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King's College London, University of London

Pharmacology

UCAS Code: B210

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


Sorry, no information to show

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Pharmacology

Pharmacology is the science of drugs and how they act, including the search for new drugs, investigations into how they can best be used to treat disease, and their effects on the body. Our wide-ranging Pharmacology BSc course has been designed to give you a sound understanding of the biological action of drugs and chemicals, the way they work at the molecular, cellular and systems level and their use in medicines for the treatment of disease. It is an ideal grounding for a career in the pharmaceutical industry or general biomedical research and for graduate entry to Medicine. However, the course will also equip you with a range of transferrable skills, including data gathering, analysis and interpretation, presentation and team-work that are recognised and valued by employers in both the public and private sector across a variety of industries.

This course forms part of the suite of ‘Common Year one’ courses within the School of Bioscience Education. These comprise Anatomy, Developmental & Human Biology; Biochemistry; Biomedical Science; Medical Physiology; Molecular Genetics; Neuroscience; Pharmacology; Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics. Once you have successfully completed year one, you can choose to switch to any other courses within this suite.

Alternatively, after the ‘Common Year One’ course, you can apply to transfer to one of our four-year MSci courses: Biochemistry MSci; Molecular Genetics MSci; Neuroscience MSci. In year three you can apply to transfer to the four-year Integrated Pharmacology and Physiology for Research MSci. You may also choose to study abroad at one of our partner institutions, or to undertake an extra-mural or work placement, usually at a leading biomedicine employer.

Teaching
Teaching on this course takes place in lectures, seminars and tutorials and through practical laboratory work. The rest of your time will be spent on self-study, including reading, research and writing assignments.

If you choose an extra-mural placement this will be assessed through a written dissertation and a poster presentation which will be deemed equivalent to 60 credits at level 6 (the normal level of year 3 study).

Studying abroad
You will also have the opportunity to study abroad for your second year at one of our partner universities, which currently include:

The Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden
The University of Melbourne, Australia
National University of Singapore
The University of California
The University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
You may be required to fulfil additional entry requirements for this option.

Extra-mural year
Alternatively, you may apply for an extra-mural year, to be taken between the second and third years if selected. Students apply directly to placement providers through a process facilitated by the university. Placements, either in the UK or overseas, may be in a pharmaceutical company, a government research establishment or academic research institute.courses incorporating the extra-mural year are accredited by the Royal Society of Biology.

Placement companies in the past have included:
CIB (Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas), Madrid
Eli Lilly & Company Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline Co. Durham / Stevenage / Uxbridge
Huntingdon Life Sciences Limited
Imanova Ltd, Imperial College
Life Science Institute, National University of Singapore
Medical Research Council Technology
MRC National Institute for Medical Research
Novartis Switzerland / UK / USA
NUS Singapore
Pfizer
William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary’s University London
Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases (CARD), King’s College London
Integrated Pharmacology & Physiology for Research MSci

During year three you can apply to transfer to the four-year MSci Integrated Pharmacology and Physiology for Research, on which you will be required to take a 90-credit research project usually at an external industrial provider within the UK during your fourth year.

The Uni


Course location:

King's College London, University of London

Department:

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Pharmacology

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

76%
UK students
24%
International students
30%
Male students
70%
Female students
89%
2:1 or above
7%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
B

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Pharmacology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£19,000
med
Average annual salary
96%
low
Employed or in further education
56%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

78%
Health professionals
8%
Natural and social science professionals
4%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

As only a relatively small number of students study pharmacology or toxicology, these statistics refer most closely to the graduate prospects of pharmacy graduates, so bear that in mind when you review them. Only a handful of students take first degrees in pure toxicology every year — the subject is more popular at Masters level. Pharmacology is a degree that tends to lead to jobs in the medical and pharmaceutical industries, and outcomes are improving again after a difficult time in the last few years. Jobs in pharmacology are often very specialist and so it’s no surprise that pharmacologists are amongst the most likely of all students to go on to a doctorate — if you want a job in research, start thinking about a PhD. As for pharmacy, unemployment rates are below 1% and 95% of pharmacy graduates had jobs as pharmacists (mostly in retail pharmacists) six months after they left their courses - employment rates have gone up significantly in the last couple of years.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Pharmacology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£23k

£23k

£29k

£29k

£34k

£34k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here