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Glyndwr University, Wrexham

Social and Cultural History and English

UCAS Code: SE19

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

Accepted alongside A-Levels as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

112 UCAS Tariff points

112 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

112 UCAS Tariff points from International Baccalaureate Certificates

112 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted alongside Irish Leaving Certificate Higher Level as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff requirement.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

112 UCAS Tariff points

112 UCAS Tariff points

UCAS Tariff

112

Accepted as part of overall 112 UCAS Tariff point requirement.

About this course


Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2019

Subjects

Social history

English literature

If you enjoy investigating the past as well as reading and discussing books and ideas, why not choose this course and divide your studies between these two complementary subjects.
Students will:
• study themes from Medieval Welsh, British and European history, through to Renaissance and modern history alongside English
• combine analysis of the created worlds of fiction with investigations of the social and political realities that produced them
• develop the skills to become fine-tuned critics, analytical thinkers and writers, as they open up a wide range of career opportunities

Modules

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)

Year one introduces students to a range of written genres and historical periods and provides a comprehensive platform for the more detailed study undertaken in year two.

ENGLISH MODULES

Introduction to Narrative
Stage and Screen
Life Writing
Introduction to Poetry
Personal, Professional and Academic Skills

HISTORY MODULES

Introducing Historical research
The Roman Empire
Personal, Professional and Academic Skills
Crime and Popular Culture in Victorian Britain
National Identity in Europe 1860-1945

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)

Year two builds upon the investigate skills of the historian and the analytical skills of the reader/critic developed in year one. In addition, year two offers History students work placement opportunities and field trips.

ENGLISH MODULES

Post-War British Writing
Victorian Writing
Critical Theory
Romantic Writing
The Short Story

HISTORY MODULES

The British in America, 1607-1783
Life in Tudor England and Wales
The Georgian Age
Culture and Belief in Renaissance Europe
Research Methods in Humanities
History in the Workplace

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)

Year three caters for a more advanced investigation into genre and period and further develops critical skills of investigation. Students will also carry out an extended project of their choice which complements and enhances the skills and knowledge acquired over the course of the degree.

ENGLISH MODULES

Post-Colonial Writing
Post-Modern Writing
Gender, Sexuality and Writing
Modernism and Culture
Dissertation

HISTORY MODULES

Rise of a New Society
Nineteenth Century Wales
Revolution and Readjustment in England and Wales 1625-1690
American Frontiers in the Nineteenth Century
Dissertation

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment methods

Our English & History Degree employs a wide range of assessment methods, which include:

Essays
Exams
Oral Presentations
Reflective Journals
Portfolios

Wrexham Glynd?r University is committed to supporting our students to maximise their academic potential.

We offer workshops and support sessions in areas such as academic writing, effective note-making and preparing for assignments. Students can book appointments with academic skills tutors dedicated to helping deal with the practicalities of university work. Our student support section has more information on the help available.

Formal scheduled contact time is 12 hours per week - although this can vary depending on the nature of the modules undertaken (for example the work placement module in year two places more emphasis on workplace attendance).

Lectures are delivered by highly qualified staff who employ a range of electronic and hard-copy sources to inform sessions and encourage participation.

Staff are also available outside scheduled teaching hours to discuss any problems or issues students may have. Our students are able to benefit from the Disability support and general learning support offered on-site.

Field trips are staff-led and, for non-local visits, transport is provided. All entrance fees to the sites we visit are covered by the University

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,000
per year
England
£9,000
per year
EU
£9,000
per year
International
£11,750
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,000
per year
Scotland
£9,000
per year
Wales
£9,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Wrexham

Department:

School of the Creative Arts

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Social history

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

English studies

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

10%
UK students
90%
International students
86%
Male students
14%
Female students
74%
2:1 or above
0%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
C
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

History

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

91%
low
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

15%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
10%
Managers and proprietors in hospitality and leisure services
10%
Other administrative occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

History is a very popular subject (although numbers have fallen of late) — in 2015, over 10,000 UK students graduated in a history-related course. Obviously, there aren't 11,000 jobs as historians available every year, but history is a good, flexible degree that allows graduates to go into a wide range of different jobs, and consequently history graduates have an unemployment rate comparable to the national graduate average. Many — probably most — jobs for graduates don't ask for a particular degree to go into them and history graduates are well set to take advantage. That's why so many go into jobs in the finance industry, human resources, marketing, PR and events management, as well as the more obvious roles in education, welfare and the arts. Around one in five history graduates went into further study last year. History and teaching were the most popular further study subjects for history graduates, but law, journalism, and politics were also popular postgraduate courses.

English studies

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

87%
low
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here