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Queen Mary University of London

Film Studies and History

UCAS Code: VW16
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

128

% applicants receiving offers

67%

Subjects
  • History by period
  • Cinematics & photography
Student score
89% HIGH
Not Available
% employed or in further study
96% MED
Not Available
Average graduate salary
£20k HIGH
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
ABB

History at grade B. Grade B in Film Studies or Media Studies (if offered) or a subject related to the course at grade B.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

Scottish Advanced Highers
ABB

History at grade B and grade B in Film or Media (if offered) or another relevant subject at grade B.

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Diploma
MD

All BTEC subjects will be considered depending on their relevance to the degree programme you are applying for.

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma
MDD

All BTEC subjects will be considered depending on their relevance to the degree programme you are applying for.

International Baccalaureate
32

655 in higher level subjects, to include History and Film/Media or a relevant subject at higher level.

UCAS tariff points
Not Available

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 128 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

67%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

This programme enables you to combine modules in film studies with modules in American, British and European history, and more particularly to explore the unique film cultures that developed in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United States throughout the twentieth century and beyond. You are encouraged to select pathways that combine modules on the history of a particular country, particularly those that focus on a countryâ??s film history and culture. In your final year, you work on primary source material either through a document-based special subject or through original research on a subject of your choice, leading to a 10-15,000 word dissertation

Modules

Year 1: History options include: historical writing for undergraduates; the American century: the united states since 1900; Europe since 1870; film options include: introduction to film studies; critical approaches to film: Alfred Hitchcock; European national cinemas; european film directors. Year 2: History options include: crises in Victorian thought; race in the United States: slavery to civil rights; revolution and stability in France from 1815 to the present; film options include: cinema and society in the United States: 1930-1960; screening South American political history. Year 3: History options include: research dissertation; the science and politics of race in Europe since the nineteenth century; ideas of the unconscious; film options include: screening the past: the French history film in the 1980s and 1990s.

Queen Mary University of London

Queen's building, Mile End campus

With around 21,187 students and 4,000 staff, we are one of the biggest University of London colleges. We teach and research across a wide range of subjects in the humanities, social sciences, law, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering. Based in Mile End, we offer one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London. 

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
15%
85%

Year 1

15%
85%

Year 2

12%
88%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
29%
67%
4%

Year 1

28%
72%

Year 2

9%
91%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 94%
Student score 89% HIGH
Able to access IT resources

70%

Staff made the subject interesting

94%

Library resources are satisfactory

63%

Feedback on work has been helpful

74%

Feedback on work has been prompt

60%

Staff are good at explaining things

98%

Received sufficient advice and support

88%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
7% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
62% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
4% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
370 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
90% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
9% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 96% MED
Average graduate salary £20k HIGH
Graduates who are welfare and housing associate professionals

7%

Graduates who are business, finance and related associate professionals

12%

Graduates who are other administrative occupations

11%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
History is a very popular subject – in 2012, nearly 11,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs. Consequently, history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many – probably most – jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, management and sales and marketing. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year – only law saw more graduates continue on to study. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, politics and museum studies were also popular postgraduate courses.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
It's been a difficult recession for this subject, so unemployment rates are currently looking quite high overall, with salaries on the lower side – and recovery may be long and slow for these graduates. But even despite the figures, most graduates are working after six months, and the most common jobs are in the arts – as photographers, audio-visual technicians, operators and designers, as directors, as artists and as graphic designers. Training in presenting sound and graphics is useful in other industries as well, so you can find graduates in advertising, in business management, in events management and in web design and IT. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common in the arts, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' – having several part-time jobs or commissions at once.
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