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UCEN Manchester

Computing

UCAS Code: 105G

Higher National Diploma - HND

Entry requirements


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About this course


Course option

2.0years

Full-time | 2020

The Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Computing offers students a non-specialist ‘Computing’ pathway, which allows students to complete a Pearson BTEC Higher National Diploma without committing to a particular professional specialism.

At Level 4 the course offers students a broad introduction to the subject area via a mandatory core of learning, while allowing for the acquisition of skills and experience through the selection of optional units across a range of occupational sectors. This effectively builds underpinning core skills while preparing the student for subject specialisation at Level 5.

Students will gain a wide range of sector knowledge tied to practical skills gained in research, self-study, directed study and workplace scenarios.

Modules

Programming (15 Credits)
You will study core concepts of programming with an introduction to algorithms and the characteristics of programming paradigms.

Networking (15 Credits)
The aim of this unit is to provide wider background knowledge of computer networking essentials, how they operate, protocols, standards, security considerations and the prototypes associated with a range of networking technologies.
Students will explore a range of hardware, with related software, and will configure and install these to gain knowledge of networking systems.

Professional Practice (15 credits)
This unit provides a foundation for good practice in a variety of contexts. The ability to communicate effectively using different tools and mediums will ensure that practical, research, design, reporting and presentation tasks are undertaken professionally and in accordance with various communication conventions.

Database Design and Development (15 credits)
The aim of this unit is to give students opportunities to develop an understanding of the concepts and issues relating to database design and development, as well as to provide the practical skills to translate that understanding into the design and creation of complex databases.

Security (15 credits)
The aim of this unit is to provide knowledge of security, associated risks and how security breaches impact on business continuity. Students will examine security measures involving access authorisation, regulation of use, implementing contingency plans and devising security policies and procedures.
This unit introduces students to the detection of threats and vulnerabilities in physical and IT security, and how to manage risks relating to organisational security.

Managing a Successful Computing Project (15 credits)
The aim of this unit is to offer students an opportunity to demonstrate the skills required for managing and implementing a project. They will undertake independent research and investigation for carrying out and executing a computing project which meets appropriate aims and objectives.

Computer Systems Architecture (15 credits)
This unit introduces students to the foundations of computer systems architecture together with the integrated hardware and software components and subsystems that enable and allow data to be input, processed and output. The unit further explores the concepts of operating systems, hardware management and computer networks together with the practical skills needed to diagnose, troubleshoot and maintain computer systems taking the security of these systems into consideration.

Website Design and Development (15 credits)
This unit introduces students to the underpinning services required to host, manage and access a secure website before introducing and exploring the methods used by designers and developers to blend back-end technologies (server-side) with frontend technologies (client-side). To help ensure new designers are able to design and deliver a site that offers an outstanding User Experience (UX) supported by an innovative User Interface (UI) this unit also discusses the reasons, requirements, relationships, capabilities and features of the systems they will be using and gives them an opportunity to explore various tools, techniques and technologies with ‘good design’ principles to plan, design and review a multipage website.

Assessment methods

You will be assessed using a combination of internally assessed centre-devised internal assignments (which are set and marked by UCEN Manchester) and internally assessed Pearson-set assignments (which are set by Pearson and marked by UCEN Manchester). Pearson-set assignments are mandatory and target particular industry-specific skills.

For the HND there are two core units: one core 15 credit unit at Level 4 and one core 30 credit unit at Level 5 will be assessed by a mandatory Pearson-set assignment.

All other units are assessed by centre-devised internal assignments.

An assignment may take a variety of forms, including practical and written types.

Summative assessments are carried out at the end of each semester.

The Uni


Course location:

Openshaw Campus

Department:

CIT (BCCI)

TEF rating:

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