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BA (Hons) 4 years full-time, abroad 2017
Ucas points guide

128-136

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Subjects
  • German studies
  • History by period
Student score
85% MED
84% MED
% employed or in further study
96% MED
96% MED
Average graduate salary
£21k HIGH
£21k HIGH
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
ABB-AAB

AAB-ABB including an Essay-Based subject. If German is taken at A level grade B is required. Preferred subject: History

Scottish Highers
Not Available

AABBB

Scottish Advanced Highers
AB

AB including an essay-based subject. If German is taken at Advanced Higher Level, a grade B is required

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Diploma
DD

International Baccalaureate
32

6,5,5 at Higher Level including an essay-based subject. If German is taken at Higher Level a 5 is required

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 128-136 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

You will be studying at two top-ranking departments with outstanding research records. The School of Modern Languages offers excellent quality equipment and dedicated language learning facilities. You will have the opportunity to explore a coherent and compelling historical framework that brings history alive under the guidance of internationally-renowned specialists. The History Department has a vibrant and friendly atmosphere and a global reputation for the quality of its teaching and research. You will have the opportunity to benefit from an immersive third year of study spent in a German-speaking environment. You can choose between partner universities such as Heidelberg, Munich and Vienna, teaching placements at German or Austrian schools, or work placements in business or industry.

Modules

German Year 1: German language 1; German language 2; reading German literature; truth, language and art: key questions in the humanities; modern Germany (history and society); introduction to comparative textual analysis; the birth of European film or reading European film 1. Year 2: German language 2 (grammar and translation); German language 2 (current affairs); history and politics as reflected in the German cinema from the 1930s to the 1990s; ideals and realities in German drama; narrative strategies in German prose fiction; introduction to modern European philosophy. Year 3: placement year. Year 4: German language 3. History Year 1: history and meanings part 1; history and meanings part 2; gods, men and power (an introduction to the ancient world, from homer to Mohammed); republics, kings and people (the foundations of European political thought from Plato to Rousseau); the rich tapestry of life (early modern England, Europe and the wider world, 1453-1789); conflict and identity in modern Europe, 1770-2000; Mao to Mandela (20th-century leaders of the non-western world); Rome to renaissance (an introduction to the middle ages); introduction to politics and government. Year 2 options: history of the British empire, 1763-1900; history of the British empire, 1899-1963; the rise and fall of the roman republic; Rome and its empire from Augustus to Commodus; globalising capital: Britain and the world, 1846-1913; the pursuit of power: Europe 1000-1250; religion, culture and society in Europe, 1000-1250; politics, pestilence and war in late medieval Europe, 1300-1500; the sacred and profane (cultural life in renaissance Europe); the European crucible, 1914-1945; the politics of postwar Europe, 1945-2000; 20th-century world history (the Asian resurgence); new worlds, lost worlds (the Tudor monarchy 1485-1603); killing the king (England in an age of revolutions 1603-1714); the Georgians (politics, society and culture 1688-1832); 19th-century Europe (society and culture, 1789-1890); 20th-century world history (the middle east, Africa and Latin America); medicine from antiquity to the medieval near east; the western powers and east Asia, 1839-1945; daily life in renaissance and baroque Italian cities (social and domestic life); Genghis khan and the Mongol legacy (1200-1500); the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires (1500-1700); international economic relations, 1917-1991; the Victorians, 1837-1901; modern British history, 1914-1973; history of the USA, 1787 to 1877; the united states in the 20th-century; Spain, 1898-1939; Spain from dictatorship to democracy, 1939-1989; awakening china: from the opium wars to the present day; the holy man. Year 3 options: England in the reign of Richard II; blasphemy, irreligion and the English enlightenment 1620-1720; religious culture in England, c.1375-1525; the causes and consequences of the fall of Constantinople, 1453; heresy, crusade and inquisition in southern France, 1140-c.1300; the empire in Victorian Britain, 1830-1870; Victorian social and political thought; berlin (a European metropolis in the 20th century); the history and historiography of the holocaust; the clash of powers and cultures (Sino-American relations during the cold war); enlightenment Paris, 1721-1789; Stalinism, 1917-1953; Christians and pagans from Constantine to Augustine (ad 306-430); representing authority from Henry VI to Charles II; Victorian Babylon (life, work and people in London, 1840-1890); comparing religious fundamentalisms in the 19th and 20th centuries; migration, identity and citizenship in modern Britain; the age of terror (terrorism from 1945 â?? present); Genghis khan and his empire, 1150-1300; photography, film and British society 1850-1965; china and the world: migration and diaspora, 1800-1945; Malcolm X and African American Islam; modern Delhi (from Mughals to megacity); bomb, a history (atomic weaponry and society in the 20th century).

Royal Holloway, University of London

Founders building

Royal Holloway has one of the most beautiful campus settings in the UK - including the historic Founder's building at the centre of student life and modern academic and social facilities all within easy reach of London. Beyond the buildings there are acres of woodland and open spaces. Over 2,600 Royal Holloway students participate in 100 clubs and societies offered by the students' union.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
17%
83%

Year 1

18%
82%

Year 2

100%

Year 3

14%
86%

Year 4

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
44%
43%
13%

Year 1

51%
35%
14%

Year 2

50%
50%

Year 3

47%
38%
15%

Year 4

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 100%
Student score 85% MED
Able to access IT resources

85%

Staff made the subject interesting

95%

Library resources are satisfactory

67%

Feedback on work has been helpful

62%

Feedback on work has been prompt

75%

Staff are good at explaining things

89%

Received sufficient advice and support

84%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
21% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
62% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
0% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
397 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
65% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
13% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £21k HIGH
Graduates who are public services and other associate professionals

6%

Graduates who are childcare and related personal services

5%

Graduates who are other administrative occupations

5%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
It's often said the UK doesn't produce enough modern language graduates, and graduates from German courses have a lot of options available to them when they complete their courses. The unemployment rates last year was lower than graduates in general. About one in six graduates got jobs in the EU – mostly as English teachers – which is much higher than for most subjects. The German economy is faring rather better than ours at the moment, so there may be other opportunities for ambitious graduates over there. But more graduates went to work in London, and those who want to stay at home to work find jobs anywhere where good communication skills are a must, particularly in education, translation, finance and advertising. But remember – whilst employers say they rate graduates who have more than one language, you need to have them as part of a whole package of good skills.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 92%
Student score 84% MED
Able to access IT resources

86%

Staff made the subject interesting

96%

Library resources are satisfactory

68%

Feedback on work has been helpful

78%

Feedback on work has been prompt

79%

Staff are good at explaining things

97%

Received sufficient advice and support

82%

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
8% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
56% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
6% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
369 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
94% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
3% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £21k HIGH
Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals

8%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

7%

Graduates who are other elementary services occupations

5%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
History is a very popular subject – in 2012, nearly 11,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs. Consequently, history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many – probably most – jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, management and sales and marketing. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year – only law saw more graduates continue on to study. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, politics and museum studies were also popular postgraduate courses.
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