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Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

BA Production Arts and Design

UCAS Code: 203F

Bachelor of Arts - BA

Entry requirements


Passes in two subjects at GCSE Advanced level

Passes in three subjects at Higher level

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2018

Subject

Drama

The Production Arts and Design programme has been designed to create a high-level conservatoire learning environment for aspiring scenic artists, prop makers, stage carpenters, costume makers, and set and costume designers. You will learn in an environment where your technical knowledge is as important as your creativity and individuality.You will be accepted based on your profile in one particular area, taken from the five subjects on offer (scenic art, set construction, costume construction, prop-making, and set and costume design). You will follow an individually-negotiated pathway based on a major and minor study to ensure a quality learning experience and afford you the opportunity to engage with the broad and diverse range of performance programmes.The opportunity to work with film-makers, dancers, musicians and actors is unique and the facilities in which we do this are second to none. The Wallace Studios at Speirs Locks has purpose-built production workshops and design studios and the Renfrew Street building houses five public performance spaces including a fully-equipped proscenium arch theatre and a black box studio theatre. The combination of professional venues, extensive workshops, construction spaces, design studios and the latest stage and workshop technologies provide a fantastic learning environment.As our standards are rooted in industry practice we have exceptionally strong links with professional partners from across the UK and beyond. We have very close relationships with the key Scottish national companies, such as Scottish Opera, the National Theatre of Scotland and Scottish Ballet as well as the majority of regional theatres such as the Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Pitlochry Festival Theatre and the Royal Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh. We work closely with industry to ensure the expertise you acquire is current, competitive and of the highest professional standard.

Modules

Students on this programme are interviewed and accepted based on their profile in one particular area of study taken from the five subjects on offer (scenic art, set construction, costume construction, prop making and set & costume design). This subject becomes their major study and is the basis for their pathway through the programme and potential employment opportunities after graduation.

Year One

You will experience all areas of the theatre production process as well as build initial skills and knowledge in your major subject. You will receive a broad based introduction to the production environment and the standard practices both in production arts and design and also in its sister programme production technology and management. In the five core subjects, the design process is examined through a range of projects, workshop rotations and collaborative projects culminating in the choice of a minor subject to compliment your major study pathway. You will also investigate the collaborative nature of production and performance have the opportunity to work with other year one students from across RCS.

Year Two

You will consolidate your skills and knowledge and be introduced to more advanced approaches and techniques including management and self-promotion.

Production Arts students engage with practice-based work on RCS productions as part of a collaborative team with students from third year. Processes, skills and techniques are gathered as well as the opportunity to observe senior students in managerial positions. Design students explore the design process from concept to final presentation through personal projects and begin the process of designing for a fully-realised production. This leads to an allocation as Designer for an RCS production – normally realised on stage in the first weeks of year three. Here begins your individual pathway, as negotiated with your Transitions Tutor, where learning is designed to promote your own individual development and achievement. Professional practice focuses on the development of the individual portfolio and personal promotion skills. You will also have ‘Choice’ modules where you can choose from a range of modules on offer from programmes across the institution, or undertake a negotiated project

Year Three

Year three enables you to consolidate of all of your learning and exploration and develop specialist skills in autonomous situations. Each student negotiates their individual pathway in third year to take advantage of the available production roles, personal projects, options modules and secondment opportunities. The secondment ensures you are making contacts with industry practitioners and potential employers. A showcase of work is exhibited and a range of potential employers are invited to view your work.

Assessment methods

Most work is assessed through staff observations of your practice but reflection underpins the approach to assessment, and reflective journals and summary statements form a key component of assessment in all modules. There is a strong emphasis on the assessment of process. Students in levels two and three engage in portfolio building as an element of professional development planning, specifically designed to aid their self-promotion, and transition into the workplace.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£1,820
per year
International
£15,513
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£1,820
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

Extra funding

The Royal Conservatoire is able to offer a number of entrance scholarships which are awarded as part of the audition/selection process on the basis of merit and financial need. Please see our website for more information - https://www.rcs.ac.uk/studyhere/scholarships/.

The Uni


Course location:

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Department:

School of Drama, Dance, Production and Film

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Drama

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

72%
UK students
28%
International students
43%
Male students
57%
Female students
8%
2:1 or above
5%
Drop out rate

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Drama

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£22,000
high
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
85%
low
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

71%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
13%
Design occupations
6%
Customer service occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Drama is a very popular degree subject — in 2015, over 5,000 degrees were awarded to UK graduates. With so many graduates around, jobs in acting are very sought-after and often gained through personal contacts, or through your careers service so be prepared to practise your people skills and to make full use of your university facilities. But there are lots of roles in the arts for drama graduates, in direction, production, audio-visual, set and clothing design and PR. The skills taught by drama courses can be useful elsewhere — a lot of the economy can use people who can perform and present in front of others, and so drama graduates can be found in teaching, management, advertising, project and events organisation and community work. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' — having several part-time jobs or commissions at once — one in ten drama graduates last year had more than one job on the go at once after six months. And starting salaries are not the best - but nevertheless the large majority of drama graduates going into acting still felt that it was just the job for them regardless of pay.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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