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Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time, sandwich 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Computer science
Student score
77% MED
% employed or in further study
87% LOW
Average graduate salary
£18k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

Minimum number of A Levels required: 2 •Is general studies acceptable? Yes •Are AS level awards acceptable? Acceptable only when combined with other qualifications •Average A Level offer: BBC •Maximum AS Level points accepted: 20

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

DMM in a relevant subject area is required if no other level 3 qualifications are taken

UCAS tariff points

We are looking for students who are keen to learn new skills and develop those they already possess. We want students with the ability to: be creative with ideas and concepts, moderate their creativity with logic, be enthusiastic and thirsty for knowledge, communicate effectively and confidently and understand and adapt to a wide range of issues connected with the subject. It is also important that students are able to manage time and tasks effectively as an individual and as part of a team, use appropriate sources to find and organise information and select and critically evaluate information in order to analyse problems. If you would like to develop these skills further, have a strong interest in this subject area and want to work effectively within it, then this is the course for you! International applications will be considered in line with UK qualifications.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

This is the ideal degree if you are interested in pursuing a career where you can use your skills to create digital media and produce rich internet applications. Multimedia computing is at the heart of many of the most exciting technological developments of recent years. The massive growth in internet use in recent years in the form of web and e-commerce developments, the delivery of streaming content by companies such as the BBC, Amazon and Netflix owes much to multimedia computing. But this is only the beginning for multimedia computing; new innovations in augmented and virtual reality are providing opportunities for the development of ground-breaking applications with these new technologies. This programme will give you a solid technical grounding in digital media production using industry-standard tools coupled with skills and expertise in internet application development. These provide the foundation for cutting edge developments in augmented and virtual reality, ensuring that you can grasp all the opportunities arising from the internet economy of the future.


Level 4 •Modules to introduce and develop effective computer programming skills to apply to multimedia developments •Learn the basics of how computers operate and how they can be grouped to form networks of ever-increasing size until we have the internet •Learn how to use internet technologies to build effective web sites •Learn the basics of database development •Gain the fundamental knowledge needed to practice and develop multimedia artefacts •Lay the foundations of a successful professional career development path •Many of the themes introduced at level 4 continue to be developed throughout the remainder of the programme Level 5 •Databases form a key component of many modern multimedia applications. Acquire database design, development and management knowledge and expertise •Develop skills, knowledge and expertise in image processing and the production of digital media and the development of interactive multimedia systems •Learn key project management approaches to apply to digital media production projects •Leverage previous web development experience to produce advanced web developments •Develop research skills to enable innovative and effective applications of digital media techniques and approaches and in preparation for the final year project •Enhance career development by embedding a growing expertise in data science in a framework of industry standard professionalis Sandwich degree: Sandwich degree students will undertake an appropriate year-long industrial placement Level 6 •Explore advanced multimedia development techniques •Develop expertise in the latest multimedia areas or augmented and virtual realities •Explore the latest innovations in the applications of multimedia technology •Extend previous experience in web development and learn to manage web and e-commerce enterprises using analytics •Undertake a large individual project in the digital media area of your choice Further guidance on modules The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers. Please see the programme specification document for further details on this course. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Liverpool John Moores University

Design Academy

With a heritage that stretches back to 1823, Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) is now one of the largest and most well-established universities in the UK. Our research is influencing policymakers, improving people’s lives and finding solutions to the problems of the 21st century. Wherever you’ve come from and wherever you’re planning to get to, LJMU can help you find your place in the world.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 78%
Student score 77% MED
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
8% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
18% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
2% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
350 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
68% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
13% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 87% LOW
Average graduate salary £18k LOW
Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers


Graduates who are information technology and telecommunications professionals


Graduates who are information technology technicians


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
There are a lot of computing courses out there, and they vary a lot in content, modules and the way they work with employers, so individual courses can have very different outcomes. This is a course where you really need to get a good grade — employers really pay attention to the class of your degree and a low grade will serious hit your prospects. But you can get a job on pretty much any industry in the country with a computing degree - and organisation with an IT system and a web site needs graduates in this discipline - and many employers report difficulty in finding graduates. So most students do get jobs, and starting salaries are good, particularly in London. If you want to find out more about the prospects for a computer science course at a particular institution, it's a good idea to go on open days and talk to tutors about what previous graduates went on to do.
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