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Nottingham Trent University

Games Art

UCAS Code: I630

Foundation Degree in Arts - FdA

Entry requirements


A level

D,D,E

64 UCAS Tariff points from three A-Levels

Pass your Access course with 60 credits overall with a minimum of 45 credits at level 3

GCSE/National 4/National 5

GCSE English grade C/4 or equivalent GCSE Maths grade C/4 or equivalent

64 UCAS Tariff points from your BTEC Level 3 National Diploma and one A-Level or equivalent qualification

64 UCAS Tariff points from your BTEC Level National Extended Certificate and two A-Level or equivalent qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MPP

UCAS Tariff

64
92%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

2.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Computer games graphics

This Games Art foundation degree is designed for those who want a career in the growing games art industry. The game artist creates the visual elements of an interactive computer game, crafting assets like 2D graphics, 3D characters and environment models, surface textures and user interface components.

A game artist may also be involved in conceptualising ideas to help communicate the proposed visual elements during the pre-production phase. This game art degree will give you the opportunity to experience a range of techniques and software used in the games industry, whilst developing specialist skills to support career goals within your chosen art role.

On this course you'll study at our brand new digital media hub - Confetti HQ;

Industry Spec Workstation PC’s
Specialist software including Unreal Engine 4, Autodesk Suite (3DS Max, Maya, Mudbox), Adobe Creative Suite, Zbrush, Quixel 2.0
Wacom Cintiq 13HD Touch Tablets
Foley Recording Room
Audio Production and Recording Equipment
Games Consoles

Modules

Year 1

Concept Art for Games (100 Credit Points)

This module introduces you to the principles of drawing and visualisation that form the fundamentals required for a career as a games artist. You will study idea generation and concept development and its essential use within a games development pre-production stage.

You will develop and refine your game art drawing skills from observation and imagination using both traditional hand drawn techniques and digital processes. The aim is to develop a visual language that will allow you to record information for future development of game art concepts.

On completion of your exploration you will refine your concepts by developing them through 2D and 3D digital processes. This module will introduce the use of 2D digital software and 3D modelling and sculpting software to create visual concepts to relevant industry standard specifications.

Games Art Critical Studies (20 Credit Points)

An understanding of the context of art and design is vital in the creation of games art assets and concepts. This module aims to provide you with the underpinning knowledge of art and design theory and historical context and how it will impact your professional practice within the modern games industry. You will look at both contemporary and historical art and design and its global impact socially, ethically and economically.

You are encouraged to investigate and research a broad range of art, games genres and the wider creative media industries (design, film, animation, illustration, graphic novels) and your research will be presented through your research journal and case study on art style within games.

On completion of your studies you will be able to deconstruct modern video games and critically analyse their design in terms of aesthetics. This module also aims to develop your understanding of the importance of the role of the audience within the games industry and how, as an artist, you are responsible for considering the ethical and social context surrounding the creation of games art for commercial release.

Year 2

Games Art Production (100 Credit Points)

This module aims to build your knowledge and technical skill in the production of game art assets for computer games. You will study the integration of concept art within the computer games production pipeline and its value as part of the development of 2D and 3D art assets. Game art processes taught will include 2D digital software techniques, 2D to 3D workflow and the creation of graphical elements including GUI and HUD creation.

This module will further develop and consolidate your technical knowledge of 2D and 3D visual theory and practice that was initiated in the Concept Art for Games module in year one. This year, you will be introduced to modelling and sculpting techniques specific to the design of 3D game environments including industry standard workflow techniques and pipelines. The techniques taught will be relevant towards the integration of these assets into an industry standard games engine. This will result in you producing innovative environment designs for use within your industry portfolio.

You will be expected to undertake efficient coordination of resources and effective deployment of technology in order to create refined art assets intended for a prescribed professional purpose. You will be required to evaluate your own game art, assess its appropriateness for use within a commercial production and evaluate its suitability in informing your concept’s target audience.

Industry Practice (20 Credit Points)

During this module you will undertake appropriate self-directed projects, working collaboratively on creative work, allowing you to directly apply the knowledge and skills learnt throughout the programme in the context of the workplace. This module aims to develop your overall professionalism and provide you with the knowledge and resources to begin a career in the creative industries.

The Uni


Course location:

Confetti Institute of Creative Technology

Department:

School of Confetti

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computing

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

100%
UK students
0%
International students
83%
Male students
17%
Female students
62%
2:1 or above
24%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
C
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Computer games and animation

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£21,000
med
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
100%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

64%
Information technology and telecommunications professionals
6%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
6%
Information technology technicians
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is a relatively new subject area for this kind of data, so we don’t currently have very much information to display or analyse yet. Gaming is a growing industry, and if it continues to grow we should see the rather high unemployment rate coming down over the next few years. Much the most common jobs for graduates who do get work after six months are in programming roles - but as things stand, be aware that jobs in the field are very competitive and personal contacts - either through family, friends or via specialist employment agencies - are a crucial way into the industry so be prepared to talk as well as code!

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Computer games graphics

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£24k

£24k

£28k

£28k

£31k

£31k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here