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Glyndwr University, Wrexham

Music Technology (with Foundation Year)

UCAS Code: W370

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

E,E,E

Accepted alongside A-Levels as part of overall 48 UCAS Tariff requirement.

48 UCAS Tariff points

48 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted as part of overall 48 UCAS Tariff requirement.

48 UCAS Tariff points from International Baccalaureate Certificates

48 UCAS Tariff points

Accepted alongside Irish Leaving Certificate Higher Level as part of overall 48 UCAS Tariff requirement.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MP

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

PPP

48 UCAS Tariff points

48 UCAS Tariff points

UCAS Tariff

48

Our general entry requirement for the foundation year is 48 UCAS tariff points but all applications are considered individually and we consider work experience, vocational training/qualifications as well as motivation and potential to succeed. The programme welcomes applications from anyone who can demonstrate a commitment to the subject and the potential to complete their chosen programme successfully. This can be established by showing appropriate academic achievements or by demonstrating that they possess the knowledge and ability equivalent to the academic qualifications.

Accepted as part of overall 48 UCAS Tariff point requirement.

50%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


Course option

4years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Music technology

Practical use of the Universitys 24/7 recording studio is at the heart of this course which allows you to complete a professional production of your own.This music technology course is designed for students who may be from a performance background and are seeking to develop their skill set with the acquisition of a high level of technical appreciation as a means to increase their career and professional potential.It covers a range of technologies and will include development of your own portfolio of production pieces and access to many of the local music venues.The course, which is built around the practical use of the universityswell equipped recording studio and makes full use of the facilities in the Centre for the Creative Industries, is based on exploring current and emerging technologies relating to audio production, and how these can be used to create music and sound for many applications.There are also opportunities for students to gain work experience in live sound and large scale event production during Focus Wales music festival, which the university is a partner of, comes to Wrexham each spring. The event is a multi-venue festival which places the music industry spotlight firmly on the emerging talent that Wales has to offer the world and attracts more than 200 bands across 20 stages.

Modules

YEAR 1 (FOUNDATION YEAR)

During your foundation year you’ll receive an introduction to live working with creative media technology. You will learn through experience of working with radio, recording, TV and journalism, as well as the various stages of media production. Students will also gain a broad overview of the current landscape of the media industries as well as introducing the social and cultural impact that the creative industries have within modern society.

MODULES

Creative Media Technology
Creative Media Applications
Media, Identity, and Modern Culture
Personal Project

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 4)

The first year of the course covers the core science and technology that is required to enable you to progress. There is a good mix of subjects and manners of delivery. The science has experiments that you use to investigate audio principles. You also get hands on use in the recording studio and get to grips with recording styles. Later on you will be designing software synthesisers and using them as instruments.

MODULES

Radio Production
Audio & Visual Science
Recording Technology
Live Sound
Sound Synthesis & Sampling
Creative Futures

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 5)

This level lets you apply skills you have learnt and add to your growing portfolio of knowledge. The new subjects compliment the previous year and develop you music and music programming skills.

MODULES

Music Production
Compositional Technology
Research Methods
Recording Technology Advanced Studio Practise
Interactive Music Systems
Club Culture (option) or
Theatre Technology (option)

YEAR 4 (LEVEL 6)

This is the opportunity to apply what you have learnt and develop interesting installations and developments in music. The project or dissertation is the main piece of work and gives you the chance to explore an area to great depth, it can be designing and building firmware through to research into an aspect of the industry.

MODULES

Collaborative Performance
Location recording
Audio Post-Production
Live Systems
Project (option) or
Dissertation (option)

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment methods

There is a range of assessment methods used for this course including creating music productions, essays, work based learning, portfolios, reports, and presentations.

All assessments will be course based, and therefore there are no traditional exams.

Wrexham Glynd?r University is committed to supporting our students to maximise their academic potential.

We offer workshops and support sessions in areas such as academic writing, effective note-making and preparing for assignments. Students can book appointments with academic skills tutors dedicated to helping deal with the practicalities of university work. Our student support section has more information on the help available.

Teaching time depends on the type of module being taken. They range from developing practical skills through to technical taught classes. Contact time will be explained with students during the start of the module

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,000
per year
England
£9,000
per year
EU
£9,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,000
per year
Scotland
£9,000
per year
Wales
£9,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Wrexham

Department:

School of the Creative Arts

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Creative arts and design

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

98%
UK students
2%
International students
95%
Male students
5%
Female students
59%
2:1 or above
23%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
A*
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Music

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£15,600
low
Average annual salary
81%
low
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

18%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
16%
Other elementary services occupations
14%
Design occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Music is a popular degree subject and a little over 4,600 degrees were awarded to UK graduates in 2015. Most were working after six months — but postgraduate study (usually continuing with music) is quite common and a lot of graduates go into music teaching, often as freelance or travelling music teachers of particular instruments. Obviously, many music graduates get work as musicians as well, or work as sound recordists and in similar technical roles. Music is important in advertising and so a lot of graduates go into this industry, and management is also a popular job role for music graduates. There's also a niche for music graduates wanting to work in IT and computing, particularly with web applications. Because a lot of musician work is temporary or freelance, the most common way for new graduates to get jobs as musicians is through their own contacts, so learning how to make good use of networks and contacts might help in your career.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Music technology

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£13k

£13k

£12k

£12k

£15k

£15k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here