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Royal Holloway, University of London

Physics with Particle Physics

UCAS Code: F370
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Physics
Student score
86% MED
% employed or in further study
91% MED
Average graduate salary
£20.7k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

AAA-ABB including Maths and Physics Where an applicant is taking the EPQ alongside A-levels, the EPQ will be taken into consideration and result in lower A-level grades being required. Socio-economics factors which may have impacted an applicant's education will be taken into consideration and alternative offers may be made to these applicants. Required subjects: Mathematics and Physics, plus a Pass in the practical element of any Science A-levels being taken General Studies and Critical thinking A-levels are not accepted At least five GCSEs at grade A*-C or 9-4 including English and Mathematics are also required.

Scottish Highers

AAABB including A in Maths and B in Physics.

Scottish Advanced Highers

AAA-ABB including Maths and Physics.

BTEC Diploma

Distinction Distinction plus A in A-level Maths and A in A-level Physics. Plus a Pass in the practical element of any Science A-levels taken. At least five GCSEs at grade A*-C or 9 - 4 including English and Mathematics

International Baccalaureate

6,5,5 at Higher Level including 6 in Maths at Higher Level and 5 in Physics at Higher Level with a minimum of 32 points overall.

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 128-144 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

With the discovery of the Higgs Boson, and as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model continues at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the study of particle physics remains more topical and relevant than ever before. On our three-year Physics with Particle Physics BSc course, we’ll cover everything found in our Physics course (F303/F300), but with special emphasis on the underlying Physics of fundamental particles, high-energy particle detectors and accelerator physics. You’ll join a field trip to CERN as part of the course. We teach Physics in an accessible and rigorous style through small group tutorials, problem classes, lectures, laboratory and computing assignments, teamwork, and one-to-one teaching in our laboratories. So you’ll always have a close-knit support system around you. Our department is research-intensive, which means our teaching is informed by the most up-to-date research. Our world-class research laboratories are devoted to the search for Dark Matter, building next generation particle accelerators and enabling discoveries in nanophysics, quantum devices, ultralow temperatures, superconductors, new materials and other frontiers. Students study in our research laboratories in their final year. We put a real emphasis on small group teaching – a close-knit, friendly and supportive environment with high staff-student ratio and an open door policy. We enjoy a strong track record of high student satisfaction in the annual National Student Survey. We’ve been awarded IOP Juno Champion and Athena SWAN silver awards for best practice in equality, promoting women in science and welcoming large cohorts of female students. Our research-intensive department based at our Surrey campus – well away from the light pollution of the big city – allows our telescopes to provide the best observational astronomy in the University of London. We have close ties with, and conduct research at major international laboratories such as CERN, ISIS and Diamond, plus collaborations with other major institutions around the world. This course is fully accredited by the Institute of Physics (IOP)


Mathematics for Scientists 1, Mathematics for Scientists 2, Scientific Skills 1, Scientific Skills 2, Classical Mechanics, Fields and Waves, Classical Matter, Physics of the Universe, Mathematical Methods, Scientific Computing Skills, Quantum Mechanics, Optics, Electromagnetism, Atomic and Nuclear Physics, Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics, The Solid State, Optics, Scientific Skills for MSci, Quantum Theory, Particle Physics, Particle Astrophysics In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies

Royal Holloway, University of London

Founders building

Royal Holloway has one of the most beautiful campus settings in the UK - including the historic Founder's building at the centre of student life and modern academic and social facilities all within easy reach of London. Beyond the buildings there are acres of woodland and open spaces. Over 2,600 Royal Holloway students participate in 100 clubs and societies offered by the students' union.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 95%
Student score 86% MED
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
17% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
26% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
7% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
373 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
68% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
14% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 91% MED
Average graduate salary £20.7k MED
Graduates who are business, research and administrative professionals


Graduates who are customer service occupations


Graduates who are information technology and telecommunications professionals


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Although the subject has seen a bit of resurgence in recent years, the UK is still felt to be short of physics graduates, and in particular physicists training as teachers. If you want a career in physics research — in all sorts of areas, from atmospheric physics to lasers - you'll probably need to take a doctorate, and so have a think about where you would like to do that and how you might fund it (the government funds many physics doctorates, so you might not find it as hard as you think). With that in mind, it's not surprising that just over a fifth of physics graduates go on to take doctorates when they finish their degree, and well over a third of physicists take some kind of postgraduate study in total. Physics is highly regarded and surprisingly versatile, which is why physics graduates who decide not to stay in education are more likely to go into well-paid jobs in the finance industry than they are to go into science. The demand and versatility of physics degrees goes to explain why they're amongst the best-paid science graduates.
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