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London Metropolitan University

Computer Systems Engineering and Robotics

UCAS Code: HG66

Bachelor of Engineering (with Honours) - BEng (Hon)

Entry requirements


A level

C,C,D

A minimum grades CCD, one of which must be from a relevant subject (or a minimum of 88 UCAS points from an equivalent Level 3 qualification, e.g. BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma/Diploma; or Advanced Diploma; or Progression Diploma; or Access to HE Diploma of 60 credits).

GCSE/National 4/National 5

English Language and Mathematics GCSE at grade C/grade 4 or above.

UCAS Tariff

88

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Other options

4.0 years | Part-time | 2020

Subjects

Computer systems engineering

Mechatronics and robotics

**Why study this course?**

This career-focused course aims to equip you with the key skills needed to succeed as a well-rounded professional who is ready to work in cutting-edge computing and engineering sectors as computer engineers, robotic and intelligent systems developers, hardware designers, software developers or scientific programmers.

Designed to kick-start your career in the age of autonomous, intelligent and computer connected systems, the course puts emphasis on microprocessor and microcontroller-based computer systems design, development and programming. It also allows you to specialise in computer networking or distributed and internet systems.

One of the key strengths of the course is its practical nature, which will allow you to develop hands-on skills and expertise. The course is supported by a number of specialised laboratories in general electronics, microwave and satellite communications, computer aided design, embedded systems and digital systems, and opto-electronics. When studying any of our specialised modules you will spend a considerable part of the module in these laboratories, providing an opportunity to practise what you learn in your lectures and seminar sessions and (using an industry-standard simulation package) investigate, design, implement, test and document a variety of real-world examples of electronics and communications systems. These sessions are performed individually or as part of a group.

You will have opportunities to enhance the skills that employers in the industry are looking for and gain real experience through placements in real client-driven projects – working with business and industry through our work-related learning module. The course will also help you develop interpersonal, team working and engineering skills alongside commercial, ethical and environmental awareness.

As well as setting you up for a rewarding career, this course will also equip you to undertake postgraduate study such as a master's degree programmes or MPhil/PhD.

Modules

Example modules include:

Programming
Electronic Systems
Computer Hardware and Software Architectures
Logic and Mathematical Techniques
Microprocessors & Embedded Systems
Advanced Electronics Systems
Network Operating Systems
Databases
Data Structures & Specialist Programming
Network Engineering
Professional Issues, Ethics & Computer Law
Creating a Winning Business 1
Work Related Learning
Project
Digital Systems Applications
Applied Robotics
Computer Vision
Ethical Hacking
Distributed and Internet Systems
Network and Cloud Security
Mobile Applications
Extension of Knowledge

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£12,700
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Holloway

Department:

Computer Science and Applied Computing

TEF rating:

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What students say


Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Electrical and electronic engineering

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
low
Average annual salary
93%
med
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This is one of the more popular areas to study engineering and there is not quite such a serious shortage of electrical engineers as there is of other engineering subjects - but there's still plenty of demand. The most common jobs are in telecommunications, electrical and electronic engineering, but there is some crossover with the computing industry, so many graduates start work in IT and computing jobs. At the moment, there's a particular demand for electrical engineers in the electronics, and the car and aerospace industries, and also in defence, and salaries can vary across the country depending on the industry you start in. Bear in mind that a lot of courses are four years long, and lead to an MEng qualification — this is necessary if you want to become a Chartered Engineer.

Engineering

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
low
Average annual salary
92%
med
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Graduates are in significant demand, so unemployment rates are well below the national graduate average and starting salaries are well above average. Much the most common industries for these graduates are now vehicle manufacture - there are not enough people with these degrees to go round and so the big employers tend to take the lion's share at the moment. But pretty much anywhere there is manufacturing, there are production engineers. Bear in mind that a lot of courses are four years long, and lead to an MEng qualification — this is necessary if you want to become a Chartered Engineer.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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