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UCEN Manchester

Childhood and Youth Studies (Top-Up)

UCAS Code: T16Y

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

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About this course


Course option

1.0year

Full-time | 2020

The BA (Hons) Childhood and Youth Studies has been designed to provide an academic pathway for students or staff aspiring to work at a senior level in the sector, across the private, voluntary, educational or independent and statutory sectors.

The programmes have been developed in response to the changing demands of childcare and youth and the ongoing development of free childcare for children. Whilst focussing on youth and childhood up to 19 years. This programme will reflect on the growing demand from government to have more teacher led educators educating young children through to the youth of today, focusing on the increasing emphasise of personal, social, emotional and mental health of children and youth in educational and care settings.

The course is ideal for those with a passion for working with children and youths in education or care establishments, where there is a focus on health and well-being. The programmes explore a number of modules which engage students in reflection from practice and allowing for the students to critique the theoretical work of theorist both past and present.

The BA (Hons) Childhood and Youth Studies has been designed to provide an academic pathway for students or staff aspiring to work at a senior level in the sector, across the private, voluntary, educational or independent and statutory sectors.

The programmes have been developed in response to the changing demands of childcare and youth and the ongoing development of free childcare for children. Whilst focussing on youth and childhood up to 19 years. This programme will reflect on the growing demand from government to have more teacher led educators educating young children through to the youth of today, focusing on the increasing emphasise of personal, social, emotional and mental health of children and youth in educational and care settings.

The course is ideal for those with a passion for working with children and youths in education or care establishments, where there is a focus on health and well-being. The programmes explore a number of modules which engage students in reflection from practice and allowing for the students to critique the theoretical work of theorist both past and present.

Modules

Growing up in a Digital age (20 credits)
This module helps you to develop an understanding of how digital technology influences children of today. The module also allows for you to explore the changes in technology throughout the years and see the implications or advantages that it has on education today.
The assessment for this module allows you to present your findings via a presentation and then further evidence your knowledge with a written component.

Personal Reflective Practice (20 credits)
This module has been designed to help you reflect as a practitioner within your chosen area of expertise. You will also deliver a presentation of personal reflections along with a Viva Voce questioning. In addition, there will be an academic portfolio to complete this module.

Historical and International Perspectives (20 credits)
The module provides an opportunity for you to develop a critical understanding of international schooling from around the world. Whilst drawing on the historical concept of childhood through the Beveridge Report and further key changes in the historical educational timeline. This module allows you to present curriculums from around the world, and then reflect on others in a written report around the changes of childhood and education.

Social Policy (20 credits)
This module builds on knowledge and understanding of social policy within the childcare sector from birth to eighteen.
You will be given the opportunity to present your findings through a question and answer presentation. This will then be followed with a written task to complete your social policy findings and changes.

Dissertation (40 credits)
This double module will allow you to explore an area of interest that will enhance your working practice within the future. The module has been designed to develop your research and academic skills through a variety of formats. The double module will be assessed via a dissertation on a topic of your choice linked to a career that you would like to pursue.

Assessment methods

The course is run in a classroom environment, allowing you to share your ideas and reflections with your peers. You will also receive tutorial support and sessions focused on wider areas in lifelong learning throughout your course. In addition, you will be advised to gain experience within an educational setting.

Examples of assessments on the course include:

• Presentation
• Written assignments including essays, reports and reflective journals
• Reflective journals and accounts on your practice
• Viva Voce
• Dissertation

The Uni


Course location:

Openshaw Campus

Department:

Care (SPS)

TEF rating:

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