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Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Drama
Student score
79% MED
% employed or in further study
97% MED
Average graduate salary
£14.4k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

International Baccalaureate

UCAS tariff points

112 at A2 or equivalent (which can include Foundation Diploma in Art & Design). A Level General Studies is not accepted

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

Not available

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Part of Manchester School of Theatre, the BA (Hons) Acting course provides the necessary experience and skills to train as a professional actor. Accredited by Drama UK, the course is recognised for its award-winning students, many of whom go onto very successful careers with the major theatre, film and television companies. Students have the opportunity to learn from professionals and the School has strong links with many of the regions key theatres, including The Royal Exchange Theatre, The Library Theatre, The Contact Theatre, Oldham Coliseum Theatre and Bolton Octagon Theatre. Recent students have won many prestigious awards including the Alan Bates Award, The Carleton Hobbs Bursary Award and the Laurence Olivier Bursary. This course is a nationally and internationally acclaimed course which has links with the region’s key employers including BBC, Granada, Royal Exchange Theatre, Contact Theatre and The Lowry. Former students include Sir Anthony Sher, Julie Walters, David Threlfall, Richard Griffiths, Bernard Hill, Steve Coogan, John Thomson, Noreen Kershaw, Amanda Burton and Adam Kotz.


Workshops, classes, seminars and public performances are designed to synthesise component skills that include voice, movement, acting, textual analysis and research. The course aims to nurture instinctive ability in an environment that allows for the development of new skills whilst simultaneously enabling you to recognise particular strengths and abilities. In Year 1, your study units will include movement and voice, ensemble work, acting technique and scene study. Year 2 will include experimental and devised theatre, Shakespeare, acting for camera, stage combat and singing. Year 3 is performance-based and you will work with both staff and guest directors from across Europe in preparation for a series of fully realised public performances in the School’s own Capitol Theatre. Students are also trained to act for radio and take part in the annual Showcase event and festivals at London’s Globe Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company.

Manchester Metropolitan University

The uni - with a new £75 million Business School and Student Hub

MMU is a thriving and diverse community of students from all professions ranging from artists and teachers to business leaders and scientists. Whatever course you choose you'll have access to great industry links and opportunities in one of the UK's most popular student cities. We're two thirds of the way through a £350 million building programme including a new students' union planned for 2014.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 85%
Student score 79% MED
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
2% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
62% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
5% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
361 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
91% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
15% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 97% MED
Average graduate salary £14.4k LOW
Graduates who are other elementary services occupations


Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers


Graduates who are artistic, literary and media occupations


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Drama is a very popular degree subject — in 2015, over 5,000 degrees were awarded to UK graduates. With so many graduates around, jobs in acting are very sought-after and often gained through personal contacts, or through your careers service so be prepared to practise your people skills and to make full use of your university facilities. But there are lots of roles in the arts for drama graduates, in direction, production, audio-visual, set and clothing design and PR. The skills taught by drama courses can be useful elsewhere — a lot of the economy can use people who can perform and present in front of others, and so drama graduates can be found in teaching, management, advertising, project and events organisation and community work. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' — having several part-time jobs or commissions at once — one in ten drama graduates last year had more than one job on the go at once after six months. And starting salaries are not the best - but nevertheless the large majority of drama graduates going into acting still felt that it was just the job for them regardless of pay.
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