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Newman University, Birmingham

Computer Science

UCAS Code: G400

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


As it is not possible to achieve 104 UCAS points through an Access course, Access Students will need 106 UCAS points. You can reach this with the following combination of Distinction, Merit and/ or Pass grades at level 3 achieved from a completed Access course: D27-M0-P18; D124-M6-P15; D21-M12-P12; D18-M18-P9; D15-M24-P6; D12-M24-P3; D9-M36-P0.

UCAS Tariff

104-144

You must achieve at least 104 UCAS points including a minimum of CC at A level or equivalent (e.g.MM at BTEC Diploma; MPP at BTEC Extended Diploma) towards the total tariff.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Subject

Computer science

Creativity and problem-solving are placed at the heart of the BSc (Hons) Computer Science course. On the course, you will be given the opportunity to examine key themes such as computer networks and security, data science, embedded systems, robotics, software engineering, and user interface design and development. The course has an elegant blend of theory and practice and offers a stimulating and challenging learning experience that allows you to develop an informed and practical understanding of the study of Computer Science.

**Why Study Compute Science?**
* This course enables students to develop competence in Computer Science alongside wisdom in its application sufficient for them to progress to postgraduate study or employability.

* Through applied modules, students are provided with a rigorous, coherent and engaging curriculum that draws on the teaching strengths and research expertise in the subject area.

* Relevant professional bodies (e.g. British Computing Society) inform the learning experiences provided to acquire and develop the practical skills essential within Computer Science.

* Learning opportunities encourage and support the spirit of intellectual curiosity and enquiry, an ability to apply computational thinking to solve problems and the capacity for creative computing.

* Students develop an appreciation of legal, professional, economic, environmental, moral and ethical issues involved with Computer Science and their impact upon society.

**What does the course cover?**
In your first year, you will study the basics of computer science. More specifically, you will use client-server architecture appropriately and study the security implications. You will analyse small-scale problems and design their solutions by applying algorithmic and mathematical techniques. The creation and manipulation of simple data collections, web development and programing would also feature in the foundation year.

In your second year, you tailor your study to your strengths while developing a deeper understanding of user interface design, robotics and cybersecurity. More so, you will demonstrate professional responsibility in the development of medium-scale projects. You will have the opportunity to undertake a work placement, which will provide you with valuable and exciting experience within an area you may be considering for a career.

As you progress into the third year, you will study some of the important and higher level Computer Science modules that include topics such as Internet of Things, Deep Learning, Web Application Development and Game Design and Development. Each of these modules develop your ability to think and analyse critically, and also to reflect and develop both personally and professionally with the aim of considering the role and career which you wish to undertake when you graduate. You will undertake a dissertation or final year project which will allow you to explore an aspect of Computer Science in greater detail.

Modules

For a list of modules for years 1, 2, and 3 of the degree please visit the Computer Science BSc (Hons) page on the Newman University website. We pride ourselves on giving good academic and individual support to each of our students. Teaching is varied and assessment is much more than just essays and exams, involving coursework, presentations, case studies authentic scenario-based modes

Assessment methods

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, workshops, seminars, and practical sessions. Modules are assessed through video papers, digital artefacts, e-portfolios and blogs alongside more traditional assessment types such as academic essays, presentations and projects.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Newman University

Department:

Education and Multi-Professional Practice (EMPP)

TEF rating:

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What students say


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After graduation


We don't have more detailed stats to show you in relation to this subject area at this university but read about typical employment outcomes and prospects for graduates of this subject below.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Computer science

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£26k

£26k

£27k

£27k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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