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University Centre Farnborough

English Literature with Criminology

UCAS Code: QL31

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

72

About this course


Course option

2years

Full-time | 2019

Subject

Criminology

**Studying English literature with criminology will give you a varied and fascinating course, with plenty of transferable skills to take into a career or master's degree. The combination of these two subjects will introduce you to a number of insightful and challenging topics, such as the criminal justice system, crime prevention, poetic language, and gender and literature.**

Our two-year fast-track degrees are awarded by the University of Surrey. They have been created so that you can:

- Start your career or masters course a year sooner

- Save money by paying for just two years’ tuition fees

- Save money on the costs associated with being a student

- Based at Farnborough College of Technology, we offer classroom-based lectures, a small campus experience and plenty of personalised support. This makes us a popular choice locally for those who want to study higher education in a down-to-earth setting – where you won’t get lost in the crowd.

Modules chosen at Level 5 and Level 6 will define the particular degree title awarded, of either BA (Hons) Criminology with English Literature or BA (Hons) English Literature with Criminology.

**What will I study?**

**Criminology**
The study of crime is a fascinating area to delve into. During your degree, you will begin to think like a criminologist, by unpicking the theories that seek to explain types and trends of crime and how society and the police choose to deal with them.

You will use quantitative research methods to inspect topics such as victimology where you will explore the psychological effects of crime victims, and criminal profiling where you will investigate what makes a criminal and how can you identify them.

This course will introduce you to many fascinating theories and practices within the subject of crime. You will be debating a range of thought-provoking ideas and working on assignments that reflect both crime prevention and critical issues that surround crime.

**English Literature**
English literature is naturally an ideal subject for those with a passion for books, reading, and the spoken word. We encounter literature every day - in books, magazines, poetry, advertising, plays, song lyrics, and TV boxsets. The ability to analyse these texts and their subtle meanings is a skill that could lead to a range of interesting careers.

At Farnborough, you will read a range of stimulating and diverse texts. This ranges from the Renaissance period to the modern day while learning about historical contexts, gender and literature, poetic language and more along the way.

A degree in English will hone your own communication skills and encourage creative writing – skills that can help set you apart from other graduates when starting your new career.

Modules

English Literature combines theoretical study of different genres from poetry to drama to fiction. Year One will start with inter disciplinary and thematic textual analysis through an introduction to narrative, poetry and literary theory such as Marxism and Feminism. Year Two will include a selection of more specialised modules such as Shakespeare, the 18th century novel, Victorian and contemporary literature as well as a dissertation. The Bachelor of Science programme in Criminology focuses on the study of criminal behaviour, society’s response to it and how crime is related to other social issues in wider society. Criminological theories will help further an understanding of why individuals deviate from social norms and engage in criminal behaviour. Research methods will enhance students’ knowledge of the varying ways we can research crime and criminality to gain a deeper understanding and wider picture of the problem.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£8,000
per year
England
£8,000
per year
EU
£12,000
per year
International
£12,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£8,000
per year
Scotland
£8,000
per year
Wales
£8,000
per year

The Uni


Course location:

University Centre Farnborough

Department:

Education and Humanities

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

79%
med
Criminology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sociology

Teaching and learning

83%
Staff make the subject interesting
83%
Staff are good at explaining things
81%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
86%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

61%
Library resources
74%
IT resources
65%
Course specific equipment and facilities
61%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

After graduation


Sorry, no information to show

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

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While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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