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Falmouth University

Animation and Visual Effects

UCAS Code: WG64

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


We welcome A Levels in a wide range of subjects, especially in those relevant to the course for which you apply.

60 credits (with a minimum of 45 credits achieved at level 3) in a relevant subject.

We may consider a standalone AS in a relevant subject, if it is taken along with other A Levels and if an A Level has not been taken in the same subject. However, you will not be disadvantaged if you do not have a standalone AS subject as we will not ordinarily use them in our offers.

a minimum of 40 UCAS tariff points, when combined with a minimum of 64 UCAS tariff points from the Supporting Qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

24

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

Acceptable when combined with other qualifications

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points

UCAS Tariff

104-120

A typical offer is between 104 and 120 UCAS points, primarily from Level 3 equivalent qualifications, such as A levels, a BTEC Extended Diploma or a Foundation Diploma, or current, relevant experience. Grade 4 (or C) or above in GCSE English Language, or equivalent, is a minimum language requirement for all applicants. Due to the creative nature of our courses, you will be considered on your own individual merit and potential to succeed on your chosen course. Please contact the Applicant Services team for advice if you are predicted UCAS points below this range, or if you have questions about the qualifications or experience you have.

62%
Applicants receiving offers

You may also need to…

Attend an interview

Present a portfolio

About this course


Course option

3years

Full-time | 2018

Subject

Animation

Launch your career in a rapidly growing sector. Youll learn and develop animation skills using industry-standard software, working creatively across a range of subjects, from traditional art practices to the complex work of visual effects.Supported by experts from all forms of animation and visual effects, youll experience a professional studio environment. Discover all forms of animation, trying your hand at 2D and 3D computer, stop motion and experimental work. You'll work in groups on projects that range from short assignments and live briefs through to films for festivals and competitions. All this is guided and nurtured by our expert staff and industry mentors.Were incredibly well connected; our Honorary Fellows are Peter Lord and David Sproxton, founders of Aardman Animations. Visiting professionals have included Oscar and BAFTA nominated director Barry Purves (King Kong), Matthew Tinsley (VFX: Quantum of Solace, Spectre, Skyfall), Chris Vogler (The Lion King), writer and animation historian Paul Wells and from Canada, title sequence designer Lola Landekic. During our VR Day we welcomed guest speakers and workshops from The Mill, Alchemy VR and Atlantic Productions.Productions featuring Falmouth graduates include Captain America: Civil War, Spectre, Star Trek Beyond, Assassins Creed, F1 2016, The Jungle Book and The Legend of Tarzan.

Modules

Year one:

Combining individual assignments and group projects, your 1st year is designed to provide you with the skills base and knowledge to creat your first animations. You’ll have the chance to try 2D & 3D CG, traditional 2D, stop-motion and experimental animation through a series of workshops, lectures and seminars. This practical work is supported by lectures in animation, drawing, design, storyboarding, and animation history and theory. Projects will be a mixture of short assignments and comprehensive live briefs, working with professionals from outside of the University.

◦Animation practice
◦Design, Storyboarding & Motion Studies
◦History & Theory of Animation
◦Study Trip - Optional study trip to an animation festival

Year two:

Your 2nd year allows you to pick a pathway in either Animation or Visual Effects. During this year you’ll develop your individual Animation or VFX practice, galvanising your interests and skills. Part of your 2nd year entails becoming an essential member of the Production Team for one of the 3rd year projects as well as giving you greater insight into teamwork and collaboration.

Your 2nd year also allows you the opportunity to study at one of Falmouth’s international partners through Study Abroad.

As a complete creative University you’ll have opportunities to collaborate with students from other courses such as Film, Television, Acting and Illustration, often of benefit to your project work.

◦Animation Practice
◦Animation Technologies
◦Electives - In either pre or post-production Animation & Visual Effects
◦Research & Method
◦Study Abroad

Year three:

Your final year allows you to pitch and produce a major piece of animation. With support from tutors and visiting professionals you’ll develop an idea from initial concepts into a full animation production. Recent 3rd year students have enjoyed insight from companies such as Aardman Animation, Passion Pictures, TT Games, Spider Eye and Character Shop.

Your film productions will be additionally supported by an industry mentor. These mentors are based at some of the UK’s leading production companies and offer crucial developmental advice in your final year.

To support your practice you’ll also write a dissertation about a subject of your choice. Throughout the year you’ll benefit from close tutor support ensuring that you graduate with a strong showreel and portfolio, preparing you and helping you take the first steps in your professional career.

◦Final Major Project
◦Professional Practice
◦Dissertation

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,250
per year
England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
International
£15,000
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Penryn Campus

Department:

School of Film and Television

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

77%
med
Animation

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Cinematics and photography

Teaching and learning

80%
Staff make the subject interesting
87%
Staff are good at explaining things
84%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
83%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

85%
Library resources
90%
IT resources
87%
Course specific equipment and facilities
58%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions
Feel part of a community on my course

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

93%
UK students
7%
International students
36%
Male students
64%
Female students
67%
2:1 or above
15%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

B
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Cinematics and photography

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£15,500
med
Average annual salary
97%
high
Employed or in further education
96%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

48%
Artistic, literary and media occupations
12%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
10%
Other elementary services occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

A few years ago graduates from this subject were having a very hard time but things have improved a lot thanks to our active media, film and photographic industries - much the most common employers for this group. The most common jobs are in the arts — as photographers, audio-visual technicians, operators and designers, as directors, as artists and as graphic designers. Training in presenting sound and graphics is useful in other industries as well, so you can find graduates in journalism, in advertising, in business management, in events management and in web design and IT. Be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common in the arts, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' — having several part-time jobs or commissions at once.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Animation

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£13k

£13k

£16k

£16k

£19k

£19k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the criteria they expect applicants to satisfy; some may be compulsory, others may be preferable.

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This is the percentage of applicants to this course who received an offer last year, through Ucas.

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This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Course location and department:

This is what the university has told Ucas about the course. Use it to get a quick idea about what makes it unique compared to similar courses, elsewhere.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

We've received this information from the Department for Education, via Ucas. This is how the university as a whole has been rated for its quality of teaching: gold silver or bronze. Note, not all universities have taken part in the TEF.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here