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Plymouth Marjon University (St Mark & St John)

Psychology

UCAS Code: R1D4

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

Excluding General Studies

We will accept 2 AS levels in lieu of one A level but must be accompanied by 2 A Levels or BTECs General Studies is excluded.

Pass with 30-42 Level 3 credits at Merit/Distinction with a minimum of 18 credits at Distinction

GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSE English Language Grade C or 4 or above or an acceptable equivalent qualification

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

or a combination of BTEC Level 3 grades

UCAS Tariff

112

Must be achieved from 3 A levels, BTECs or other acceptable Level 3 qualifications

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Psychology

This British Psychological Society accredited degree addresses the main areas of psychology; developmental, cognitive, biological, social, individual differences and research methods. You’ll be regularly putting theory into practice during your placement alongside your work with other students.
Our course is structured through taught sessions and enquiry-based learning. Your intrigue around human behaviour will develop as you learn through both group and individually-based projects.

**Why this course at Marjon?**
• Accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).
• Choose areas that interest you such as education, criminology, mental wellbeing, leadership and management or sports and exercise psychology.
• Practical approach – we believe you learn through doing so practical research and enquiry is common practice in order for you to understand theoretical principles.
• Specialist lab spaces on campus - quiet spaces, ideal for data collection.

**What might I become?**
Graduates of psychology are well placed to gain employment in a wide range of local, national and international organisations and careers. To become a practising professional psychologist you would go on to further study.

**Find out more at Open Day**
Open Day is your opportunity to find out more about studying Psychology at Marjon. You’ll meet lecturers and look around our dedicated psychology lab. Our student life talks will help you prepare to go to university, covering topics such as careers, funding, sport and our award winning on-campus student support service. You can also take a tour of the campus with a current student and find out about the student-led clubs and societies.

**Book on to an Open Day at: www.marjon.ac.uk/open-day**

**Why study at Marjon?**
• Awarded SILVER Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).
• High quality teaching Ranked No 1 in England for teaching quality in the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019.
• Joint 12th in UK for Student Satisfaction as ranked by the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019.
• Top 10 in the UK for student experience as ranked by the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2019*.
• 5th in UK for Courses and Lecturers in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards (WUSCA) 2019.

*Rankings published 23 September 2018. Oxford and Cambridge excluded due to low response rates. Based on National Student Survey 2018

Modules

Ella - Third year, Psychology;
“In the first year we mostly covered the basics of psychology; learning about key theories and research methods. During the second year we got to specialise more in the areas we were interested in and we went out on placement. We looked at thinking, learning, memory and language but had more freedom in choosing essay titles. In our final year we chose some of our modules and looked more closely at neuroscience and adolescent mental health alongside our dissertation research.”

1st Year
Health and wellbeing
Developmental Psychology
Social Psychology
Foundations in Psychology
Psychology in practice
Understanding research: theory and method

2nd Year
Quantitative research methods
Qualitative research methods
Social Psychology
Memory and language
Thinking and learning
Placement

3rd Year
Contemporary issues in Psychology
Understanding and managing specific learning disabilities
Mental health, lifelong conditions and young people
Psychology of sounds
Community Psychology
Neuropsychology
Working with people
Critical Issues in disability and care
Sports and Exercise Psychology
Empirical project

Assessment methods

Our assessments are throughout the year and include essays, research lab reports, presentations and producing leaflets, posters and other materials. There is one exam in every year. Assessments are deigned to offer you the ability to demonstrate your knowledge and provide you with skills for your career.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£11,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Plymouth Marjon University (St Mark & St John)

Department:

School of Sport, Health and Wellbeing

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Psychology

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

95%
UK students
5%
International students
17%
Male students
83%
Female students
74%
2:1 or above
16%
Drop out rate

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Psychology (non-specific)

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£16,500
low
Average annual salary
95%
med
Employed or in further education
76%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Childcare and related personal services
12%
Sports and fitness occupations
11%
Health associate professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

20 years ago, this was a specialist degree for would-be psychologists but now it is the model of a modern, flexible degree subject. One of the UK's fastest-growing subject at degree level, and the second most popular subject overall (it recently overtook business studies), one in 23 of all graduates last year had psychology degrees. As you'd expect with figures like that, jobs in psychology itself are incredibly competitive, so to stand a chance of securing one, you need to get a postgraduate qualification (probably a doctorate in most fields, especially clinical psychology) and some relevant work experience. But even though there are so many psychology graduates — far more than there are jobs in psychology, and over 13,800 in total last year — this degree has a lower unemployment rate than average because its grads are so flexible and well-regarded by business and other industries across the economy. Everywhere there are good jobs in the UK economy, you'll find psychology graduates - and it's hardly surprising as the course helps you gain a mix of good people skills and excellent number and data handling skills. A psychology degree ticks most employers' boxes — but we'd suggest you don't drop your maths modules.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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