability in the relevant domain with the aim of encouraging students to integrate and regularly maintain their knowledge and skills.

Extra funding

Graduate Entry Medicine is a 4 year programme and funding for the first year differs significantly from subsequnt years.

Year 1:

England and Wales Domiciled Students will have to self fund £3,465 of the fees and should apply to Student Finance England/Wales for a Tuition Fee Loan to cover the remaining £5,535.

You are also eligible to apply for a full income assessed student Maintenance Loan from Student Finance England/Wales. You will NOT be eligible to receive any Maintenance Grants or any NHS Bursary funding but you may be eligible for Supplementary Grants such as Parental Learning Allowance (PLA), Adult Dependents Grant (ADG), and Childcare Grant (CCG) and will need to apply for these with your student loan. Again, you should apply to Student Finance England/Wales.

Funding regimes for students who obtained their previous degree outside of the UK may differ. Please contact the Money@UniLife team for more information.

Years 2, 3 and 4

£3,465 of the £9,000 tuition fees is paid by the NHS Bursary Scheme. Students will again be eligible to apply for a student loan to fund the £5,535 short fall in tuition fees not funded via the NHS Bursary.

Students are eligible to apply to Student Finance England/Wales for a reduced rate non means tested Maintenance Loan of £2,324.

NHS Funding is available in the form of a means-tested NHS bursary (based on household income) and a NHS grant of £1,000.

If you are eligible for supplementary grants (PLA, ADG or CCG) these will be made available through the NHS and not Student Finance England/Wales (as in the First Year).

For up to date information and entitlement amounts, as well as the online application we would recommend that you visit the NHS Student Bursary website.

If you are a student from Scotland, Northern Ireland, the EU or overseas please contact the Money@CampusLife team for further funding information.

The Uni


Course location:

Singleton Park Campus

Department:

Medicine

TEF rating:
Read full university profile

What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

87%
med
Pre-clinical medicine

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Medicine (non-specific)

Teaching and learning

96%
Staff make the subject interesting
89%
Staff are good at explaining things
91%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
98%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

96%
Library resources
96%
IT resources
100%
Course specific equipment and facilities
76%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

97%
UK students
3%
International students
53%
Male students
47%
Female students
0%
2:1 or above
1%
Drop out rate
330

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Medicine (non-specific)

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,000
med
Average annual salary
100%
med
Employed or in further education
92%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

6%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
6%
Sales, marketing and related associate professionals
5%
Business, research and administrative professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Medical degrees are some of the most difficult courses to enter, but very nearly all graduates go on to good, well-paid and secure careers in health. If you're taking a shorter pre-clinical course, you'll need to continue on to further medical training to complete an accredited qualification, which explains why a high proportion of those grads are 'in further study' six months later. And at the moment, the UK is short of doctors and we have upped the number of places available, so demand remains high.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here