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Glyndwr University, Wrexham

Youth and Community Work

UCAS Code: L593
Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Social work
Student score
73% MED
% employed or in further study
97% MED
Average graduate salary
£15k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

Scottish Highers
Not Available

112 UCAS Tariff points

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

UCAS tariff points

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

This is an exciting course, specially designed for those wanting to work positively with children, young people, marginalised groups and communities. You will learn youth work methods, values and engagement skills for working with individuals and groups to support their personal, social and political development. Through this course you can gain a professional qualification endorsed by Education Training Standards Wales with over a third of your time in placement activities. Successful completion of the course will allow you to register with the Education Workforce Council in Wales as a Youth Worker. As well as placement opportunities in Wales and the UK, there are also opportunities to do a part-funded placement through the erasmus programme. The youth and community department at Wrexham Glyndwr University is regarded as the “home of youth work in Wales”, having offered education and training to the youth and community sector for more than 39 years. As such the department has excellent links with employers across North Wales, North West England, and the Midlands, and it works in partnership with organisations across the statutory, voluntary and third sector. Please be aware it may be necessary to work outside of normal working hours, e.g. during evenings or over weekends, whilst on placement due to the nature of this profession. The intended content and structure of the programme to be delivered in 2017/18 is described below for illustration. While the University expects the general pattern of the programme to be as described, programmes and content are kept under constant review in order to ensure they are up to date and fit for purpose. This may mean some changes are applied and these will be communicated through the website and to those who have applied for the programme.


Year 1 (Level 4) Placement 1 - Preparation for Professional Practice, the first fieldwork placement helps students to establish the basic foundations of good youth and community work practice and embed reflective thinking skills. Values and Principles of Youth and Community Work - Examine the core principles of youth and community work. Understand the values of informal education, in particular recognising and understanding anti-oppressive practice.  students will start to explore and develop their professional indentity. Working Creatively with Groups - An exciting module bringing together group work theory and creative practice. Working Together to Safeguard Others - Exploring the role of the youth and community worker in safeguarding young people and vulnerable adults, and how to work effectively within multi-agency settings. Year 2 (Level 5)  Placement 2 - Integrating Professional Practice - The second fieldwork placement is a block placement, allowing the student to be embedded within the field of youth and community work and develop their skills in practice. This could be a placement within Europe or further afield. Political and Sociological Perspectives in Youth and Community Work - Identify and analyse how political agendas and social policies can shape the context of practice, and recognise different political perspectives on welfare and social policy. International Youth Work – An opportunity to explore the benefits of international youth work and intercultural learning for young people. Identifying different youth work practices across the world, and the role of the youth and community worker in understanding their own, and helping others to understand their own cultural identity. Research Methods - Identify what is meant by social research, and how it can be applied to investigate an area of practice or a social issue within youth and community work. Year 3 (Level 6) Placement 3 – Leading in Professional Practice – an opportunity for students to put leadership and supervisory skills into practice in a youth and community work setting. Research Project - Supported by a research project supervisor, students will conduct a piece of unique research into an area related to youth and community work that will positively impact on practice and policy. Leading in Contemporary Youth and Community Work Practice - Identify and critically evaluate models of leadership in youth and community work contexts, analysing the skills required to lead in contemporary practice and the demands of working within evidence-based practice environments. Professional Supervision - Students will understand the importance of professional supervision in supporting and developing staff and volunteers, and develop skills to implement this in practice. This module is also available as a stand alone CPD module. Critical Analysis of Education in Youth and Community Work - Set within the current youth and community work policy context this module is an in-depth exploration of the core values and principles of informal education, critically analysing the concepts of dialogue, participation, empowerment, partnership and anti-oppressive practice. Students will complete the module having developed their professional identity as an informal educator.   The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Glyndwr University, Wrexham

Main entrance

Based in Wrexham but with campuses and facilities around north-east Wales, Glyndwr University champions the spirit of enterprise. We aim to be bold and enterprising in everything we do. Our courses are tailored to be relevant to industry, working closely with partners in business including Airbus, Rolls Royce and the BBC to ensure our graduates get the skills they need to gain employment.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 74%
Student score 73% MED
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
1% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
83% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
34% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
239 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
63% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
8% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 97% MED
Average graduate salary £15k LOW
Graduates who are welfare professionals


Graduates who are welfare and housing associate professionals


Graduates who are other elementary services occupations


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
We're short of social workers - so if you want a degree that is in demand, then this could be the one for you! There's a shortage of social workers all over the UK, and graduates can specialise in specific fields such as mental health or children's social work. If you decide social work is not for you, then social work graduates also often go into management, education, youth and community work and even nursing. Starting salaries for this degree can reflect the high proportion of graduates who choose a social work career - social work graduates get paid, on average, more than graduates overall, but not all options pay as well as social work. This is also an unusual subject in that London isn't one of the more common places to find jobs - so if you want to get a job near to your home or your university this might be worth thinking about.
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