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Swansea University

Classical Civilisation and Medieval Studies

UCAS Code: QVV1
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

120-128

% applicants receiving offers

Not Available

Subjects
  • Classical studies
  • History by period
Student score
83% MED
83% MED
% employed or in further study
94% MED
96% MED
Average graduate salary
£16.3k LOW
£16k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
BBB-ABB

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
MDD

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MDD

International Baccalaureate
33

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 120-128 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

Not Available

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

As a result of the sweeping changes to PGT funding already implemented for English domiciled students and now proposed for Welsh domiciled students, the College of Arts and Humanities at Swansea University is bringing the Centenary Graduate Scholarship awards to a close. The scheme will continue to operate as was advertised for students who enrolled on undergraduate schemes up to and including September 2016. The College intends to promote full details of future PGT funding sources to all students as soon as government policy becomes legislation. We have a wide range of employability opportunities that enhance the career prospects for our students. We offer a semester abroad in Hong Kong. We have credit bearing work placements and also volunteer programmes, such as the Schools Literacy scheme where our students go into local primary schools to teach literacy skills to pupils. All students in the College have a personal tutor who provides academic and pastoral support.

Modules

Classical Civilisation Level 1: Interpreting Antiquity; Classical Athens; Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Civilisation 1; Beginning Latin Language 1; Intermediate Latin Language; Further Latin 1; Beginning Greek Language 1; Intermediate Greek Language 1; Further Greek 1; Egyptian Language 1; Augustan Rome; Ovidâ??s â??Metamorphosesâ??: the Transformations of Mythology; Introduction to Ancient Egyptian History and Civilisation 2; Beginning Latin Language 2; Intermediate Latin Language 2; Further Latin 2; Beginning Greek Language 2; Intermediate Greek Language 2; Further Greek 2; Egyptian Language 2. Level 2: Writing Ancient History; Archaic Greece (Level 2); Armies and Enemies of Imperial Rome; Women and Society 1; Sport, Games & Entertainment in the Greek and Roman worlds; Greek City States; Roman Empire; Rome and the Mediterranean, 264-146 BC; The History and Archaeology of Roman Britain; Athenian Democracy; Roman Republic; Ancient Technology and Engineering; War and Warfare in the Ancient World; Alexander and the Hellenistic world; Study Trip (Greeks and Romans in Southern Italy); Athens to Los Alamos: Science in the ancient modern worlds; An Introduction to the archaeology of Wales; Heirs of Rome; Level 2 Project; Reading Classical Civilisation; The Greek Romance: Sea, Sun and Sex; Roman Comic Novel; Homer and Heroism: Homer; Decision and Responsibility: Tragic Predicament; Greek Historians; Platoâ??s Republic; Beginning Latin 1; Beginning Latin 2; Intermediate Latin 1; Intermediate Latin 2; Further Latin 1; Further Latin 2; Advanced Latin 1; Advanced Latin 2; Teaching Literacy through Latin; Beginning Greek 1; Beginning Greek 2; Intermediate Greek 1; Intermediate Greek 2; Further Greek 1; Further Greek 2; Advanced Greek 1; Advanced Greek 2; Greek City States; Athens to Los Alamos: Science in the ancient modern worlds; Medieval Britain, 1250-1520; State of the Church in Later Medieval Europe; An introduction to the archaeology of Wales; Ancient Technology and Engineering; Study Trip (Rome); War and Society in the Anglo-Norman World; Heirs of Rome; Sport, Games & Entertainment in the Greek and Roman Worlds; Athenian Democracy; Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology; Egyptian Art and Architecture; Egyptian Language 3; Egyptian Language 1; Egyptian Language 4; Egyptian Language 2; The Amarna Age; Culture and Cultural Influence in Ancient Egypt. Level 3: Dissertation; Women and Society I; Sport, Games & Entertainment in the Greek and Roman worlds; Greek City States; Rome and the Mediterranean 264-146 BC; The History and Archaeology of Roman Britain; Athenian Democracy; Late Antiquity; Roman Republic; Archaic Greece; Alexander and the Hellenistic world; Invention, Innovations and Technological Revolutions; History of Violence Ancient and Medieval History Modules 2013-14; Alexandria; The Greek Romance: Sea, Sun and Sex; Roman Comic Novel; Homer and Heroism: Homer; Classics in the Cinema; Decision and Responsibility: The Tragic Predicament; Greek Historians; Platoâ??s Republic; Intermediate Greek 1; Intermediate Greek 2; Further Greek 1; Further Greek 2; Advanced Greek 1; Advanced Greek 2; Advanced Greek 3; Advanced Greek 4; Intermediate Latin 1; Intermediate Latin Language II; Further Latin 1; Further Latin 2; Advanced Latin 1; Advanced Latin 2; Advanced Latin 3; Advanced Latin 4; Teaching Literacy through Latin. History Level 1: Medieval Europe: An Introduction; World History 1500-1800; Europe of Extremes: 1789-1989; Making History. Level 2: Practice of History (compulsory); Group A; Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe; Digital War; From War to Revolution: France 1914-1968; Victorian Cities; The First World War; History of Mass Media in the UK; Occupied Europe, 1938-1947; Post-War Reconstruction; European Fascisms; Genocide; British Politics and Public Policy; Welsh Century, 1847-1947; History of Political Thought; Hanes ar y Teledu; Making of Transatlantic America; Researching and Re-telling the Past (Copper Industry of Swansea); The American South; Medicine and Society in Britain, 1300-2000; Athens to Los Alamos: Science in the Ancient and Modern Worlds; Rome and the Mediterranean; Roman Empire II; Heirs of Rome; Credoauâ??r Cymry: Astudio Athroniaeth ac Athrawiaeth Gymreig o Safbwynt Rhyngwladol; War and Society in the Anglo-Norman World; State of the Church in Later Medieval Europe; Golden Age of Iberia, 1450-1700; Medieval Britain; British Atlantic World 1550-1760; Europe 1500-1650: Renaissance, Reformation and Religious War; An introduction to the archaeology of Wales; Armies and Enemies of Imperial Rome. Level 3: The End of the Roman Republic; Welsh society in the later Middle Ages, 1267-1536; The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusades; Renaissance Venice; The Legal History of Wales: Medieval Welsh Law; The Grand Tour; Family, Sex and Intimacy in Early Modern England; European Empires in the East; Revolutionary America; Media and Society in the 1930s; Invention, Innovation and Technological Revolutions; American Civil War in History and Memory; Digital Detectives; History of Violence; Weimar Germany; Spanish Civil War; Prisoners of War in Twentieth Century Conflicts; Hospitals in History c1700-1948; Cenedlaetholdeb, Crefydd a Chyfiawnder: Hanes Athroniaeth yr 20fed Ganrif yng Nghymru; Concroâ??r Byd: Twf a Chwymp; Ymerodraethau Prydain a Ffrainc; Gwleidyddiaeth Meddylfryd Gwyddonol yr Ugeinfed Ganrif Gynnar; The Legal History of Wales II: the modern period; Gunfighter Nation: the West in History, Mythology and Fiction; America in the 1960s; Aftermaths of War.

