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St Mary's University, Twickenham

Philosophy and Psychology

UCAS Code: CV85
BA/BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
BA/BSc (Hons) 12 months part-time 2017
Ucas points guide

104

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Subjects
  • Psychology
  • Philosophy
Student score
83% MED
79% LOW
% employed or in further study
100% HIGH
95% MED
Average graduate salary
£19k HIGH
£18k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

Scottish Highers
BBBC

BBBC

BTEC Diploma
MMD

BTEC Certificate
DD

BTEC Level 3 Diploma
DD*

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MMD

International Baccalaureate
28

UCAS tariff points
104

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 104 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Philosophy at St Mary's starts at the beginning and helps students to see how philosophy emerged as a distinct undertaking. Students are encouraged to think and debate, and to engage with their classmates and lecturers throughout their degree. Topics covered include dialogue, psychology, science, art, popular culture, and more. Philosophy graduates have gone on to work as accountants, in the civil service, in advertising, in information technology, in teaching, in marketing, in law, and in human resources management. The Psychology Degree at St Maryâ??s provides a BPS accredited route. Graduation through the accredited route confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society (provided the minimum qualification of second class honours is achieved). St Mary's also provide non-accredited routes, which may be of particular interest to students wishing to read for a Joint Honours Degree. The staff are research active and their work covers areas such as the psychological effects of brain damage, attentional biases associated with anxiety, intergenerational relationships within the family context, and factors and perceptions in social inequality.

Modules

Philosophy Level 1: This is an introductory year, in which students acquire a solid understanding of core issues and thinkers in philosophy, as well as the necessary skills to study philosophy at a higher level; modules include: reason, argument, evidence; key texts of antiquity; revolutions in thought: 1500-1800; moral philosophy. Level 2 and 3: The content of the degree will be increasingly decided by students interests and their future professional needs; modules include: socratic dialogue/philosophy and communication; in year three single honours students as well as students majoring in philosophy write a dissertation; modules include: bioethics; environmental philosophy; modern political thought; moral philosophy: key thinkers;philosophy and literature; philosophy and gender; metaphysics; Eastern philosophies; medieval classics; modern and contemporary philosophy; philosophy of history; philosophy reading module; workplace experience; mind, soul and psychology; Buddhism; issues in religion and science; issues of identity; philosophy of health; epistemology; Wittgenstein; Aesthetics. Psychology Level 1: the focus of level 1 is on understanding how a contemporary psychologist, as opposed to the psychologist portrayed in the media, thinks about and investigates central questions of interest; students begin to develop an understanding of the different perspectives followed in psychology, and how these guide our investigations and explanations of human behaviour and mental processes. Modules include: introduction to psychology; abnormal psychology; issues in psychology; research methods and statistics I. Level 2: The theme for level 2 is â??evaluating psychologyâ??; students build on the skills and knowledge they developed during level 1; the modules taken will include: research methods and statistics II; practical psychology laboratory; memory; social psychology; child development; health psychology; psychology of education; contemporary issues; psychology of ageing; work experience. Level 3: The theme of level 3 is â??limitations of psychologyâ??; students are now considering the perspectives and themes that have been introduced at an advanced level, and in considerable depth; students are beginning to question the limits of our knowledge and understanding, and show an appreciation for the temporary nature of scientific knowledge; students are advancing their understanding of the relationship between empirical evidence and theory; in particular, how empirical evidence supports and constrains theories, and how theories guide the collection and interpretation of empirical data; modules include: independent study (determined by the route and pathway followed, but students take one of the following in psychology: empirical project, psychological review or work experience); directed study (compulsory for equalling students); eyewitness testimony; applied child psychology; political psychology; human relationships; neuropsychology of emotion; consciousness; individual differences; psychobiology; thinking and language; perception and attention; positive psychology.

St Mary's University, Twickenham

Campus

St Mary's University is unique in every sense of the word. As a student here, you'll be a part of more than an academic institution you'll also be in a close-knit community which has always valued diversity, sporting and academic brilliance and a sense of fun! Strawberry Hill House, a 300 year-old piece of gothic architecture, is the campus focal point.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 95%
Student score 83% MED
Able to access IT resources

91%

Staff made the subject interesting

90%

Library resources are satisfactory

90%

Feedback on work has been helpful

70%

Feedback on work has been prompt

67%

Staff are good at explaining things

91%

Received sufficient advice and support

83%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
9% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
79% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
5% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
299 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
69% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
15% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 100% HIGH
Average graduate salary £19k HIGH
Graduates who are other administrative occupations

8%

Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

6%

Graduates who are childcare and related personal services

6%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
One of the UK's fastest-growing subject at degree level, and the fourth most popular subject overall, one in 24 of all graduates last year had psychology degrees. As you'd expect with figures like that, jobs in psychology itself are incredibly competitive, so to stand a chance of securing one, you need to get a postgraduate qualification (probably a doctorate in most fields) and some relevant work experience. But even though there are so many psychology graduates – far more than there are jobs in psychology – this degree has a lower unemployment rate than average because its grads are so flexible and well-regarded by business. With a mix of good people skills and with excellent number and data handling skills, a psychology degree ticks most employers' boxes – but we'd suggest you don't drop your maths modules.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 83%
Student score 79% LOW
Able to access IT resources

87%

Staff made the subject interesting

83%

Library resources are satisfactory

63%

Feedback on work has been helpful

63%

Feedback on work has been prompt

58%

Staff are good at explaining things

88%

Received sufficient advice and support

83%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
11% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
50% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
34% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
261 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
55% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
34% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 95% MED
Average graduate salary £18k MED
Graduates who are other administrative occupations

10%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

9%

Graduates who are business, finance and related associate professionals

10%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Although there aren't a lot of jobs around for professional philosophers, philosophy degrees are an increasingly popular option, with more than 2,300 students graduating in a philosophy-related subject in 2012. Nearly a quarter of philosophy graduates take a postgraduate qualification, and it's a relatively common subject at both Masters and doctorate level – so if you think academic life might be for you, think ahead about how you might fund further study. For those who go into work, philosophy grads tend to go into education, management, marketing, community work, human resources and the finance industry, while a few even went into IT, where their logical training can be very useful.
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