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Coventry University

Social Sciences

UCAS Code: L400

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


Sorry, no information to show

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Other options

4.0 years | Sandwich | 2020

Subject

Social sciences

This course draws on social research to discuss current issues facing society and explores potential policy and practice solutions. Take our virtual tour
Are you interested in what shapes us as human beings individually and collectively? Do you want to make a difference and understand how best we can improve people’s lives?

The global challenges we face in the 21st century – from poverty, hunger and access to clean water to migration, violence and terrorism – has led to a growing demand for the type of critical insight and analysis social scientists can provide.

Building on our social sciences expertise in psychology, sociology, criminology, community development and social policy, this exciting new course offers the chance to participate in cutting-edge, evidence based discussions to gain a deeper understanding of contemporary pressures facing people in society. It is designed to help empower you for future careers shaping policy or informing social action in local or national government, education, charity leadership and management, research.

**Year 1**

The first year will introduce you to social sciences perspectives, theories and methods, drawn particularly but not exclusively from psychology, sociology and criminology. Four topics (migration, poverty, security and the environment) are then explored to illustrate how social sciences theories can be used to analyse global challenges from different perspectives. For example, taking the challenge of food poverty: how does it feel to experience famine, what should society do about it and what is the connection between international famine relief and corruption?

You will also be given training in key study skills, the use of information technology and library resources. This lays the foundations for developing rigorous research approaches to gain a better understanding of important social issues.

**Year 2**

In the second year, we give attention to global and local issues and social policy. We will cover how to draw upon theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence, such as census data and organisational case studies, to study contemporary challenges like discrimination, inequality, environmental impact on society and groups or health and social care for an ageing population.

We will expand on the range of research methods available to social scientists, emphasising the need for ethical, rigorous collection and analysis of data, comparative across time and place. You should gain hands-on experience of problem and enquiry based learning; for example, undertaking exercises to define a social problem you are concerned about, explore the extent of the problem and its causes and come up with possible solutions to test.

**Placement Year**

After your second year, you can choose to take an optional sandwich year, studying abroad or on professional placement.

**Final Year**

The final year considers in further detail the application of social science theories and methods to working in organisations, developing evidence-based policies, interventions and social action. There is an emphasis on values, ethics and social research. This stage of the course offers an opportunity to be creative and develop your own academic and professional interests in preparation for employment or postgraduate study, depending on your choice of topic for the independent research project.

Modules

For details about individual modules please visit the course page on our website.

The Uni


Course location:

Coventry University

Department:

School of Psychological, Social and Behavioural Sciences

TEF rating:

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What students say


How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sociology, social policy and anthropology

Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.


Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

88%
UK students
12%
International students
25%
Male students
75%
Female students
71%
2:1 or above
7%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
D

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Sociology, social policy and anthropology

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£20,000
high
Average annual salary
98%
high
Employed or in further education
93%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

21%
Welfare and housing associate professionals
9%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
7%
Protective service occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

This section covers a range of subjects that are often very different, so if you have a particular course in mind, the data here might not fully reflect the possible outcomes from your particular choice. Graduates from these subjects tend to do similar sorts of things to graduates from other social studies courses, so welfare and community roles are common, as are education, whilst graduates also often go into management, marketing and HR jobs and jobs in the police, and employment rates are good in general — but talk to course tutors and attend open days and try to get stats for the course you’re interested in.

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Course location and department:

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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