Swansea University

Singleton Campus

Swansea University offers the right balance of excellent teaching and research, matched by an enviable quality of life. A modern approach to learning is backed by excellent facilities and high standards of teaching. Set in parkland overlooking Swansea Bay on the edge of the breathtaking Gower Peninsula, Swansea surely offers one of the best university locations in the world.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
15%
85%

Year 1

17%
83%

Year 2

15%
79%
6%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
40%
60%

Year 1

38%
62%

Year 2

17%
75%
8%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 87%
Student score 83% MED
Able to access IT resources

91%

Staff made the subject interesting

90%

Library resources are satisfactory

91%

Feedback on work has been helpful

76%

Feedback on work has been prompt

68%

Staff are good at explaining things

90%

Received sufficient advice and support

77%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
3% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
46% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
291 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
67% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
5% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 94% MED
Average graduate salary £16.3k LOW
Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

9%

Graduates who are other administrative occupations

4%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

4%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Around 1,150 graduates received classics degrees in 2012 and more than a quarter of those went on to further study, usually a Masters, and often in a different subject such as law, history or archaeology. Those who did go into work tended to find jobs in London or the South East, and be working in education, marketing and advertising or the finance industry. Personal contacts were particularly important for these graduates in finding their first job, so good networks may help your job search when the time comes.
Icon bubble

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 94%
Student score 83% MED
Able to access IT resources

88%

Staff made the subject interesting

89%

Library resources are satisfactory

89%

Feedback on work has been helpful

71%

Feedback on work has been prompt

74%

Staff are good at explaining things

93%

Received sufficient advice and support

85%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
2% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
38% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
4% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
306 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
82% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
6% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £16k MED
Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

9%

Graduates who are other elementary services occupations

6%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

12%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
History is a very popular subject – in 2012, nearly 11,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs. Consequently, history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many – probably most – jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, management and sales and marketing. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year – only law saw more graduates continue on to study. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, politics and museum studies were also popular postgraduate courses.
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